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  • LISA GREEN: OK.

  • Thank you guys.

  • Thanks everyone for coming.

  • First, I'm Lisa Green.

  • I run our Luxury Fashion Group.

  • And I'm thrilled to have these four guys here

  • to talk to us today about how shopping has changed

  • in the modern day, and give any advice that any of you guys

  • have about that specific topic.

  • So we'll go ahead and start with Lauren.

  • And then we'll just go down the line.

  • LAUREN SHERMAN: My name's Lauren Sherman.

  • I am Fashionista's editor-at-large.

  • I'm a freelance writer as well.

  • And I write for a bunch of different publications.

  • My expertise is kind of the intersection

  • of fashion and business.

  • So I write for consumer publications.

  • I write for business publications, trade

  • and-- So I've been covering this stuff for about 10 years.

  • And e-commerce is obviously a big part of my beat.

  • So I guess that's basically it.

  • LEAH CHERNIKOFF: Hi.

  • I'm Leah Chernikoff.

  • I'm the editor of Elle.com.

  • So that means I oversee all editorial, content, strategy.

  • Before that I was at Fashionista with Lauren.

  • She hired me.

  • And before that, I was a reporter at the Daily News,

  • covering features.

  • And then I focused on fashion from there.

  • And also decided to go digital, when,

  • I think I experienced the fourth round of layoffs.

  • So I'm happy to be online.

  • And so-- yeah, my expertise is more

  • of sort of a general view on fashion,

  • and having watched, sort of, things

  • go from analog to digital.

  • LISA GREEN: You've got it.

  • STEVEN ALAN: Hi I'm Steven Alan.

  • And I started my company about 20 years ago.

  • And started as a multi-brand retailer and then from there

  • started representing designers, and then from there,

  • started manufacturing.

  • And today, we do all three, kind of three businesses

  • within a business.

  • And I think each business is very much complementary

  • to the other business.

  • BRETT HEYMAN: Thank you.

  • Hi, my name is Brett Heyman.

  • I have a brand of handbags called Edie.

  • Parker, which I launched about four years ago.

  • And before that, I had a PR background.

  • I worked in PR for Gucci and Dolce Gabbana covering

  • accessories, mostly, and ready-to-wear.

  • LISA GREEN: Cool.

  • Well thank you guys.

  • Thank you again for being here.

  • We're just going to kick it off by asking

  • what the strangest thing that you've ever bought online is?

  • So, Steven, we'll start with you.

  • STEVEN ALAN: I remember buying a car online,

  • which for me was pretty weird.

  • Without seeing it, and it was on eBay,

  • and it was one of those bidding things--

  • And it was a particular-- it wasn't

  • any amazing-- it was just an old Volvo.

  • But I wanted a stick-shift.

  • And so I ended up going up to Pittsburgh and picking it up .

  • It wasn't that weird but--

  • LISA GREEN: It's a big purchase.

  • STEVEN ALAN: Yeah, it was a big purchase.

  • 00:02:50,468 --> 00:02:51,216 LISA GREEN: Brett.

  • You want to go?

  • BRETT HEYMAN: Well, I'm excited to hear that because I'm

  • mulling over a Grand Wagoneer online, and through eBay Auto.

  • So I'm happy that it worked for you.

  • I don't think I buy a lot of weird stuff.

  • But I do buy a lot of geodes and rocks,

  • and I buy them all online on eBay.

  • LISA GREEN: Well, I'm just going throw in what my weirdest

  • thing was-- to maybe help you guys

  • along the continuum of weird-- I once bought a smitten, which

  • was actually a glove for two people.

  • So that you could hold hands--

  • [LAUGHTER]

  • --while walking down the street.

  • It's really-- I've been married for 10 years.

  • So clearly that was more than 10 years ago.

  • [LAUGHTER]

  • LEAH CHERNIKOFF: We were talking about this before.

  • I'm like kind of co-opting my boyfriend because he

  • buys a lot of weird drugs online.

  • [LAUGHTER]

  • And, they come in like strange--

  • LISA GREEN: Remember, we are video'ing this.

  • LEAH CHERNIKOFF: Yeah, that's fine.

  • They're all legal.

  • [LAUGHTER]

  • LAUREN SHERMAN: Now, I really want

  • to know what kind of legal drugs?

  • Is it like through Canada or something?

  • [LAUGHTER]

  • LEAH CHERNIKOFF: [INAUDIBLE] from Asia.

  • LAUREN SHERMAN: Oh, interesting.

  • OK.

  • We can talk about this offline.

  • I think the weirdest thing I've ever bought

  • is like a dog DNA test.

  • I don't know if that's that weird though.

  • I mean, you guys are doing stuff like that now.

  • LISA GREEN: It's weird.

  • LAUREN SHERMAN: And I've tried to buy my own DNA test.

  • But there are weird rules in New York.

  • And I've also bought like, the "National Geographic."

  • It's like the "23 and Me" thing, but what they do.

  • And it's $100 bucks.

  • But the doggie DNA was probably the weirdest.

  • And it confirmed what we already knew.

  • So it was also a waste of money, but--

  • [LAUGHTER]

  • --it was good.

  • STEVEN ALAN: What was that "National Geographic"?

  • I'm just curious about that.

  • LEAH CHERNIKOFF: It's all about her ancestors.

  • LAUREN SHERMAN: You like-- it's another story.

  • It's too long.

  • But, you like-- they take your DNA.

  • And they find out one-- I think it's

  • like your grandmother's grandmother.

  • Or guys can do-- women can't do the guy's lineage too--

  • but you can find out like one path of your lineage.

  • And again, it was everything that I already knew.

  • It was not-- there was nothing exciting in there, except one.

  • But yeah.

  • So.

  • 00:04:59,384 --> 00:05:00,000 LISA GREEN: All right.

  • Well, thanks guys.

  • Now, the rest of this is gonna be so boring in comparison.

  • But, let's just start pretty general with what's

  • the biggest change that you see in the way people are shopping?

  • Leah, you've got the mike, so why don't you--

  • LEAH CHERNIKOFF: Um, I think what I've noticed most,

  • and what I'm guilty of myself, with everything being online

  • now, is if you see one thing online,

  • I immediately go to like 10 other sites

  • to see which site has it at the cheapest price point.

  • So I think that's really changing

  • the way-- people aren't just maybe going

  • to one online shopping destination.

  • But sort of scoping it out.

  • I don't know.

  • We were talking about the death of Huckster,

  • but that's kind of what that did, right?

  • LISA GREEN: If anybody else has anything to add,

  • or we could move on to the next.

  • You've got something, Steven?

  • STEVEN ALAN: No.

  • Go ahead.

  • LISA GREEN: Nothing?

  • OK.

  • In terms of devices, I think that's kind of

  • been the big theme lately is, we're all

  • talking about being multi-screen and going from one device

  • to the next, and kind of switching it all up?

  • Which one do you think has become the most influential

  • on purchase decisions?

  • So not necessarily which one is the one with the last click,

  • because I think that we're all aware of what that is.

  • But what do you think?

  • You know, from TV to a magazine, to a phone, to a computer,

  • to a billboard, to in-store signage-- what

  • do you think really has the most influence on purchasing

  • decisions?

  • 00:06:27,080 --> 00:06:27,579 Steven.

  • STEVEN ALAN: I think that, I mean,

  • mobile is definitely the most important thing.

  • And I think that now what we're seeing

  • is definitely sort of the tablet gaining more and more strength

  • compared to the phone.

  • Just because people are just able to carry it around in.

  • They're smaller.

  • And even the phones are becoming more like tablets.

  • So the line is getting blurred.

  • LISA GREEN: The phablet?

  • STEVEN ALAN: Yeah.

  • I guess.

  • LISA GREEN: Anything else you guys think?

  • Like, why do you think mobile and tablet are becoming so big?

  • LAUREN SHERMAN: Yeah.

  • Obviously I agree that mobile is huge.

  • I just did a story this weekend on buying fine jewelry online,

  • for the "Wall Street Journal"'s Weekend Section.

  • And a lot of these fine jewelry retailers-- people

  • are buying $60,000 pairs of earrings on their phone.

  • And I mean, that's been happening in Asia for years.

  • But now it's becoming more prevalent here.

  • But I also think that the phone and the tablet connect you.

  • If you're in the store and you see something-- and all

  • this cross-channel stuff that people call Omni Channel

  • or whatever-- is those things are the connectors.

  • So whether that means going into a store

  • and them having tablets for you to buy more stuff.

  • Or that means you looking on your phone, that's

  • the thing that's really connecting us,

  • is the mobile aspect of it.

  • And

  • LISA GREEN: And what do you guys think is that big opportunity?

  • I think Lauren makes a really good point about how

  • mobile kind of connects you while you're in store.

  • If you could sort of create-- Steven,

  • maybe for you in your stores?

  • How do you feel like your-- you guys should be using mobile

  • once somebody is already there?

  • STEVEN ALAN: We do.

  • I mean we have iPads in the stores.

  • And people come in the store and then,

  • if we don't have something, then usually the associate

  • will go online and see if we have it online.

  • Then they'll be able to help them and complete

  • that purchase online.

  • Or, if another store has it, again they

  • can check inventory with the same app at and other stores,

  • and sell that.

  • Had

  • LAUREN SHERMAN: Yeah, it's such a simple thing.

  • But my husband's a big fan of Steven's stuff.

  • And he-- that, like, sea-green sweatshirt you guys

  • did for spring?

  • He really wanted it.

  • But it was sold out on his size online.

  • And it said on there that it was available in the Tribeca store.

  • So he went there.

  • That's something that's been around for a long time.

  • But I feel like people are really using it now.

  • Whereas maybe five years ago, he wouldn't have even thought

  • of checking to see if it was available in a store,

  • or he would have picked up the phone and called,

  • instead of figuring it online.

  • STEVEN ALAN: That's also-- I mean,

  • for us, that was definitely like 101, was being able to do that.

  • And if we didn't have it online, just have it pop up and say,

  • sorry we're out of that.

  • But we have it.

  • And it would be by the SKU.

  • So it won't tell you to call a store if they don't actually

  • have that size in that item.

  • But then, 2.0 would definitely be--

  • online would actually just start scanning all the stores.

  • And then be able to just continue that order without you

  • having to call the store and have the store ship it

  • to you and all that stuff.

  • The store would still do that.

  • But you wouldn't necessarily know that.

  • And so I think that for me, as a retailer

  • I want to really make that whole experience as seamless

  • as possible.

  • So sometimes you don't want to even necessarily buy it.

  • You want to kind of see it, or touch it, or f