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  • I sure haven't made one of these in a while, have I? Well, it's 2019, and you know there's

  • a lot of yuri manga right now, some of them mediocre but many of them great, so let's

  • get right to this, and try not to skip around or leave the video, because many of the best

  • are on the backend. I'll only be listing series with an English translation, will put

  • details on-screen if they're licensed, and have timestamps in the description, so let's

  • go. Starting off we've got Bloom into You, the

  • ongoing classic that everyone is surely already aware of. The series is wrapping up by the

  • end of this year, so if you somehow haven't jumped on it, or were waiting for its completion,

  • now's the time. Its recent handling of the characters is just as strong as ever, and

  • no aspect of the series, from its art to its paneling, has taken even the slightest dip

  • with time. Nakatani-sensei's work has played a major role in the current popularization

  • of this genre, and any fan owes it to themselves and to her to go read this.

  • Shimeji Simulation is the newest manga by the author of Girls' Last Tour, and yes,

  • you heard that right. It's a 4-panel gag series, so don't expect any serious material

  • here, but the yuri is most assuredly real. If you want some idea of what to expect, imagine

  • the most absurd moments of Girls' Last Tour, and turn that dial in your mind all the way

  • up to 11. Its surreal depiction of nihilism and depression feels perfectly fitting, and

  • honestly the main relationship is even kinda cute in spite of how bizarre it all is. I

  • can't promise that GLT fans will like it, but they should at least give it a shot.

  • Yuri is My Job is like if Blend-S was good, and by that I mean it's set at a “yuri

  • cafewhere all of the waitresses perform the roles of classic yuri archetypes, and

  • our main character is roped into this against her will after injuring the manager, which

  • probably isn't legal but ah well. This focus on performance brings up important questions

  • of how well we can know others and even ourselves, and its writing is incredibly deft for what

  • could otherwise be a very schlocky series. Poking fun at voyeurism is a classic premise

  • going back at least as far as Hitchcock, and it works to great effect here both in creating

  • drama and in delivering a satisfying yuri romance.

  • Liberty is exactly what we all need: a serious musical drama manga about two adult women.

  • Now, I know that Octave, After Hours, and even another manga further down this list

  • count, but this one's got its own appeal. Written by Izumi Kitta, who's a relatively

  • well-known voice actress, it stars that classic yuri pair: a bored and somewhat detached games

  • writer who finds herself pursued by the up-and-coming singer of a band she's working with, after

  • almost running over her in her car. Said singer is sometimes a bitpushy when it comes

  • to her advances, but it's more than reciprocated, and is just one of many fantastic series on

  • this list about adults. Urasekai Picnic, or, Otherside Picnic, is

  • an adaptation of a light novel by Iori Miyazawa, whose interesting interview will be linked

  • in the description. Part of a new wave of yuri stories, it's a science-fiction work

  • taking a neo-Lovecraftian bent, where the main characters find themselves capable of

  • accessing the titular Urasekai, meaning Reverse World, and attempting to discover how it and

  • its dangerous oddities function, all alongside strong yuri drama. It's a series named after

  • the novel which inspired Stalker, so, I think that should be enough of a selling point.

  • It isn't licensed, but the novels are, so you can read those soon if legality is important

  • to you. Next up we've got Kase-san. As with Bloom,

  • this shouldn't need to be one I need to say too much about, but I've seen the strange

  • rumor going around that it's over, and it isn't. It just isn't. Anyway, with that

  • clarified, let's talk shop. While the release rate has slowed down, it's been worth it,

  • as Kase and Yamada contend with the newfound challenges of work, college, and living further

  • away from one another. Their relationship is only strengthening with these new hurdles

  • to clear, and damn are they clearing them. Also, Kase is really hot when she dresses

  • up, and I just wanted you to know that. Otona ni Natte mo, or, Even Though We're

  • Adults is about an utterly repulsive and captivating woman who cheats on her husband with a girl

  • she meets at a bar. It's not pleasant, but it's pretty realistic as to the troubles

  • of a relationship, and its handled wonderfully by the same mind who brought us Wandering

  • Son and Sweet Blue Flowers, Takako Shimura. It's still in its early days, but for those

  • who clamor for a serious, adult drama about two grown-up women, this is exactly what you

  • want, even running in a josei magazine. For those interested in reading fluff, and those

  • who can't feel a drop of sympathy for a cheater: turn elsewhere.

  • Watashi no Kawaii Koneko-chan, or, My Cute Little Kitten is the latest manga from Milk

  • Morinaga, a name that should need no introduction but will get some anyway: she's the author

  • of Girl Friends. In her first series depicting two adult women(noticing a trend in the contemporary

  • yuri market?) she portrays two roommates, both of whom have feelings for one another

  • but find difficulty in spitting that out. It is, for the most part, a very Milk Morinaga

  • story, with an overflowing of shoujo style and a plethora of misunderstandings, but its

  • focus on adult roommates gives it a different tone, enough so to make it worth reading.

  • Still Sick is another popular genre of adult yuri romancethat of the office coworkers.

  • Did that specific subgenre pop up, in spite of the relative infrequency of dating coworkers,

  • because it duplicates the school dynamic in many ways, complete with senpai/kohai? Probably.

  • Anyway, it stars a doujin manga artist who's caught drawing yuri by her colleague at Comiket,

  • or maybe some yuri event I can't remember, a fact which is used to blackmail her into

  • becoming friends. It's frankly shockingly funny, and for anyone who enjoys stories about

  • following your artistic passions, this is a good one.

  • Hayama-sensei and Terano-sensei are dating is exactly what it says, a fluffy romance

  • about two teachers who also happen to be dating. Unlike many of the previous manga on this

  • list, there is nothing here for you if you are a grouch who doesn't enjoy cute girls

  • being cute and sapphic with one another from time to time. To soapbox for a second, I'm

  • happy we've reached this point. There was a time where all fluff was in schoolgirl series

  • and romance with adults had to be dramatic, but that time has passed, and going off this

  • list, it'd be hard to claim yuri has too many more schoolgirl stories than manga romance

  • as a whole. Go us! Tsukiatte agete mo ii ka na, translated as,

  • So, Do You Want to Go Out, or, is not just a mouthful, but absolutely, searingly good.

  • A college mangaman I love thoseit stars two young women who just kinda lapse into

  • a relationship because both are open, rather than out of some blinding passion. It's

  • nice, even with all the drama that comes with. More importantly, it's legitimately laugh

  • my posterior off funnysorry for the censoring, gotta play to the adsense algorithmsthough

  • much of that comes down to the translation work; it's nice to get a translator who's

  • willing to use modern slang when it's appropriate. Five stars, must read for all.

  • Sasayaku You Ni Koi Wo Utau, or, Whispering You a Love Song is the kind of manga which

  • is shockingly rare on this list, a simple girl meets girl love story set at a school,

  • and yet it doesn't feel at all out of place. When a young woman immediately falls in love

  • with the performance of her senpai at her class reception, she promptly tries to tell

  • her thatbut ends up wording it like a confession. The senpai is enraptured with

  • her right then and there, which is what begins this absurdly adorable little romance. Detailed

  • lineart makes for very cute characters, whether troubled or over the moon. It's a classic

  • formula, but there's a reason it became that way, because it's still good.

  • My Next Life as a Villainess: All Routes Lead to Doom! is universally, and by universally

  • I mean in the West, called BakaRina, because the main character's name is Katarina and

  • she's a complete idiot. Reincarnated into the world of an otome game she played once,

  • it stars the purest girl who has ever lived, someone who only and always does right by

  • those she cares about. Because of that, she accrues quite a harem, three members of which

  • are girls. There's plenty of guys in love with her too, so if you're more of the separatist

  • variety this might not be in your strikezone, but given that she's unlikely to end up

  • with any one person, this should satisfy yuri fans who want a bit of isekai mixed in.

  • Kimi ga Shinu Made Koi wo Shitai, or, I Want You to Love Me Until I Die is a fantastical

  • horror series, where a magic academy employs young girls to fight and often die against

  • some unknown enemy. Very little is clear in this series, and that includes my opinions

  • on it! It's strange, and even the relationships, constructed as they are by the school for

  • the sake of their operations, do not feel the most genuine. But maybe that's the point.

  • I feel legitimately unnerved reading this manga, especially when its more gory bits

  • come in, and it's certainly yuri, so if that sounds up your alley, it probably is.

  • Cheerful Amnesia has been recommended before, but I'm gonna do it again. Another four-panel

  • gag comedy, this one involves a girl who loses her memory and yet is still intensely attracted

  • to her former girlfriend. Things have progressed since the time I last mentioned it, and while

  • I won't spoil too much, I will say that it feels like a manga that plans on wrapping

  • up on the sooner end of things, so I'd jump on it now. It remains hilarious and with its

  • progress has avoided dwelling too long on jokes that may have gotten stale. Go read

  • it and thank me for doing so. Motto Hanjuku Joshi is exactly what it sounds

  • like: more Hanjuku Joshi. Said Hanjuku Joshi comes from Morishima Akiko, one of the most

  • esteemed mangaka in the genre, and the fact that we're getting more of it after a decade

  • speaks to how blessed we are as a people, so if you focus on yuri alone and not literally

  • anything else in the world, it seems like we're moving to a great place! As with its

  • predecessor series, it's funny, it's round, and it's a damn good time. Morishima follows

  • up on threads that were never quite tied in the original, while still letting its main

  • girls be mostly happy, since they solved their problems in the past. This is how you do a

  • sequel. Lily Marble is strange, but it's a good

  • one. Its art style may not appeal to everyone, but a glance at it should show it's for

  • those of truly discerning taste. Centering a number of women who work at a gym, it shows

  • various couples and pairings, while also demonstrating the fact that the members of those pairings

  • have other friends, and lives, and other silly things like that. Perhaps more important though

  • is that this manga is incredibly hot. It's fanservicey, for sure, it's just that the

  • manner of fanservice isn't D-cups and panty shotsno hate if that's what you likebut

  • fit women, stretching and stuff, and oh baby is that something which should exist.

  • Hana ni Arashi is even morethat one yuri manga you read back in 2005”, but I still

  • love it. Its girls are keeping their relationship hidden, as the series is sure to tell you

  • at the start of every chapter, but the thin, almost ethereal art is enough to draw the

  • reader into the precarious romance immediately, and its endearing seeing them find little

  • spaces for intimacy in and amongst their attempts at hiding their romance. Progress is slow,

  • and drama can be brutally hard to sit through as a result, but hey, I somehow haven't

  • had anything quite like this on the list so far, and for what it is, this is very good.

  • Oddman 11 is another one I recommended before and oh my god has it ever changed in the year

  • and a halfoh how time fliessince. As always, take the necessary caveat that the

  • main character theoretically wants to date a boy into account, because even though the

  • current path is clearly towards her beginning a polyamorous relationship with all the girls

  • who are into her, it's theoretically possible that my man Dowman Sayman could flip the script

  • on me and go the bad route. Still, it's probably about as absurd as Shimeji Simulation,

  • and honestly funnier, so you don't have an excuse to not be reading this. IT REFERENCES

  • THE DRAKENGARD ENDING FOR PETE'S SAKE. Luminous=Blue is an outstanding new series

  • about a young photographer who transfers to the school of her idol, only to learn said

  • idol is in a slump. Getting involved with a pair of ex-girlfriends, she finds herself

  • caught in a web of deceit and manipulation. Which doesn't sound like a cute romance

  • because it really isn't. There's plenty of cute moments, but the ultra-detailed art

  • contributes to both a very beautiful series and a deeply disturbing one, with plenty of

  • room to fill in all the blanks with the lies told by the characters. Mean things happen

  • here, and it could be the darkest work on this list if it weren't for one more coming

  • in a bit, but through that comes some very strong material on being honest with your

  • feelings, the way photos reveal our hidden emotions, and the framing of sexuality. The