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  • I'd like you all

  • to ask yourselves a question

  • which you may never have asked yourselves before:

  • What is possible with the human voice?

  • What is possible with the human voice?

  • (Beatboxing)

  • Ooh baby

  • baby

  • baby

  • baby ♪ (Baby crying)

  • baby ♪ (Baby crying)

  • baby ♪ (Cat meowing)

  • (Dog barking)

  • Yeah.

  • (Applause)

  • (Boomerang noises)

  • It was coming straight for me. I had to. It was, yeah.

  • As you can probably well imagine,

  • I was a strange child.

  • (Laughter)

  • Because the thing is, I was constantly trying

  • to extend my repertoire of noises to be

  • the very maximum that it could be.

  • I was constantly experimenting with these noises.

  • And I'm still on that mission.

  • I'm still trying to find every noise

  • that I can possibly make.

  • And the thing is, I'm a bit older and wiser now,

  • and I know that there's some noises

  • I'll never be able to make because I'm hemmed in

  • by my physical body, and there's things it can't do.

  • And there's things that no one's voice can do.

  • For example, no one can do two notes at the same time.

  • You can do two-tone singing,

  • which monks can do, which is like...

  • (Two-tone singing)

  • But that's cheating.

  • And it hurts your throat.

  • So there's things you can't do, and these limitations

  • on the human voice have always really annoyed me,

  • because beatbox is the best way of getting

  • musical ideas out of your head and into the world,

  • but they're sketches at best,

  • which is what's annoyed me.

  • If only, if only there was a way

  • for these ideas to come out unimpeded

  • by the restrictions which my body gives it.

  • So I've been working with these guys,

  • and we've made a machine.

  • We've made a system which is basically

  • a live production machine,

  • a real-time music production machine,

  • and it enables me to, using nothing but my voice,

  • create music in real time as I hear it in my head

  • unimpeded by any physical restrictions

  • that my body might place on me.

  • And I'm going to show you what it can do.

  • And before I start making noises with it,

  • and using it to manipulate my voice,

  • I want to reiterate that everything that you're about to hear

  • is being made by my voice.

  • This system has --

  • thank you, beautiful assistant --

  • this system has no sounds in it itself

  • until I start putting sounds in it,

  • so there's no prerecorded samples of any kind.

  • So once this thing really gets going,

  • and it really starts to mangle the audio I'm putting into it,

  • it becomes not obvious that it is the human voice,

  • but it is, so I'm going to take you through it bit by bit

  • and start nice and simple.

  • So the polyphony problem: I've only got one voice.

  • How do I get around the problem

  • of really wanting to have as many different voices

  • going on at the same time.

  • The simplest way to do it is something like this.

  • (Beatboxing)

  • By dancing. It's like this.

  • (Music)

  • Thanks.

  • (Applause)

  • So that's probably the easiest way.

  • But if you want to do something a little bit more immediate,

  • something that you can't achieve with live looping,

  • there's other ways to layer your voice up.

  • There's things like pitch-shifting,

  • which are awesome,

  • and I'm going to show you now what that sounds like.

  • So I'm going to start another beat for you, like this.

  • (Beatboxing)

  • There's always got to be a bit of a dance at the start,

  • because it's just fun, so

  • you can clap along if you want.

  • You don't have to. It's fine. Check it out.

  • I'm going to lay down a bass sound now.

  • (Music)

  • And now, a rockabilly guitar.

  • Which is nice. But what if I want to make, say, a -- (Applause) --

  • Thanks. What if I want to make, say, a rock organ?

  • Is that possible? Yes, it is,

  • by recording myself like this.

  • (Organ sound)

  • And now I have that, I have that recorded.

  • Assign it to a keyboard.

  • (Music)

  • So that's cool.

  • (Applause)

  • But what if I wanted to sound like the whole of Pink Floyd?

  • Impossible, you say. No.

  • It is possible, and you can do it very simply

  • using this machine. It's really fantastic. Check it out.

  • (Music)

  • So every noise you can hear there is my voice.

  • I didn't just trigger something which sounds like that.

  • There's no samples. There's no synthesizers.

  • That is literally all my voice being manipulated,

  • and when you get to that point, you have to ask, don't you,

  • what's the point?

  • Why do this? (Laughter)

  • Because it's cheaper than hiring the whole of Pink Floyd,

  • I suppose, is the easy answer.

  • But in actual fact, I haven't made this machine

  • so that I can emulate things that already exist.

  • I've made this so that I can make

  • any noise that I can imagine.

  • So with your permission, I'm going to do

  • some things that are in my mind,

  • and I hope you enjoy them,

  • because they're rather unusual,

  • especially when you're doing things which are

  • as unusual as this, it can be hard to believe

  • that it is all my voice, you see.

  • (Voice effects)

  • (Music)

  • Like this.

  • (Music)

  • So, loosely defined,

  • that is what's possible with the human voice.

  • Thank you very much, ladies and gentlemen.

  • (Applause)

I'd like you all

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A2 US TED voice baby baby baby beatboxing music

【TED】Beardyman: The polyphonic me (The polyphonic me | Beardyman)

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    Zenn posted on 2017/09/23
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