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  • Hey, everybody.

  • I'm Cristen from "Stuff Mom Never Told You"

  • here to tell you why Friday the 13th is considered unlucky.

  • Because in North America and Europe,

  • a significant proportion of the population

  • behaves very strangely on Friday the 13th.

  • Some people won't fly in airplanes,

  • host parties, apply for jobs, get married,

  • or even start new projects.

  • In fact, in the United States, roughly 8% of the population

  • is afraid of Friday the 13th, which

  • is a condition known as-- say it with me--

  • Paraskevidekatriaphobia.

  • That's right.

  • It's actually a combination of two separate fears.

  • We have fear of the number 13, called triskaidekaphobia,

  • and fear of Fridays, which is funny

  • because everybody's always working for the weekend,

  • or so I thought.

  • Anyway, the most familiar source of both of these phobias

  • is actually Christian theology.

  • 13 is significant to Christians because it

  • is the number of people who were present at the Last Supper,

  • because you've got Jesus and his Twelve Apostles.

  • And Judas, the Apostle who betrayed Jesus,

  • was allegedly the 13th member of the party to arrive.

  • I think Judas was just being fashionably late, but you know.

  • Now Christians have traditionally

  • been wary of Fridays because they also

  • think that Jesus was crucified on a Friday.

  • Some theologians think that Adam and Eve

  • ate from the forbidden fruit on a Friday.

  • What's going on?

  • Why are all of the worst events in the Bible happening

  • on Friday, including the Great Flood?

  • Yeah, supposedly Noah and his Ark set sail on a Friday.

  • Is Friday God's least favorite day?

  • I'm starting to maybe think that it is.

  • Because of all this, in the past many Christians would never

  • begin any new project or trip on a Friday for fear that

  • the endeavour would be doomed from the start.

  • Now sailors were particularly superstitious in this regard,

  • often refusing to ship out to sea on a Friday.

  • According to nautical legend, in the 18th century

  • the British Navy commissioned a ship called the HMS Friday

  • in order to quell this superstition.

  • The Navy selected the crew on a Friday.

  • They launched the ship on a Friday.

  • They even selected a man named James Friday as the ship's

  • captain.

  • And then one Friday morning the ship set sail.

  • But at bad luck would have it, it disappeared.

  • Some historians then also trace a Christian distrust of Friday

  • to the church's overall opposition to pagan religions,

  • because, did you know, Friday is named after Frigg,

  • the Norse goddess of love and sex

  • who sounds like a really fun lady

  • to invite to one of your weekend parties.

  • Now this strong female figure, these historians claimed,

  • posed a threat to the male dominated Christianity.

  • So to fight her influence, the Christian church

  • characterized her as a witch, vilifying the day after her.

  • This characterization may have also played

  • a part of the fear of the number 13, triskaidekaphobia.

  • Do you remember that word?

  • Yeah.

  • I did.

  • I can just now start to say it correctly.

  • It was said that Frigg would often

  • join a convent of witches, normally a group of 12,

  • bringing the total number to 13.

  • And a similar Christian tradition

  • holds that 13 is unholy because it signifies

  • the gathering of 12 witches and the devil.

  • What?

  • That's kind of cool.

  • Some trace the infamy of the number 13

  • also back to ancient Norse culture.

  • In Norse mythology, the beloved hero Baldr

  • was killed at a banquet by the malevolent god

  • Loki who crashed the party of, you guessed it, 12,

  • bringing the group to 13.

  • And this story plus the story of the Last Supper

  • led to one of the most entrenched connotations

  • of the number 13.

  • You should never sit down to a meal at a group of 13.

  • Another significant part of the Friday the 13th legend

  • is particularly bad.

  • And this was a Friday the 13th that

  • occurred in the Middle Ages.

  • On a Friday the 13th in 1306, King Philip of France

  • burned the revered Knights of Templar at the stake,

  • marking the day as an occasion of evil.

  • Now these days, some people come to fear Friday

  • the 13th because of misfortune they've

  • experienced on that day in the past.

  • So if you get in a car wreck on Friday the 13th

  • or lose your wallet on that day, then that superstition

  • is bound to stick with you.

  • If you think about it, terrible things, horrible things,

  • or just mundane things like spilling coffee on your lap,

  • losing your wallet, losing your cell phone, et cetera,

  • this stuff happens all of the time.

  • If you're looking for bad luck on Friday the 13th,

  • you'll probably find it.

  • Same thing with Saturday the 14th

  • or Sunday the 15th, bad luck is everywhere, people.

  • So why do we consider Friday the 13th unlucky?

  • Well, maybe just because we want to.

  • If you want to learn more about traditions, cultures,

  • and how our bodies work in this crazy modern world,

  • you should watch more BrainStuff videos.

  • And don't forget to subscribe.

  • It's a very lucky thing to do.

  • I promise.

Hey, everybody.

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Why Is Friday The 13th Considered Unlucky?

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    阿多賓 posted on 2015/02/20
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