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  • [Cambry] This is the first car I'll drive in 2019.

  • Should I give you a warning?

  • Ready, set, go!

  • [Music Playing]

  • So if you remember back when I made the off-road wheelchair and surprised Cambry with it, there

  • were a lot of questions in that video of how she can drive a car.

  • Cambry, can you drive a car?

  • [Cambry] Yeah, I just use hand controls.

  • [Zack] Would you like to show everyone how you use these hand controls in a Tesla?

  • [Cambry] Yeah!

  • Let's get started.

  • [Intro]

  • So a lot of people think that Tesla autopilot is a way to get from point A to point B, but

  • that's not quite the case yet.

  • It still requires, you know, a driver.

  • And everything that Cambry needs to drive this car is in this bag.

  • They are called hand controls, and I'm going to show you how they work.

  • [Zack] So this is Cambry's first time actually driving the Tesla, and this particular style

  • of hand controls...every hand control is a bit different and this is more of a temporary

  • solution.

  • [Cambry] The ones in my car are permanently bolted in, and you operate a little bit differently

  • than these ones will.

  • [Zack] But they have the same basic principle.

  • So right now these temporary hand controls are set up around...there's a strap around

  • the steering wheel.

  • This one goes down to the gas pedal.

  • And this one goes down to the brake pedal.

  • So as she grabs this lever right here, pushes in for the brake, and then she pulls back

  • for the gas pedal.

  • And that's how she can drive.

  • Are you ready?

  • [Cambry] I'm ready!

  • [Zack] Let's do it.

  • [Cambry] I feel really nervous.

  • [Zack] Okay!

  • [Cambry] This is the first car I'll drive of 2019.

  • [Zack] It's a good car to start with.

  • Alright, is your seat belt on?

  • Safety first.

  • Explain to us how this setup is different than the setup in your Subaru.

  • [Cambry] In my setup, if I push forward, it's the brake, and down is the gas.

  • But if I go down, nothing's going to happen.

  • So it's just...there's going to be a learning curve.

  • [Zack] Are you ready?

  • Moment of truth.

  • Okay, I'm going to explain how this works.

  • So in order to work this whole thing, make sure the brake's on like it is right now,

  • pressed in.

  • Remember, pulling back towards you is the gas pedal.

  • If you want to put it into park, it's this button right here.

  • If you want it to go into drive, you click it down hard all the way.

  • And that gave us the D right there, which means we are in drive.

  • And so if you release on the brake, like if you just let go of the hand controls for a

  • second...

  • [Cambry] You want me to?

  • [Zack] Yeah.

  • Nothing's going to happen.

  • [Cambry] You tell me after!

  • [Zack] And the reason nothing happened is because here on the display panel, we don't

  • have creep enabled.

  • So the car is never going to roll forward by itself.

  • Now remember, the hand controls are pretty sensitive.

  • So if you pull back slowly, then we'll start inching forward.

  • [Cambry] And there's a chance I might not have to use the brakes as much as I would

  • in my Subaru.

  • [Zack] Exactly, because of the regenerative braking.

  • But you'll...you'll get a feel for that as we go.

  • There you go!

  • [Cambry] Just taking baby steps!

  • 10 miles an hour.

  • [Zack] How does the regenerative braking feel?

  • [Cambry] It's nice.

  • I feel like I'm...like I'm not applying the brakes, but it just feels like it's naturally

  • slowing like I would with a brake.

  • [Zack] You got the hang of this!

  • So regenerative braking is actually pretty awesome.

  • A) you never have to use your brake pads so you hardly ever have to change out components

  • on the Tesla because it's a super simple design.

  • You have your internal motor and then your batteries.

  • There's no oil changes...nothing like that.

  • The nice thing about it is that A) it's slowing down for you, but B) it's also charging the

  • batteries in the Tesla.

  • So you're actually gaining mileage as you're gong down hills or you're coming to a stop.

  • It's using that energy and putting it right back into the batteries again, which is pretty

  • cool.

  • You ready for the acceleration?

  • [Cambry] I can just gun it.

  • [Zack] You're right.

  • Cameras are going.

  • [Cambry] Do you want a verbal warning?

  • Like ready, set, go!

  • [Music Playing]

  • [Zack] Very nice!

  • That is sweet! Phew!

  • So Cambry has the hand controls figured out pretty well.

  • We're going to take it on the freeway and we're going to try out something called autopilot,

  • which is kind of a game changer for the disabled community.

  • A lot of people, like I mentioned before, think autopilot is a way to get from point

  • A to point B, but that's seriously not quite the case yet.

  • Elon Musk, the CEO of Tesla, calls autopilot more of a hands-on system instead of a self-driving

  • system.

  • We're currently on the freeway, and there are pretty well defined lines on either side.

  • And right here there's a little gray indicator saying that the car is ready for autopilot.

  • So we're going to have Cambry just tap twice down on this joystick.

  • This notification is now blue and the car is driving itself.

  • [Cambry] This is...wow!

  • [Zack] How are you feeling?

  • [Cambry] Anxious.

  • [Zack] Ha ha!

  • She's watched me do this, but she's never been the one in control.

  • This is the hands-on self-driving system.

  • Cambry still has to stay alert.

  • So about every 30 seconds or so the car will make sure that the driver is awake and alert

  • by having them apply light force to the steering wheel.

  • But the nice thing is that Cambry doesn't have to use her hand controls when she's in

  • this autopilot mode right now.

  • Her hands are completely free.

  • [Cambry] This is so weird.

  • I'm always using my hands to drive in one way or another, like even with cruise control.

  • Like I can't be free with my hands.

  • [Zack] There's a curve in the road and the car is handling everything for us.

  • It is going around this curve in the road and keeping us a safe distance from other

  • cars.

  • So you can see all the other cars in position around us.

  • So you can see that car in front of us just passed, and you can see it on the screen right

  • there.

  • And then right here it says apply light force to the steering wheel and then it lets you

  • go back into hands-free mode again.

  • Perfect.

  • Very nice.

  • Okay, so we're still in the Tesla.

  • We're going to try out autopilot again here on this road.

  • This one's a little bit more curvy, so we'll see if Cambry likes it.

  • Alright, the green icon is there.

  • Double tap down.

  • Alright, the road is turning.

  • How are you feeling?

  • The car's doing all the work for you.

  • [Cambry] Yeah, well I got nervous the first time it turned on.

  • So we have 3 lanes right now, and because I know this road, it's going to end up in

  • just 2.

  • It's now...oh, I'm not even doing anything, it just did the signal and it moved us over

  • to the other lane.

  • [Zack] Yeah.

  • [Cambry] Okay, that's awesome.

  • And we're still in autonomous driving.

  • I just signaled and it found an opportune time to turn.

  • [Zack] It's way easier than driving a normal car.

  • So what are your thoughts on autopilot?

  • [Cambry] It's a little nerve wracking right now just because I'm not used to it.

  • But it's pretty incredible.

  • [Zack] One of the reasons the Model 3 has such a big screen in the center is so that

  • they can actually watch movies while they are driving down the road.

  • Autonomous driving is still, you know, five or ten years out.

  • There are so many like regulatory approvals they have to go through.

  • Right now if you turn on autopilot, it'll still blow through stop signs and stoplights.

  • So you still have to have a driver making sure the autopilot is not going to mess up.

  • But it's still, you know, pretty fun.

  • The cool thing about owning a Tesla is that it gets constant updates.

  • So right now where the autonomous driving is, you know, pretty much just on the freeway

  • or on roads that have well defined lines.

  • It's going to get improved over the next 5 or 10 years, and this car already has the

  • hardware to get those software updates.

  • It has the cameras and the sensors all around the side.

  • So when fully autonomous driving is finally legal, we won't have to go out and buy a new

  • car.

  • This one just receives a software update and it's ready to go.

  • So one thing people might not think about is when they're parking, obviously handicap

  • parking stalls usually have like a space next to them where the wheelchair can get in and

  • out.