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  • So, this dish is definitely a party rice.

  • It just makes you wanna get up and dance.

  • Hi, my name's Tei, and today I'm gonna be making

  • my family's recipe for Ghanaian jollof rice.

  • Jollof rice is a West African dish

  • where the rice is cooked in a tomato-based stew.

  • Growing up as a Ghanaian in London,

  • no matter what party I went to,

  • there was always jollof rice whether it was a wedding,

  • a christening, or even someone's 16th birthday party.

  • A Ghanaian party without jollof rice

  • is like a wedding without the cake.

  • Although they look small,

  • these peppers pack a serious punch.

  • So, if heat's not for you, be careful how much you use.

  • I remember one day when visiting Ghana,

  • I went to an aunt's house and she cooked jollof rice.

  • I don't know how much pepper she put in it,

  • but my whole face went red, I was sweating.

  • Usually, the jollof rice will be cooked by aunts,

  • even grandparents, where they'll cook it in big pots

  • that usually need to be carried

  • by about two people into the venue.

  • There'll be music playing in the background,

  • the kids will be running around, laughing, giggling.

  • Every family gathering will get lively.

  • People will be drinking, eating, and dancing

  • and just laughing the whole night through.

  • Some countries just put anything in the blender

  • and cook it at once.

  • My mom cooks it in part,

  • and a big difference is that she also adds vegetables.

  • If I know you and you haven't eaten jollof rice

  • with my family, we're probably not friends.

  • Growing up in the UK, food played a vital role

  • in bringing the family together

  • and just reminding us about our culture.

  • No matter where you're from in West Africa,

  • jollof rice is just something

  • that you can always expect at a party,

  • and when you're clearing up,

  • you can always expect to find grains on the dance floor.

  • Mom would be proud.

  • Hi, my name is Kiano,

  • and today I'll be making Kenyan Pilau.

  • Pilau is one of those dishes that really shows

  • the diversity in Kenya within our food.

  • For Maasai people, we don't use a lot of spices

  • as maybe people on the coastal part of Kenya,

  • but I love playing around with spices,

  • so I add just a little bit

  • to make it a little bit more exciting.

  • So, when developing my own recipe for pilau,

  • I really just channeled in all the best pilau I've ever had.

  • Now, the best pilaus I've ever had

  • always always always have meat and potato.

  • I don't know what it is about that double starch thing,

  • but when I have pilau without potato, it just feels wrong.

  • I think the thing I love about Kenyan parties

  • is that it's always about food.

  • Our parties aren't one of those where you turn up

  • and then food is ready then you eat.

  • That'd be a very short party if you just turned up to eat

  • because then what would you do?

  • All of the parties that I've been to,

  • the cooking is happening during the party.

  • It's almost like the cooking is the party itself.

  • People are out back, they're grilling, they're barbecuing,

  • they're hanging out around what's being cooked to socialize,

  • and honestly, I think the best parties revolve around food.

  • Mm.

  • Alright, now it's time to party.

  • - Hi, my name's Amal, and today I'll be making

  • my family's recipe for Somali Bariis.

  • Bariis is a dish which literally translates into rice.

  • It has a lot of ways that it's made.

  • Typically, it consists of rice, a bunch of spices,

  • and some type of meat on top.

  • Bariis is made by a lot of people in my family.

  • Every time I have it, it's a little different

  • depending on who makes it.

  • It's one of those dishes that is hard to get wrong,

  • so if you do get it wrong, you probably aren't a good cook.

  • No shade.

  • The spice blend that's typically used

  • for Somali Bariis dishes is called Xawaash,

  • which literally translates into spices.

  • Bariis can be served at a variety of parties.

  • I think one of the most important parties

  • that it's served at is weddings.

  • So, you're at a Somali wedding,

  • typically a lot later than you bargained for,

  • the bride or groom is not there, it's like 11:00 p.m.

  • but some nice, amazing person

  • has decided to get the food out early.

  • You're ecstatic, and what's the first thing they bring out?

  • The bariis.

  • I don't think I've ever been to a Somali wedding

  • without Bariis, maybe the bougie ones.

  • The raisins are my favorite part.

  • It's always a topping that really completes the dish.

  • The food coloring on the fries isn't a mandatory step,

  • but it just makes the fries look more fun,

  • and everyone wants to have fun when they eat bariis.

  • I did not make the connection that these

  • were also French fries for a really long time.

  • I was like these are just fun potatoes

  • we eat on top of our bariis.

  • Community is a huge part of the Somali culture,

  • and this dish is reminiscent of that.

  • My mom and my aunt helped me learn this dish.

  • That's another reason why the bond of family

  • is so important, especially through food.

  • The end all be all in the Somali dish is the banana.

  • You can't have bariis without banana,

  • and I don't care who tells you otherwise,

  • it's what makes it the most special.

  • Tastes like home.

  • - Hi, I'm Kiki Canuto, and today I'm showing you

  • how to make my family's Cape Verdean Arroz de Marisco.

  • Traditionally, we use calamari or octopus.

  • We put in a lot of shrimp and mussels as well

  • to have right on top.

  • Those are kind of the three staple ingredients

  • that we have in this type of rice.

  • So, you can find this dish

  • at just about any Cape Verdean party.

  • We love having some sort of rice dish present.

  • We actually have multiple dishes of rice there.

  • Cape Verde is definitely a party country,

  • and I think a lot of West African cultures

  • celebrate food really really big and really really loud.

  • Cape Verde is no exception to that.

  • It's a country that thrives off of its music, its food,

  • and its hospitality, which I think is very similar

  • to a lot of West African countries.

  • At any Cape Verdean party,

  • you can find a whole bunch of your cousins,

  • cousins you haven't even known about.

  • So, you'll meet your cousins for the first time there,

  • you'll meet your aunts, uncles, grandparents.

  • Usually, you'll just be walking around to tables

  • and greeting everyone, saying hi,

  • giving them kisses on the cheeks.

  • So, your rice is going to be a little bit

  • more sticky than you'd think.

  • At the end of the dish, we add a little bit of the broth

  • that we make with the seafood mixture.

  • Once everyone's eaten,

  • which is obviously the most important part of the party,

  • everyone will be on the dance floor.

  • So, you'll be dancing with your grandma,

  • your grandpa, anyone.

  • It's really really loud,

  • the energy is super upbeat and vibrant,

  • and it just makes you wanna get up and dance.

So, this dish is definitely a party rice.

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B1 US rice party dish somali cape family

Party Rice Around Africa

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    Rachel Kung posted on 2018/07/12
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