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  • Hello.

  • Hi.

  • What's your name?

  • My name's Kasia, and you are?

  • My name's Olivier.

  • Nice to meet you.

  • And you.

  • What are we doing in this lesson?

  • We're going to talk about greetings and introductions in English.

  • Hi.

  • I'm Olivier.

  • Welcome to Oxford Online English.

  • What's the first word you learned in English?

  • Probably 'hello', right?

  • 'Hello' is the most basic way to greet someone in English.

  • There are many different ways to greet people and introduce yourself in English.

  • In different situations, you'll need to use different words and phrases to greet people

  • or make introductions.

  • In this lesson, you can learn about greetings and introductions in English and see which

  • language you should use in different situations.

  • Imagine that you're on a business trip, and you're meeting some important clients

  • for the first time.

  • Or maybe you work in service, for example in a hotel, and you need to talk to guests

  • and customers.

  • In these situations, you'll want to use more formal language.

  • Good morning!

  • You must be Olivier.

  • Yes, good morning!

  • I'm sorry, and your name is…?

  • My name's Kasia.

  • Very nice to meet you.

  • Welcome to Madrid!

  • Thank you.

  • How are you today?

  • Very well, thank you, and yourself?

  • I'm good, thanks for asking.

  • This dialogue uses more formal language.

  • Can you see what makes it formal?

  • First, I started by saying good morning.

  • The greetings good morning, good afternoon and good evening are quite formal and are

  • generally only used in formal situations.

  • There's one exception: you can sometimes use good morning informally with people you

  • know.

  • However, it's common in this situation to simply say 'morning'.

  • Can you see any other examples of formal language in this dialogue?

  • There are many.

  • Firstly, I asked Kasia's name by saying, and your name is…?

  • This is more formal than asking what's your name?

  • After she introduced herself, Kasia said very nice to meet you.

  • Saying nice to meet you is neutralneither formal nor informal.

  • However, adding very makes it sound much more formal.

  • One word can make a big difference!

  • I introduced myself with a full sentence: My name's Kasia.

  • When speaking less formally, you'd use a shorter introduction, like I'm Kasia or

  • just Kasia.

  • After I introduced myself, I said Welcome to Madrid.

  • Does this sound formal or informal to you?

  • It's quite formal.

  • Do you know why it's formal?

  • Again, it's a small change which makes a big difference.

  • Saying welcome by itself is neutralit's not formal.

  • However, adding to and a place makes it sound much more formal.

  • So, if you say, Welcome to our office! that sounds formal, while if you just say, Welcome!

  • it doesn't sound so formal.

  • It's common when greeting someone in English to ask some kind of how are you question.

  • Do you remember what Kasia asked me?

  • She asked How are you today?

  • Again, one word makes the differencedo you know which one?

  • It's today.

  • Asking how are you is neutral.

  • Adding today makes it sound more formal.

  • My answer, Very well, thank you, also sounds quite formal.

  • If I was speaking more neutrally, I'd say something like, Well, thanks.

  • Adding very and saying thank you instead of thanks makes it sound more formal.

  • Finally, Olivier asked me how are you back.

  • Do you remember how he did it?

  • He asked, and yourself?

  • This is more formal than asking and you?

  • I replied and said thanks for asking.

  • You wouldn't say thanks for asking in a more informal situation.

  • So, you've seen here how small changes can make a big difference to how formal your language

  • sounds.

  • Remember that formality doesn't just depend on the words you use; other things like tone

  • of voice and body language are also important.

  • Next, let's look at how to handle greetings and introductions in a neutral way.

  • 'Neutral' means neither formal nor informal.

  • For example, imagine you're at work, and you meet a new colleague.

  • You're the same age and you're in the same department.

  • This is an example of a neutral situation.

  • You don't need to be very formal, but you also wouldn't want to sound too casual.

  • Hello!

  • Hello!

  • Are you Olivier?

  • Yes, that's right.

  • What's your name?

  • Kasia.

  • Nice to meet you.

  • And you.

  • How are you?

  • Fine, thanks, and you?

  • I'm good, thanks.

  • First, compare this dialogue to the formal one from part one.

  • They follow the same pattern, but this dialogue is much less formal.

  • Can you see the differences?

  • First, we started with a neutral greeting, hello.

  • You can use hello in any situation.

  • Then, I asked Olivier his name with a simple question, What's your name?

  • Hello, what's your namepretty easy, right?

  • That's because neutral language is generally the simplest language.

  • If you compare the two dialogues, you can see that this neutral dialogue is shorter

  • than the formal dialogue you saw in part one.

  • This is very common: formal language is often longer and more complex.

  • Neutral language is short and simple.

  • You can see this throughout the dialogue: we use the basic words and phrases that you

  • probably learned in lesson one of your English classes at school: nice to meet you; how are

  • you; fine, thanks; and so on.

  • Okay, so now you've learned about the differences between formal and neutral greetings and introductions.

  • What about informal greetings and introductions?

  • Informal greetings and introductions are useful if you know someone well, or if you're meeting

  • someone in a casual situation.

  • For example, if you're hanging out with some friends, and your friends introduce you

  • to one of their friends, you would probably use informal language.

  • Let's see how this works:

  • Hi!

  • Hey!

  • Olivier?

  • Yeah.

  • Your name?

  • Kasia.

  • Good to meet you.

  • You too.

  • How you doing?

  • Yeah, not bad.

  • You?

  • Pretty good!

  • So, what do you notice here?

  • The first thing you can see is that the dialogue is even shorter than the neutral dialogue

  • you saw in part two.

  • We both used a lot of short questions and sentences.

  • For example:

  • Olivier?

  • Your name?

  • How you doing?

  • You?

  • These are fine in informal speech, and native speakers often shorten sentences and questions

  • like this.

  • However, you wouldn't do this in a more formal situation.

  • There are also several phrases which you wouldn't use in a more formal setting, such as:

  • Hi/Hey Yeah

  • Not bad Pretty good

  • These are all good words and phrases to use in an informal situation.

  • At this point, you could go back and review the three dialogues.

  • Each dialogue has exactly the same structureonly the language is different.

  • See how you can use different words and phrases to greet people and introduce yourself with

  • different levels of formality.

  • Okay?

  • Let's look at one more thing.

  • When you're making introductions, you might also need to introduce another person.

  • Let's see how you can do that in formal, neutral, or informal ways.

  • Here's a very formal introduction.

  • Let me introduce my colleague, Kasia.

  • Here's another very formal way to introduce someone:

  • May I introduce my colleague, Olivier?

  • What about neutral introductions?

  • This is Kasia.

  • Here's another way to make in introduction using neutral language.

  • Have you met Olivier?

  • Finally, what about informal introductions?

  • In informal situations, you might not introduce people at all.

  • You might just let them introduce themselves, or you might prompt them to introduce themselves

  • by asking something like:

  • Have you guys met?

  • Do you two know each other?

  • If you want to make an informal introduction, the most common way is just to say the two

  • people's names, then say them again in reverse.

  • For example, imagine you're introducing two people called John and Emma to each other.

  • You could say:

  • John, Emma.

  • Emma, John.

  • So now, you should understand how to greet people and introduce yourself or someone else

  • in different situations.

  • Do you want more practice with this topic?

  • Check out the full version of this lesson on our website: Oxford Online English.com.

  • See you next time!

  • Thanks for watching!

Hello.

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A2 US formal neutral olivier informal introduce dialogue

English Greetings and Introductions - Spoken English

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    Courage posted on 2019/10/29
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