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  • (upbeat music)

  • - Hey Stark, how are you this morning?

  • - Hey Parker, I'm doing just fine, how are you?

  • - Fantastic, say, I wanted to ask you something,

  • so I recently decided I wanted to tutor,

  • you know, I really thought I could help others

  • with their classes and and be an educational super hero,

  • so to speak.

  • Anyway, I was wondering if you could possibly help me out?

  • - Sure, you know, I've only known you for a short while,

  • but you do seem like you have a lot of potential.

  • Why don't you go ahead and follow me up to my office

  • in Stark Tower, and I can maybe give you a few tips.

  • - Really, yeah, that would be great,

  • I've always wanted to see the top floor of Stark Tower.

  • This is so exciting.

  • - Yes it is, very exciting.

  • All right Peter Parker, before we make our way

  • up to the top of Stark Tower,

  • let's discuss a bit about what it means to be a tutor.

  • I know this may seem obvious to you,

  • but there's actually a lot that goes into being a tutor.

  • - Absolutely, I completely understand,

  • so just out of curiosity, what would you say

  • that a tutor is?

  • - Well, here's how I would put it,

  • a tutor is someone who engages in a pure teaching

  • and learning relationship with their students,

  • within a structured and supervised educational context.

  • In other words, a tutor is someone who works with students

  • to help them succeed academically,

  • by providing them with plenty of resources and skills,

  • that would help them do well in their classes.

  • - That makes sense,

  • but how is that any different from what a teacher does,

  • is there really any difference between being a tutor,

  • and being a professor?

  • - Actually, I'm really glad you asked that.

  • There definitely are similarities.

  • However, the key difference is that tutoring

  • is sort of a peer to peer learning relationship,

  • with one or more people.

  • A professor teaches a class full of students,

  • whereas a tutor helps individual students,

  • who may be seeking assistance in their class.

  • Another difference is that tutors work

  • on a more personal level to try and get students

  • not only to learn the material,

  • but also to help them acquire the skills and tools

  • to effectively learn the material on their own.

  • Also, professors are experts in their field

  • and tutors are not.

  • Tutors are supposed to be very knowledgeable

  • in their subject area they are tutoring for.

  • However, they are not expected to be experts.

  • - Okay, wow, light bulb that makes a lot more sense.

  • - Great, let's go inside.

  • All right, so something you may want to consider

  • is the manner in which you may address a student,

  • from a tutoring perspective.

  • Let's try to consider a situation that you could

  • potentially find yourself in.

  • - All right, I'm listening.

  • - Let's say that Charles Xavier is a tutor and has been

  • tutoring his student Raven Darkholme for about an hour a

  • day for the last five weeks in Intro to Psychology.

  • Now, one day at the beginning of their meeting, Raven

  • arrives late and looks very shaken.

  • Her eyes dart about nervously and she appears

  • to be very jittery.

  • Charles of course has never seen her this startled before

  • and begins expressing concern.

  • A few minutes into the session, Raven starts complaining

  • about how her shrink has changed her medication and says

  • she stopped taking it and that she's having trouble

  • feelings good at the moment.

  • Raven continues to describe the situation in more depth,

  • but her narrative is very fragmented and the more she

  • talks, the more she becomes agitated.

  • Charles realizes that their tutoring time is ticking away

  • and that the medication she was referring to may be related

  • to psychological treatment.

  • What would you do in this situation if you were

  • Charles Xavier?

  • Do you think it would be an appropriate time to continue

  • the tutoring session?

  • - You know, I would safely assume that Raven may not be

  • mentally stable in that moment and that it probably isn't

  • the best time for her to be having the session.

  • I personally would try to reschedule another time, maybe

  • direct her to services on campus

  • that might be able to help her.

  • I think this would be much more beneficial than trying to

  • proceed with the session.

  • - Perfect that's actually a really great answer.

  • I couldn't have said it better myself.

  • Just keep in mind that situations like this may actually

  • exist and as a tutor, you'll want to behave responsibly.

  • Let's go ahead and hop on the elevator.

  • There are six main goals that I want my tutors to focus on

  • that I believe will help you develop the best practices for

  • being a tutor.

  • The first goal is to promote independent learning

  • with your student.

  • This is very important because we want students to acquire

  • the skillset to learn independently without your help.

  • You don't want to just explain everything to the student

  • and give them all the answers because in doing so, they are

  • never actually learning how to learn, which means they will

  • always be reliant on you to do their work for them.

  • We really want students to develop independent learning

  • strategies, so that they can continue to be successful in

  • all of their courses, not just the one

  • that you're tutoring in.

  • - That's a really good point.

  • I actually always thought that tutoring was just a process

  • of teaching material to the students.

  • - Exactly and that's why I really want to stress that this

  • is not what tutors should be doing.

  • - Okay, I'll definitely remember that.

  • - The second goal is to personalize the tutoring session

  • when you are working with a student.

  • You should understand that every student learns in

  • different ways.

  • We are all wired differently based on our genetics and most

  • importantly based on our experiences,

  • especially earlier in life.

  • By the time a student reaches you and seeks for your help,

  • they will be wired a very specific way based on their

  • experiences from birth to present, so some students may be

  • more visual learners, others may be more auditory learners

  • or hands-on learners.

  • Some students may study better in quiet environments and

  • others may study with background music.

  • The point I'm trying to make is keep in mind that every

  • student is unique and your session should be planned and

  • personalized based on what works best for them.

  • - I guess I never really thought of things that way.

  • People are very unique in so many ways.

  • I'll have to keep that in mind.

  • - Perfect, so the third goal is to implement multiple

  • perspectives and insights when your student is trying to

  • learn the material.

  • Your objective as a tutor should be to look at the content

  • from multiple angles, try to see how the student

  • conceptualizes the information.

  • Observe their methods of learning and then share new

  • perspectives with them on how to approach learning the

  • material.

  • As a tutor, you're good at approaching and studying new

  • material.

  • Share this wisdom with your students, but most importantly

  • facilitate the students insight into the learning process

  • and remember the goal of the tutor is to provide

  • opportunities and support students as they search for

  • answers.

  • - Definitely that makes a lot of sense.

  • Oh, we're stopping, I don't believe this is the right floor.

  • Someone must be getting on the elevator.

  • - Well, hello Natasha.

  • Parker, I'd like to introduce you to Natasha Romanov.

  • Natasha, this is Peter Parker.

  • Natasha is a close colleague of mine.

  • - Nice to meet you Peter.

  • - Likewise.

  • - We were just talking about the six goals of tutoring.

  • We actually just discussed the first three just now.

  • - Oh yes, do you mind if I explain the other three?

  • - Not at all, go right ahead.

  • - All right, well, the fourth goal is to provide your

  • perspective on learning and school success through the lens

  • of being a student yourself.

  • A part of being a tutor is establishing a peer to peer

  • relationship.

  • Remember that you have experience in the class.

  • You've likely just recently taken the course and you have a

  • lot of knowledge on how the class is structured.

  • Relay this to your students.

  • You know how the professor teaches the course.

  • You know what they may be looking for on an exam.

  • You know what is expected on class assignments.

  • Keep that in mind.

  • - Also keep in mind that if you haven't taken the course

  • recently, you can always ask the professor if anything has

  • changed or you can also talk to other tutors and mentors to

  • gain more knowledge for your own sessions.

  • - Very good point.

  • The fifth goal is to respect individual differences.

  • There are a lot of different people at IUPUI with a lot of

  • diverse backgrounds, ideas, opinions and motivations.

  • It is important that you have respect for everyone, no

  • matter who they are and be mindful that many students will

  • likely be very different than you.

  • It should go both ways.

  • The student should also respect who you are as an

  • individual as well.

  • If for whatever reason, a confrontation were to arise and

  • the student disrespects you, be sure to inform your

  • supervisor or program coordinator and they will assist you.

  • - Absolutely, respecting people for who they are is very

  • important to me.

  • I'll definitely make an effort to treat my students with

  • respect based on their individual differences.

  • - That's great, I like to hear that.

  • The sixth goal is to make sure that you are staying within

  • your realm of tutoring.

  • Stick to the job description.

  • Remember that you're not a counselor, you're not a

  • psychiatrist and you're not the professor.

  • You are a tutor, know your limits.

  • For example, if a student is having trouble with personal

  • problems, it's not your job to help them with that.

  • Refer the student to other resources offered on campus when

  • they need help with something else outside of your job

  • description.

  • - Okay, so does that mean I should be familiar with all the

  • resources on campus?

  • - You don't have to have all resources memorized, but you

  • should make an effort to know them or help the student

  • find those resources by doing a simple web search if you

  • don't know.

  • - Okay that's actually very helpful.

  • I wouldn't have thought to do that.

  • - Great, so definitely try to keep these goals in mind.

  • They will help you stay on track as a tutor.

  • Well, it looks like this is our stop, let's go ahead and

  • get off now.

  • (upbeat music)

  • - Welcome to the top of Stark Tower.

  • You can actually look outside and see IUPUI from here.

  • - This is way too cool.

  • IUPUI looks amazing from this view.

  • - These are two more colleagues of mine Wanda Maximoff and

  • Bruce Banner.

  • They along with Natasha are going to help you train to

  • become a tutor.

  • - Nice to meet you both.

  • - It's good to meet you Peter.

  • - We already discussed the six goals of tutoring on the

  • long elevator ride up here and we also already discuss what

  • it means to be a tutor.

  • Now, we need to talk about something that we refer to as

  • the tutoring cycle.

  • Wanda, would you care to begin?

  • - The tutor cycle is designed to help you organize your

  • tutoring session and keep you on track.

  • It's a 12-step process that should really help you plan for

  • your session and keep things running smoothly.

  • 12 steps is a lot to remember, so you don't necessarily

  • have to memorize each step, but you should be familiar with

  • them and be able to implement them in order during your

  • session.

  • I think you will actually find it to be quite helpful.

  • The first step is to greet your student, make them feel

  • comfortable coming