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  • (upbeat music) (audience cheering)

  • - Madiba's light shone so brightly,

  • even from that narrow, Robben Island cell,

  • that in the late '70s,

  • he could inspire a young college student

  • on the other side of the world.

  • Mandela said, "Young people are capable when aroused

  • "of bringing down the towers of oppression

  • "and raising the banners of freedom."

  • Now is a good time to be aroused.

  • - Let's just acknowledged how dope you have to be

  • for people to keep throwing you birthdays after you're dead.

  • (audience laughs)

  • And because today marks 100 years since his birth,

  • I just wanted to spend a few minutes talking about the man.

  • Right, he joined politics when he was just 26 years old,

  • partly to fight racial inequality,

  • and also because he had just been kicked off

  • his parents' Obamacare.

  • (audience laughs) Now, at first,

  • at first the ANC fought for racial equality peacefully,

  • but the racist government only got more oppressive.

  • In fact in 1948, South Africa's government set up apartheid

  • which made legal racism the foundation

  • of the entire country.

  • Black people couldn't vote,

  • they had to live in certain areas,

  • and they were banned from playing sports with white people.

  • And I'm not gonna lie,

  • that last part I completely understand.

  • All right, I mean if your system

  • is based on white supremacy,

  • you can't have black people dunking all over your shit.

  • (audience laughs)

  • It just doesn't go with the narrative,

  • like white people are superior, ah!

  • Wait, I wasn't ready, I wasn't ready.

  • (audience laughs)

  • In fact, the government became so oppressive

  • that Mandela and the ANC decided to resort to violence.

  • They bombed power stations, post offices,

  • and I mean they did it when people weren't in there,

  • but still, they blew shit up.

  • And there were many people, not just in South Africa,

  • but around the world, who wanted him to respond

  • to the brutality of the government with civility,

  • to which Mandela replied, bullshit.

  • (audience laughs)

  • - There are many people who feel

  • that it is useless and futile for us

  • to continue talking peace and non-violence

  • against a government whose reply

  • is only savage attacks

  • on an unarmed and defenseless people.

  • - Now I know for a lot of people

  • seeing a young, radical Mandela, that's a bit of a shock.

  • Yeah, it's like finding out one of the Care Bears

  • mauled a hiker to death.

  • (audience laughs)

  • I mean, I'd expect that out of Tenderheart,

  • but you Funshine?

  • (audience laughs)

  • But you see, Nelson Mandela believed that violence

  • was necessary to fight a violent government.

  • And he paid a price for it.

  • In 1962, when Mandela was 44 years old,

  • the apartheid government arrested him,

  • and sentenced him to life in prison.

  • And what he said in the docks is legendary.

  • He said, "I've cherished the ideal

  • "of a democratic and free society.

  • "It is an ideal which I hope to live, and to achieve,

  • "but if needs be, it is an ideal

  • "for which I am prepared to die."

  • Now, Nelson Mandela's story up to that point was impressive,

  • but it's what he did after he came out of prison

  • that transformed him from a leader to a legend.

  • All right, because when he became South Africa's

  • first black president,

  • he reconciled the country, and he insisted

  • that white people be a part of it.

  • And you realize, this is a black country

  • and he's the first black president.

  • He could've easily just said,

  • "I'll give you white people a 10 minute headstart."

  • (audience laughs)

  • "You guys put me in prison for 30 years.

  • "I don't even know what a Walkman is!

  • (audience laughs)

  • "I just hope I get to meet Elvis, what?

  • "Five minute head start!"

  • (audience laughs)

  • (audience applauds)

  • So you see, this is just part of why

  • people like Barack Obama look up to Nelson Mandela.

  • This is a man who grew up in a country steeped in racism,

  • spent decades in prison fighting it,

  • and then dedicated his life to a world of racial progress.

  • And, most impressively, when he was asked

  • why he's not bitter, he had this to say.

  • - You end up coming out of prison,

  • and there is no bitterness.

  • How is there no bitterness?

  • - Well, I hated oppression.

  • And when I think about the past,

  • the type of things they did, I feel angry.

  • You have a limited time to stay on earth.

  • You must try and use that period

  • for the purpose of transforming your country.

  • - And that's why he's a legend.

  • (audience cheering)

  • You must remember, because of so many

  • of the struggle leaders in South Africa,

  • were either imprisoned or exiled,

  • the movement in South Africa was held together,

  • in large part, by women in the country,

  • and so it's weird for me, because I understand,

  • you travel the world, you understand that everywhere

  • feminism is different, and the idea of women is different,

  • but I grew up in a world that was very matriarchal,

  • and where women were the most dangerous

  • freedom fighters that existed.

  • That is true.

  • You read up on Winnie Mandela,

  • like Nelson Mandela was an icon,

  • but the police in the country were afraid of Winnie Mandela.

  • They were, and we had a phrase in South Africa that was,

  • we still use it today, which was,

  • (speaks in foreign language)

  • which means "You strike a woman, you strike a rock."

  • And that's what I grew up learning.

  • (audience cheering)

  • Kudos, man.

  • It was fire.

  • It was fire, and a lot of the time

  • my mom would strike me with a rock.

  • (audience laughs) (audience applauds)

  • - [Announcer] February 1, 1965.

  • It's the Black History Monty Daily Show.

  • (audience laughs)

  • - Welcome to "The Daily Show."

  • I'm Trevor Noah.

  • My guest tonight, up and coming comedian Bill Cosby.

  • (audience laughs)

  • This guy's jokes are gonna knock you out.

  • (audience laughs)

  • But we begin in Selma, Alabama.

  • If you aren't familiar with Selma,

  • it's a small southern city located 10 miles east

  • of No Negroes Please, and five miles north of Say, Boy!

  • (audience laughs)

  • And it's also where today, recent Nobel Peace Prize winner

  • Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. got into some legal trouble.

  • - [Reporter] Dateline Selma, civil rights leader

  • the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. was arrested today

  • while attempting to lead a mass march of 300 Negroes

  • on the Dallas County courthouse

  • to protest voter registration procedures.

  • The Negroes were taken into custody

  • on charges of parading without a permit.

  • - For more, we go to our

  • junior civil rights correspondent, Roy Wood Sr.

  • Now Roy, what did you see out there?

  • - I saw a bunch of (bleep) Trevor!

  • (audience laughs)

  • Proud Negro men and women being arrested for no reason!

  • - Well now Roy, the police said there was a reason.

  • They were parading without a permit.

  • - Oh, oh, I'm sorry.

  • Did the Klan fill out their paperwork

  • before marching in my neighborhood?

  • (audience laughs)

  • When have you ever seen white people arrested

  • for parading without a permit?

  • - Well Roy, that's just the world we live in.

  • Black people aren't ever gonna get the same treatment

  • as