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  • - It may seem like anything goes during wartime

  • but the truth is there are many internationally

  • prohibited weapons that are so powerful,

  • that we should refrain ourselves from using them.

  • Here are the top 10 weapons deemed so deadly

  • that they're prohibited by international agreements.

  • Number 1O: blinding laser beams.

  • Sometime in the mid 1990s the US air force

  • had funded research on how they can destroy eye sight

  • at long distances using high powered lasers.

  • After all, disrupting the vision of your enemies

  • could help tip the scales of war.

  • During that time, the justification to its development

  • was that it's a more humain weapon than napalm,

  • radiation or bombs.

  • The research continued until the human rights watch

  • caught out the unnecessary danger it could bring.

  • Understanding its impact, the United Nations prohibited

  • the use of laser beams when it adopted the protocol

  • on blinding laser weapons.

  • While the treaty was created over two decades ago,

  • its lessons are still felt to this day.

  • It's become the precursor of preemptive banning of weapons,

  • that could prove to be very concerning

  • for safety and security.

  • For example, the discussion about lethal autonomous weapons

  • is already leaning towards prohibition,

  • even during its development.

  • Much like how it was with blinding lasers.

  • Number 9: biological weapons.

  • Biological weapons inflict some of

  • the most traumatizing means of devastation.

  • So much so,

  • that the 1972 Biological Weapons Convention was made.

  • This was the first multi-lateral disarmament treaty

  • banning the development,

  • production and stock piling of an entire category

  • of weapons of mass destruction.

  • It took full force on March 26, 1975.

  • Once such weapon, etched in history was Rinderpest,

  • a deadly cattle plague which Genghis Khan used

  • to invade Europe in the 13th century.

  • This resulted to a contagious disease

  • that caused dehydration

  • and eventual death of various animals,

  • upsetting natural ecosystems,

  • as well as human food supplies.

  • Perhaps the most troubling is what the call chimera viruses.

  • This refers to tweaking the genetic structure of viruses

  • such as anthrax and smallpox making them even more lethal.

  • Potentially triggering two diseases at once.

  • For example, the Soviet Union's chimera project

  • studied the feasibility of combining smallpox and Ebola

  • into one supervirus back in the late 1980s.

  • Just think of the horror such a weapon could bring,

  • and you'd understand why it makes sense

  • to ban these weapons.

  • Number 8: certain bombs.

  • We all know bombs are destructive forces

  • used in warfare,

  • but the following ones

  • are especially devastating,

  • to the point they have to be prohibited.

  • The cluster bomb for example,

  • indiscriminately damages civilians, combatants

  • and even infrastructure.

  • This type of bomb releases multiple projectiles on impact,

  • which makes it use extremely devastating.

  • It can also leave behind unexploded debris,

  • causing further danger.

  • As such, the Convention on Cluster Munitions,

  • held in May 2008, banned its use.

  • Bringing 108 signatories and 103 parties behind the treaty.

  • Another is a dirty bomb,

  • which is somewhat like a weak or nuclear bomb,

  • except it uses conventional explosives

  • to spread dangerous radioactive material over a wide area.

  • Rather than a normal fission reaction,

  • this can cause alteration to DNA,

  • resulting in cancer, mutations and radiation sickness.

  • Furthermore, it leaves a desolate wasteland in its wake,

  • so there's that problem.

  • Of course, nuclear weapons are the most popular

  • for obvious reasons.

  • The Tsar Bomba is probably the most fearsome,

  • described to cause similar damage

  • to simultaneously detonating 3,800 Hiroshima bombs.

  • It's dangers are well acknowledged

  • that the treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons

  • was created in July 2017,

  • which now has 57 states that participate in it.

  • Of course, that still means there are many nations out there

  • who still hold these weapons.

  • Number 7: expanding bullets.

  • Sustaining gunshot wounds can be deadly,

  • but you know what's worse?

  • Getting hit by an expanding bullet.

  • Expanding ordnances also given the moniker

  • of hollow point bullets or dum-dums are designed to mushroom

  • upon entering a target

  • in order to stop the projective from leaving the body.

  • Unlike regular bullets that just penetrate a targeted area,

  • expanding bullets cause maximum tissue damage

  • as they spread out upon impact.

  • This type of bullet was formerly used by US policemen

  • to mitigate collateral damage,

  • but was discontinued after understanding

  • how lethal it could be.

  • If that's not enough,

  • some are coated with poison

  • which could lead to secondary infections

  • if the expanding ordnance fail to go for the kill.

  • Some even contain anthrax spores or botulinum toxin

  • which is rather scary in conjunction with the gunshot wound

  • because of the imposing threat.

  • This kind of bullet was banned under

  • the Hague Convention of 1899.

  • Even conservation, hunting and veterinary groups

  • have filed a formal petition

  • with the Environmental Protection Agency

  • to ban the addition of poison to bullets,

  • as it can severely backfire on humans

  • when we consume hunted animals.

  • Number 6: punji sticks.

  • During the Vietnam war,

  • a small and poorly equipped guerrilla group,

  • noticed the Viet Cong was at a disadvantage

  • as they faced American forces

  • that had more advanced weaponry,

  • but they were able to turn things around

  • with a little bit of ingenuity using bamboos and hardwood,

  • which were later dubbed punji sticks.

  • Punji sticks are sharpened pieces of bamboo

  • that are hardened by fire

  • and boast lethal sharp points

  • to make them even more fearsome.

  • They're sometimes coated with poison,

  • making it a simple yet effective defensive strategy

  • at the time.

  • These sticks were enough to strike fear

  • into the hearts of unsuspecting foot soldiers

  • who dared to venture into the lush jungles,

  • especially since they were hidden almost everywhere

  • as booby traps.

  • This weapon's notorious reputation gave it a spot in

  • the 1980 Geneva Convention where this type of weaponry

  • was banned.

  • Punji sticks were deemed to be excessively deadly

  • and it was agreed that they have indiscriminate effects,

  • brought about by their poison coating.

  • To date, there are 50 signatories and 125 parties

  • that stand behind the treaty.

  • Number 5: incendiary weapons.

  • Incendiary weapons set fire to everything in their path.

  • Indiscriminately affecting both combatants

  • and innocent civilians.

  • Aside from this painful damage to people

  • that's difficult to treat,

  • they can also destroy infrastructure as well.

  • Their danger is acknowledged worldwide.

  • So much that over 110 nations participated

  • in the 1980 convention on incendiary weapons.

  • Unfortunately, despite this agreement being in place,

  • the use of such horrible weaponry is still evident today.

  • The Human Rights Watch

  • accused Russian and Syrian warplanes

  • of using incendiary bombs

  • and dropping them on civilian areas in Syria

  • back in June 2016.

  • Numerous pieces of video evidence exists

  • along with witness testimonies

  • and physical reminants of the bombs,

  • proving this banned weapon has indeed been used.

  • It's not just Russia and Syria.

  • The United States is also guilty,

  • as it admitted to using white phosphorous in Fallujah.

  • This material ignites when it's exposed to oxygen

  • and victims have described the sensation

  • as feeling like having their skin melted.