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  • Hey, guys!

  • Hi!

  • So, in Japan there are names called "Kirakira" names.

  • Sparkly names.

  • Yeah, kirakira means sparkly, or shiny, and those names

  • are very, very unique and- -"Unique"

  • Yeah, no one actually uses these names to name their own child

  • and often time it's very hard to read or many of them are impossible to read.

  • What do you mean, no one actually uses them? Some people do use them, right?

  • I mean, some, a few, maybe one or two people.

  • Jun is too polite so say it, but these are bad Japanese baby names.

  • Yeah, I admit it, they're really bad so...

  • Have you ever, you know those lists we have in America of the worst baby names

  • and you're like, "How, how did someone name their child this?"

  • Well, that is not unique to Western culture.

  • They do that here in Japan as well.

  • So today, we're going to give you some examples of those really bad Japanese names a.k.a. Kirakira names.

  • So the thing about Japanese names is that they have a kanji and then, of course, a reading.

  • Many kanji have several readings but the thing about kirakira names is

  • the readings that they're given aren't

  • necessarily real readings of that kanji, so Japanese

  • people have no idea how to pronounce these names,

  • and in fact it's impossible for Japanese people to guess how these names are pronounced base on the kanji.

  • So, for example:

  • So, the top kanji means "Light" and the second kanji means "Universe" or "Space"

  • and this person's name is:

  • "Pikachu"

  • R: Wait, wait, really? -Yeah, it's Pikachu.

  • R: That's how you pronounce it? -Yeah.

  • Nooo, that poor kid! -I know right?

  • I'm so sorry, Pikachu. No! Oh my god, can you imagine that kid in school?

  • "Pikachu-kun!"

  • That's so bad.

  • I mean, like, imagine when you are like 20, or 30, or 40, and then you're boss' name is Pikachu.

  • This one is not really, like, kirakira name. Um, the reading is literally "Tai Ma".

  • That's how we read this kanji

  • but this kanji with this word literally means "Marijuana".

  • R: Wait, really? -Yeah.

  • It's a name for a boy.

  • R: Oh, no! -I don't know what the parents were thinking!

  • "Hey little Marijuana! Come eat your vegetables!"

  • You seem pretty high today!

  • Up next on the baby name list!

  • When I saw these two names, I literally had no idea how to read them.

  • So apparently, this one is "Jibanyan" from the popular anime for kids, and this one,

  • R: Yo-Kai Watch -Yeah, Yo-Kai Watch, right. And this one is

  • "Mewtwo", from Pokemon again.

  • Nooo! Why are parents doing this to their kids?!

  • How can you do that?!

  • I mean, I couldn't believe that these names actually exist.

  • Wait, this is pronounced "Mewtwo"?

  • Apparently so, yeah.

  • You can't even write "two".

  • I don't-No. -Like, with katakana maybe, but..

  • I think cause this means "number 2" -Ah, number 2.

  • In English. -Yeah.

  • So maybe that's how they make it read. I don't know.

  • They said these exist so I think they actually do exist. -This is no longer funny to me.

  • All right, Jun, what's next?

  • "Hamtaro" -Ok, I'm done. I'm done. I'm done.

  • So, it's a name from the... was it anime, I guess?

  • The animation. The hamster animation for kids. Hamtaro.

  • But when I was in school I had a friend whose name was "Kotaro". Kotaro-kun.

  • It's a boy. And this part looks really similar to katakana "Ham",

  • so I just started calling him Hamtaro and he kind of went "Funny, funny".

  • So, his nickname was Hamtaro.

  • Yeah but, ok, that's a cute nickname for a friend,

  • like from one friend to another friend,

  • but then you don't name your child Hamtaro!

  • Yeah, that's insane.

  • And next!

  • This kanji, this word, literally means "Main Character".

  • Um, "Shujinko", but his name is "Hero".

  • What? -Yeah, Hero.

  • R: Nooo. Can you read this kanji like that? Hero. -Impossible

  • There is a word for hero, which is "Eiyuu", but they don't even use that kanji to make it read like hero.

  • They just named their son Main Character like the hero.

  • But you can't read it like that even. -Isn't he going to grow up to be super Chuunibyou or something?

  • I mean, I think the kid's going to be really realistic and hate their parents so bad and become probably really smart and, like...

  • Can you change your name in Japan?

  • Um, so, in the Meiji period, like a long time ago, they made two rules which are:

  • You can have only one name, and you cannot change your name.

  • But later they edited the rule, and if you bring it to a Family Court then you can change your name.

  • Ok. -Somehow

  • But, if you are under 15 years old then you have to bring it

  • to a Family Court with a legal representative, which normally are your parents

  • and if your parents are lacking in common sense like these [with names], they probably wouldn't let you

  • change your name, so you have to wait until you are turning 15 years old.

  • So Pikachu-san doesn't have to be Pikachu-san forever. -Yeah

  • By the way, what's your favourite name that maybe you want to use for your kid if you have one in the future?

  • I really like old Japanese masculine names. -Uh-huh

  • I don't know why but they sound like really, really cool.

  • Uh-huh. -My favourite Japanese boy name is "Isamu"

  • Ahh, right-right-right, it was Isamu, wasn't it?

  • Yeah, like the name was Isamu and the kanji means "courage", which is really cool.

  • Or "brave" -Or 'brave", yeah. Yeah, Isamu.

  • Yeah, and it's like, it's a normal Japanese name. It's not kirakira.

  • Yeah, not at all. It's very traditional.

  • Yeah, it's very old. Does it sound old to Japanese people? Like does it sound bad?

  • No. No, I don't think it sounds bad, at all. -Ok, really? Mm-hm.

  • Are there like old Japanese names that sound bad?

  • Because a lot of really old names in America are like that,

  • so if you have kid, for example, you probably aren't going to name your child, like, Barbara anymore.

  • I mean, like, we can also tell that if your name sounds kinda old

  • because that's what they used to use back then, -Uh-huh

  • but like, they don't necessarily have to have a bad meaning or connotation, so... -Uh-huh

  • So it doesn't sound bad. -It sounds old.

  • Yeah. -They sound old, but personally I don't think it's a problem. Yeah. -Yeah

  • Ok, so I'm also going to go over some Western names to make this fair

  • so you guys can see what kind of names we also have. -I am very excited and I'm very sad at the same time.

  • I was able to find a list.

  • Like an actual list of the new baby names in 2015 in England and Wales.

  • So this isn't America but this one I was actually able to find a list -England? Ok.

  • where they wrote down I think every single new name

  • as long as at least 3 babies were named in that year, so...

  • In 2015, in England and Wales, there are...

  • There are three boys named:

  • "C".

  • C? -The letter C.

  • Four boys named the letter "T"

  • Four boys named the letter "J"

  • And there were eleven boys named the letter "A"

  • This is, you can't name a child a single letter. Do you understand how hard it is going to be for them to fill up online forms?

  • That's going to be so confusing. For that child's future. -Ahh.

  • 2015 in England and Wales there were nine boys named "Nimrod",

  • a which is a biblical character,

  • and that's cool and all, if it weren't for the fact that

  • Nimrod became slang for "Idiot" in North America.

  • そう なの? (Is that so?) -Yeah.

  • But that's like common sense, people know that?

  • In North America, yeah. This is... It's kind of an older slang. -Uh-huh.

  • I don't think many people these days still use nimrod to make fun of someone

  • but if you hear the word "nimrod" you think "slang for idiot."

  • That's what they think.

  • That's what you call, yeah, and I feel like if you want to reclaim

  • the biblical name Nimrod, that's cool, but maybe rename

  • yourself Nimrod. Don't subject your child to like twelve years of schooling being named Nimrod.

  • That poor child!

  • At least this is in England, right? -Oh my gosh!

  • Yeah. -Not in America.

  • Yeah, I mean what if they move to America? -Well, I mean,

  • And I don't know, maybe some British people also know the slang of it being stupid.

  • Is this common slang in the UK? -In the UK?

  • Do you guys recognize this as slang for idiot, or is this just North America?

  • This is jumping now to just random lists of names I found,

  • so maybe these are in America, I'm not really sure,

  • but apparently, a new-ish name they're naming baby girls these days is:

  • Phelony!

  • Felony, which is the worst type of crime you can be charged with in America.

  • With the letter F? Felony? -Yes, with the letter F.

  • I mean, it sounds pretty as a word by itself,

  • but you have to understand the connotations of, like, the actual words

  • that are pronounced the same way.

  • Like there's not just this but another name that I've been seeing

  • for years and years and years in America on these lists is the name Chlamydia.

  • which sounds like a pretty girl name

  • but it's the name of a sexually transmitted disease. -Ughh!

  • So, so I feel really bad for any Chlamydias.

  • Apparently in America there are now over, or as of a couple years ago, there are over 300 children named:

  • "Abcde". The first 5 letter of the alphabet, pronounced "Ob-siddy",

  • which I mean, if you want to create a name that's cool,

  • but maybe don't, like, give your child a novelty name

  • and just write down the first five letters of the alphabet. That's weird!

  • That would be like naming your child in Japanese "a-i-u-e-o". -Yeah, that's horrible.

  • I feel like with names, names are supposed to be unique because

  • that's how you differentiate yourself from everyone else,

  • so I have no problem with people creating new names.