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  • Hi, my name's Olivier.

  • Welcome to Oxford Online English!

  • Let's take a tour of London.

  • Have you been to London before?

  • If so, what did you do?

  • If not, what would you most like to see?

  • In this lesson, you'll go on a tour of London.

  • You'll learn useful language to deal with common tourist situations, like buying tickets,

  • going to museums or talking to taxi drivers.

  • Before we start, don't forget to check out our website: Oxford Online English dot com.

  • We have many free lessons to help you practise and improve your English, and you can also

  • study in one-to-one classes with one of our professional teachers.

  • But now, here's an interesting fact: last year, London was the second most visited city

  • anywhere in the world, with nearly 20 million visitors.

  • Which city do you think was number one?

  • Don't cheat by looking it up; we'll tell you at the end of the video.

  • Anyway, don't worry about that for now.

  • Let's take a tour of London.

  • Where shall we go first?

  • Hi, good morning.

  • Hi.

  • Can I help you?

  • My friends and I are thinking of doing your bus tour tomorrow.

  • Could you tell me more about the route and where we'll go?

  • Actually, we offer many different routes.

  • Is there anything in particular you'd like to see?

  • Well, I think we want the classic London experience: Big Ben, the Tower of London, and so on.

  • In that case I'd recommend our original route.

  • It starts and ends at Grosvenor Gardens, just near Buckingham Palace.

  • You'll cross the river by the Houses of Parliament, then back again near the London

  • Eye.

  • You'll also go past the Tower of London, St Paul's Cathedral, and several other London

  • landmarks.

  • That sounds good.

  • How long does it take?

  • The whole route takes about two hours, but it's a hop on-hop off tour, so you can get

  • off wherever you want.

  • And how much are tickets?

  • If you book online, they're 25 pounds each, or 35 if you buy from the driver.

  • Do you do any kind of group discount?

  • We offer a family ticket, which includes two adults and two children.

  • I'm travelling with friends, so I guess that's no good.

  • I just have one more question: is there a guide, or an audio guide?

  • There's a live guide, who speaks English.

  • If any of your group want a tour in another language, we have audio guides available in

  • 11 different languages at no extra cost.

  • That sounds great.

  • Thanks for your help!

  • First question: can you name five famous London landmarks?

  • If you don't know, 'landmarks' means famous places.

  • For example, the Eiffel Tower is possibly the best-known Paris landmark.

  • So, can you name five London landmarks?

  • You heard several examples in the dialogue.

  • Here are the examples you heard before: Buckingham Palace, the Houses of Parliament, the London

  • Eye, the Tower of London and St Paul's Cathedral.

  • You could mention others, like Marble Arch, Trafalgar Square, Hyde Park, or famous football

  • stadia like The Emirates or Wembley.

  • In the dialogue, I was asking questions about a bus tour of the city.

  • Can you remember any of the questions I asked?

  • You heard: 'Could you tell me more about the route and where we'll go?'

  • 'How long does it take?'

  • 'How much are tickets?'

  • 'Do you do any kind of group discount?'

  • 'Is there a guide, or an audio guide?'

  • You could ask these questions in many common travel situations; they aren't only useful

  • when booking a tour bus!

  • For example, you could make questions like this: 'Could you tell me more about the

  • tour, and what's included?'

  • 'How much is the transport?'

  • 'Do you do any kind of student discounts?'

  • The bus tour we were talking about is 'hop on/hop off'.

  • This means you can get off the bus to visit places on the way, and then get back on another

  • bus later.

  • Let's make our first stop, and go to one of London's famous museums.

  • Good morning, welcome to the Tate Modern.

  • Good morning.

  • I'd like four tickets please.

  • Actually, general admission to the Tate modern is free; you just have to pay separately for

  • the exhibitions.

  • Oh

  • Great!

  • I didn't realise that.

  • What do you have on at the moment?

  • We have a wonderful Picasso exhibition, which I'd highly recommend.

  • We also have exhibitions by Franz West and Dorothea Tanning.

  • I'd love to see the Picasso exhibition.

  • How much are the tickets?

  • They're eighteen pounds for adults and five pounds for children under 18.

  • We also have a 7-year-old with us.

  • Do we need a ticket for him?

  • No, under-12s get in free.

  • OK, so two adults and one child then, please.

  • What time would you like the ticket for?

  • Excuse me?

  • With exhibitions, especially popular ones like the Picasso, your ticket is for a specific

  • time.

  • There's a 30-minute slot, and you have to enter the exhibition hall within that time.

  • You mean, I only get 30 minutes to look around?!

  • That's not long enough!

  • No, no!

  • You can stay as long as you like; it just regulates when you can go in.

  • I see!

  • In that case, what times are available?

  • Well, it's 10.45 now.

  • I could give you tickets for the eleven to eleven-thirty entrance slot.

  • That's fine.

  • That's £36, please.

  • Do you take euros?

  • I'm afraid not.

  • I'll pay by card, then.

  • Do you like going to art galleries or museums?

  • Which London museums have you heard of?

  • The Tate Modern, which you heard about in the dialogue, is a famous modern art museum.

  • There are many other well-known London museums, such as the British Museum, the National Gallery,

  • or the Natural History Museum.

  • For now, let's look at some useful language from the dialogue.

  • Near the beginning, you heard this question: 'What do you have on at the moment?'

  • Do you know what this means?

  • 'On' refers to an event, performance, or exhibition which is happening now.

  • You can use it in different situations; for example, at the cinema:

  • 'What films are on at the moment?'

  • At the theatre: 'Are there any good plays on?'

  • Or, at a museum: 'There's a really interesting exhibition on at the Science Museum.'

  • You also heard some more useful questions related to buying tickets; for example: 'Do

  • we need a ticket for him?'

  • 'What times are available?'

  • 'Do you take euros?'

  • Like much of the language in this lesson, you can adapt these for different situations,

  • like this: 'Do we need a ticket for my son?'

  • 'What kind of rooms are available?'

  • 'Do you take dollars?'

  • Hi, how can I help you?

  • Hello!

  • We haven't planned this very well, but we decided this morning we wanted to see a show

  • while we are here, and thought it might be possible to get some cheap last-minute tickets.

  • Any idea of what you want to see?

  • No, I don't even know what's on right now, actually.

  • Well, were you thinking a musical, or a play?

  • I think… a musical.

  • It'll be more fun for the kids.

  • Here, take a look at this.

  • These are the musicals we have on at the moment.

  • I really don't know.

  • Can you recommend something?

  • How old are your children?

  • Five and nine.

  • I think the Lion King would be perfect.

  • It's one of our longest running shows, and it's good fun.

  • That sounds perfect!

  • How much are the tickets?

  • Well, first of all, what time would you like to go?

  • We have matinee and evening tickets available.

  • The matinee tickets are slightly cheaper.

  • What time is the matinee?

  • It's at two-thirty, so in about an hour.

  • The evening performance is at seven-thirty.

  • Two-thirty is too soon.

  • I guess it'll have to be the evening.

  • OK, evening it is.

  • The second question is: where would you like to sit?

  • You can choose from stalls, Royal Circle or Grand Circle.

  • Take a look at this seating plan.

  • Hmm

  • We're kind of on a budget.

  • Which tickets are the cheapest?

  • You could sit in the Grand Circle, near the back.

  • We have four seats together, just here.

  • How much would they be?

  • Normally, they're eighty pounds each, but because it's last minute, they're down

  • to forty-five.

  • Is it cheaper for children?

  • No, I'm afraid not.

  • All tickets are the same price.

  • Alright, I guess we won't get another chance anytime soon.

  • We'll take them!

  • Look at five words and phrases which you heard in the dialogue.

  • They're all connected with going to the theatre.

  • Do you know what these words mean?

  • How would you explain the meaning?

  • If you're on a budget, you might want to look for last-minute tickets.

  • You might buy last-minute tickets close to the time of the show you want to see.

  • Last-minute tickets are often cheaper.

  • You can use 'last-minute' to talk about other things as well; for example, last-minute

  • plane tickets, or a last-minute hotel booking.

  • A musical is a playor a filmwhich includes songs and dancing routines.

  • Can you think of any other famous musicals?

  • A 'matinee' is a performance which starts earlier in the day, usually in the afternoon.

  • You can also use the word 'matinee' to talk about films at the cinema.

  • A typical theatre has two types of seating: stalls and circle.

  • The stalls are the seats in front of the stage, and at the same level.

  • The circle is higher and further back, so seats in the circle tend to be cheaper.

  • Now, you've been looking around London all day, and you're feeling tired.

  • It's time to jump in a taxi and go back to your hotel.

  • Where to?

  • Excuse me?

  • Where are you going?

  • Oh, sorry.

  • Trafalgar Square, please.

  • Do you know how much it will be?

  • It's all on the meter, but should be around £25.

  • OK, that's fine.

  • How's your day going?

  • Typical Saturday, innit?

  • Very busy, but can't complain.

  • Are you just here visiting?

  • Yeah, I'm from the US.

  • Are you from London originally?

  • Yep.

  • Proper Londoner.

  • Born and bred here.

  • So, you like it here?

  • It's a blinding place to live.

  • Oh, right.

  • Obviously there a few places that are a little dodgy, but I think you get that in any big

  • city.

  • Of course.

  • I mean, it just does my nut when people talk about how dangerous London has become.

  • Well

  • Yes

  • I mean you've got to say the old bill do a good job around here.

  • The old who?

  • The old bill.

  • That's what we call the police here.

  • Ahactually could you drop me off here?

  • I'd like to walk down The Mall.

  • Yeah, no problem.

  • That's 25 quid please.

  • If you didn't understand all of that, don't worry.

  • We included some colloquial words and phrases that are typical in London.

  • Have you heard any of these before?

  • 'Innit' is used instead of question tags like 'are you?' or 'doesn't it?'

  • For example, instead of 'The weather looks nice, doesn't it?' you might hear 'The

  • weather looks nice, innit?'

  • This is colloquial, and as an English learner you probably shouldn't use it, but you might

  • hear it in the UK.

  • 'Blinding' is a slang word which means 'very good'.

  • On the other hand, something which is 'dodgy' is not good at all.

  • 'Dodgy' means that something is wrong.

  • If you describe a person as dodgy, you mean that this person shouldn't be trusted.

  • If you talk about a dodgy area of a city, you're talking about an area which isn't

  • always safe to walk around.

  • If something 'does your nut', it annoys you.

  • For example, you could say 'This music really does my nut.'

  • Again, this is very colloquial!

  • Use it for fun if you want, but expect people to give you some strange looks.

  • The 'old bill', as you heard, are the police.

  • This is London-specific slang.

  • Finally, 'quid' is another word for 'pounds'.

  • This is common, and you'll probably hear it if you visit the UK.

  • So, if something costs ten pounds, you can say that it costs ten quid instead.

  • 'Quid' is too colloquial to use in writing; also, 'quid' doesn't change in the plural:

  • one quid, two quid, three quid