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  • 00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:04,740 Welcome to Excel Basics Number 1.

  • This is the first video in a series

  • of Excel Basic Videos 1 to 25.

  • Now, in this first video, we're going

  • to talk about the Excel Grid, Formatting, Formulas, Cell

  • References, and Page Setup.

  • Now, this is a continuation of my Office 2016 video series.

  • This is video number 13 in that series.

  • Now, here's our list of topics.

  • And there are a lot of amazing topics.

  • Even just this one first video will give you

  • a lot of basic skills to accomplish tasks in Excel.

  • Now, this is our goal.

  • We're actually going to create a grade sheet--

  • names, assignments, numbers, and then formulas for average,

  • total, and even percentage grade.

  • All right.

  • I'm going to close this.

  • And here's our system of folders.

  • And of course, now that we're on to Excel,

  • we're going to be saving all of our files to 04 Excel.

  • Now let's open up a blank Excel workbook.

  • I'm going to click on the green x.

  • Now, just as in Word and PowerPoint,

  • the blank workbook is highlighted.

  • I can either click with my mouse,

  • hit Enter, or use the Escape key.

  • And here's our blank workbook.

  • The very first thing we do is we look up to the title bar.

  • Book 1 is not a good name, so we use our keyboard for save as--

  • F12.

  • Now, we're going to navigate to our folder.

  • And there it is--

  • 04 Excel.

  • We're going to click down in the file name and we're going

  • to call this EB for Excel Basics 01 dash--

  • and this is going to be a Gradebook.

  • There's our name.

  • The file extension by default in Excel is dot xlsx,

  • and that's fine for us.

  • I'm either going to click Save or hit Enter

  • to enact that Save button.

  • Now, I want to zoom in, but, of course, just

  • like int Word and PowerPoint, instead of using our Zoom

  • bar down on the status bar, I want to hold Control and roll

  • my wheel.

  • Now, the first thing we need to talk about

  • is the structure of Excel.

  • Notice up at the top, I hover my cursor--

  • DEF.

  • If I click on the E, that's a column.

  • Columns are represented by letters.

  • If I go over to the rows--

  • 2, 3, 4 5, and click on 6, numbers represent the rows.

  • Now, the reason that's so important

  • is because the intersection of a column and a row

  • is called a cell.

  • Now, the name of that cell is E6.

  • We can actually see the name of this cell by looking up.

  • This is called the formula bar.

  • And all the way on the left in the formula bar,

  • if you hover your cursor, is the name box.

  • We can see that that cell is named E6.

  • So the column is the letter.

  • The row is the number.

  • And I can click in any cell--

  • click there, and I know it's G6.

  • Now, the reason that knowing letters are columns,

  • numbers are rows, is because later, we'll

  • have to refer to our cell in formulas.

  • And knowing that E is the column and 6

  • is the row will be very helpful.

  • So if that's a cell and these are all cells,

  • then all the cells together make up what's called a Worksheet.

  • Now, we call them sheet for short.

  • Now, notice the little plus right there.

  • Sometimes we need new sheets.

  • We might need one for January, February, March.

  • You can simply click the plus, and there's

  • a new sheet inserted.

  • Now I can click back between the sheets.

  • I'm going to click on sheet 1.

  • Now, these are called Sheet Tabs.

  • Click back on Sheet 1.

  • Sheet 1 is not a good name for our sheet tab.

  • So to rename our sheet in the sheet tab,

  • we simply double click.

  • Now we can name this--

  • I'm going to name it GradebookFall17.

  • Now, if I come up to the ribbons and try to use something,

  • everything is grayed out.

  • That's because-- just like over in Windows Explorer--

  • we have to hit Enter to register that name.

  • So I hit Enter.

  • Now column, row, cell, sheet.

  • That's called a Worksheet tab.

  • All of the Worksheets together make up

  • what's called a Workbook.

  • And a Workbook has a name.

  • The name of our Workbook is EB01 Gradebook.

  • So this is called a Workbook file.

  • Now, the next thing we want to talk about

  • before we start entering data and numbers and formulas

  • is just something very basic.

  • Hey, this cursor right here--

  • that white thick cursor with a black shadow--

  • it's called the selection cursor, and here is why.

  • If I click in the middle of a cell and hold the click

  • and drag--

  • oh, look at that.

  • I can select or highlight cells.

  • So this is the selection cursor.

  • Now I'm going to select cell A1.

  • There's two other cursors we want

  • to learn about in this video.

  • If I hover right at the edge, that's called a move cursor.

  • Now, most of the time, the move cursor will get us in trouble.

  • But we need to know the difference

  • between selection, move, and--

  • right in the lower right-hand corner, that little green box--

  • that's called a Fill Handle.

  • If you move your selection cursor or move cursor

  • right over the Fill Handle, you'll see a crosshair.

  • Now, I like to call it--

  • instead of a crosshair, I like to call it an Angry Rabbit.

  • Now, we'll learn a lot of amazing tricks that we can do--

  • not with our selection, not with our move,

  • but with our Angry Rabbit cursor.

  • Those three cursors, we'll see in this video.

  • Hey, let's use our selection cursor.

  • Oh, we already have cell A1 selected.

  • I'm going to type something.

  • I'm going to type Data.

  • Now, to put something in the cell--

  • whether it's text, number, a formula--

  • you have a number of different options.

  • If you want to put the thing in the cell

  • and move the cursor down, you use the Enter key.

  • If, on the other hand--

  • I'm going to select the cell.

  • And remember, just like Word, if we have a word selected

  • and I want to replace it, I do not need to hit the Delete key.

  • I simply start typing.

  • I'm going to type Name.

  • Now we have something in the cell,

  • and we do not want to hit Enter to put it in and move

  • our cursor down.

  • Because we want to enter data across the columns,

  • I want to put the thing in the cell

  • and move my cursor to the right by hitting the Tab key.

  • Now, we're going to fill this out later with student names,

  • but we need quiz 1, quiz 2, quiz 3, and then test 1,

  • test 2, test 3.

  • So in cell B1, I'm going to type quiz space 1.

  • Now, instead of using Enter to put the thing in the cell

  • and go down or tab to go to the right,

  • I actually want to put the thing in the cell

  • and keep the cell selected.

  • So to do that, we use Control Enter.

  • Now, if you remember back to Word,

  • we used Control Enter a lot for page break.

  • But we're going to use Control Enter even more over here

  • in Excel because a lot of times we

  • want to put something in the cell and keep the cell

  • selected.

  • Now the reason we want the cell selected is we

  • might want to add formatting.

  • Or in our case, we want to copy it.

  • Now, remember, that little thing on the lower right hand corner

  • is called a Fill Handle.

  • And if you move your cursor over the Fill Handle,

  • that's the Angry Rabbit.

  • Now click-- that's a left click--

  • and drag.

  • Notice it's giving me a green box covering C1, D1.

  • Now let go.

  • Look at that.

  • Excel has so many magic tricks for our Angry Rabbit.

  • Anytime you have text and a number,

  • if you use your Angry Rabbit to copy it,

  • it will increment the numbers.

  • Now let's do the same thing over here.

  • I'm going to click in cell E1 with my selection cursor.

  • Test space 1.

  • My goal is to put the thing in the cell

  • and keep the cell selected, so I use Control Enter.

  • Now, hover my cursor over the Fill Handle--

  • not the move cursor, not the selection cursor.

  • It's the Angry Rabbit.

  • Click and drag all the way to G1.

  • Let go and look at that.

  • Now, I've got to come down below here

  • and show you a couple of other amazing tricks for that Angry

  • Rabbit.

  • I'm going to click in cell A12 and type J-A-N--

  • that's short for January--

  • Control Enter to put the thing in the cell

  • and keep the cell selected, point to the fill handle.

  • And when you see your Angry Rabbit, click and drag.

  • Now, that is amazing.

  • I'm building my calendars over here in Excel,

  • definitely not in a Word table.

  • It gets better than that.

  • If you put any date into a cell--

  • 10 slash 10 slash 2017--

  • that's a date.

  • I'm going to use Control Enter to put the thing in the cell

  • and keep the cell selected.

  • Now I'm in the hover my cursor.

  • And when I see my Angry Rabbit, I'm

  • going to click and drag down.

  • And look at that.

  • That is a quick way to get a bunch of dates--

  • for example, if you're building a schedule.

  • That is amazing.

  • The Angry Rabbit does many more tricks.

  • That's just a few of them.

  • Now let's continue with our Gradebook up here.

  • I'm going to use my selection cursor and select H1.

  • I'm going to type Total tab--

  • to put the thing in the cell and move to the right--

  • percentage grade, and now I'm going to hit Enter.

  • Now, we're going to have names here of students.

  • But I want a row at the top to tell me

  • the maximum score for each quiz and for each test.

  • And then I want to add them all up

  • so I know the maximum points possible in the class.

  • So right below Name, I'm going to type Max Tab.

  • Now, quizzes are worth 20 points each.

  • So 20 Control Enter-- because I want

  • to put the thing in the cell and keep the cell selected.

  • And let's see what happens if I try to copy this using my Angry

  • Rabbit--

  • 1, 1, and let go.

  • Oh.

  • It's going to give me just the number 20, which happens to be

  • exactly what we want.

  • Up here, that trick worked because there

  • was text and a number.

  • Down here it worked because internally, Excel

  • is programmed to create lists of months and increment dates

  • by day.

  • But if you use your Angry Rabbit on just a plain number

  • or a plain text item with no number, then it just copies.

  • That's exactly what we wanted there.

  • Man, that Angry Rabbit does a lot of amazing tricks.

  • I'm going to type 100, Control Enter,

  • and I'm going to use my Angry Rabbit to click and drag.

  • So each one of the tests will be worth 100 points.

  • Now, down here, we'll enter in the student

  • scores for each assignment.

  • But before we do that, in the name column,

  • I need to write each student's name.

  • The first student--

  • Sioux, Enter because I want to put the thing in the cell

  • and move my cursor down.

  • I'm entering data vertically into a column.