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  • This is a story involving Facebook

  • and a company called Cambridge Analytica.

  • Which I know sounds like a Harry Potter spell

  • that does your homework, but...

  • it's actually a data analytics company

  • dedicated to one thing:

  • figuring out how to manipulate you at all costs.

  • NEWSMAN: Beginning in 2014, many Facebook users were paid

  • to take a personality test funded by Cambridge Analytica,

  • agreeing to give up some personal data.

  • But what they didn't know--

  • at the same time, the company was scooping up

  • all of their friends' private information, too.

  • So a survey that started with about 270,000 people

  • ultimately collected more than 50 million profiles.

  • All right, I'm sorry, but that's some bullshit, right?

  • Because your friend took this dumbass quiz,

  • this company you've never heard of got access to your account?

  • Yeah. It's like your friend boned someone,

  • and then you get the STD.

  • It's like, "What the (bleep) man."

  • "It was totally worth it." "Not for me."

  • (applause)

  • Now...

  • Now, you might be saying,

  • "What do I care if Cambridge Analytica got my Facebook data?

  • "I don't mind that people know

  • "that I like Ben Affleck's back tattoo.

  • I think it brings out his eyes."

  • But the truth is, the truth is, in the wrong hands,

  • our data can be used to do some pretty sinister things.

  • The level of what can be predicted about you,

  • based on what you like on Facebook,

  • is higher than that your wife would say about you,

  • what your parents or friends can say about you.

  • Cambridge Analytica will try to pick whatever mental weakness

  • or vulnerability that we think you have,

  • and try to warp your perception of what's real around you.

  • Okay, now, that should scare you.

  • Because if you've seen movies, you know that when the person

  • with crazy hair gets stressed out,

  • something really bad is going down.

  • It's like, "They hacked into the main frame.

  • I wouldn't believe you but you got purple dreadlocks."

  • And this was really bad, because, sure,

  • some people might say this is just like advertising.

  • It sounds just like advertising, right?

  • They try to get you to buy something

  • by tugging at your emotions.

  • But this is ten levels above that,

  • because traditional advertisers

  • don't know who you are, personally.

  • Like, imagine if Samsung knew from Facebook data

  • that you lost your dad last week,

  • so they put a message on your feed that their new phone

  • could contact your dad on the other side.

  • You would be way more likely to buy that phone.

  • It would tug at your heartstrings. You'd be like,

  • (crying): "Dad, is that you?

  • "Oh, my God, Dad, is that you?

  • "Can you tell me where you left the keys for the Camaro, please?

  • "I, um, yeah, I can't find them.

  • All right, bye. I love you."

  • Like, they could get to you.

  • And we know, we know that Cambridge Analytica

  • got people's data from Facebook.

  • We know that they figured out how to use this data

  • to manipulate people.

  • What you may not know is who they gave all that power to.

  • TV REPORTER: The data firm hired by Donald Trump's

  • presidential election campaign

  • used secretly obtained information

  • from tens of millions of unsuspecting Facebook users

  • to directly target potential American voters.

  • The entire operation centered around deception,

  • false grassroots support, and a strategy

  • that seems to border on electronic brainwashing.

  • You see, using Cambridge Analytica's tools,

  • Trump's campaign figured out a way to manipulate people,

  • or as they called it, "electronic brainwashing."

  • Which also happens to be the name of my favorite

  • Daft Punk album. Yeah.

  • It's the one with that song that goes like,

  • (electronic-like vocalizing)

  • No, no. It's the other one. The one that goes,

  • (electronic-like vocalizing)

  • Is that the-- No, no. It's the one where it's like,

  • (electronic-like vocalizing)

  • Yeah, that one. That one.

  • Here's an example, here's an example

  • of how the Trump campaign used Cambridge Analytica's tools.

  • Cambridge Analytica figured out that the phrase

  • "drain the swamp" made people angry

  • at career politicians, and this would make them want

  • to vote for Donald Trump, and I'm not making this up.

  • Trump told us this himself.

  • It was a term that was actually given to me.

  • Usually, I like to think them up myself,

  • but this was given to me.

  • But they had this expression, "drain the swamp."

  • And I hated it.

  • I thought it was so hokey.

  • I said that is the hokiest. Give me a break.

  • I'm embarrassed to say it.

  • And I was in Florida,

  • where 25,000 people going wild.

  • And I said, "And we will drain the swamp."

  • The place went crazy.

  • I couldn't believe it.

  • Yeah, neither could we.

  • You know, you always think it's unrealistic

  • when Bond villains reveal their entire scheme,

  • and then you see this, and you're like, yeah.

  • (mimics Trump): "And you see, Mr. Bond, unless someone finds

  • "the hidden switch under my castle,

  • "no one will be able to stop the bomb.

  • That's why-- Oh, he's gone. Oh, no."

  • (normal voice): So thanks to Cambridge Analytica,

  • Trump knew "drain the swamp"

  • would drum up anti-establishment votes.

  • People who might have never voted before.

  • But here's the thing, don't get it twisted.

  • They might be able to use these tools

  • to push you in a certain direction,

  • but they couldn't completely trick you

  • into voting for Donald Trump.

  • And you know how we know this?

  • Because of this:

  • We haven't spoken about the fact that Ted Cruz,

  • who was also a presidential candidate,

  • also used Cambridge Analytica.

  • His campaign was a disaster.

  • Yeah.

  • All the electric brainwashing in the world

  • can't make people like Ted Cruz.

  • All of it.

  • -All of it. -(cheers and applause)

  • Like, you could hypnotize someone.

  • You could you be like, You're a dog. (barks)

  • You're a chicken. (gobbles)

  • You like Ted Cruz. I'm not hypnotized.

  • This is bull. Like, this...

  • Hypnosis doesn't even work, man.

  • Basically, Trump didn't create new fears in people, right?

  • He found a way to appeal to fears and desires

  • that already existed, you know?

  • And they used Facebook,

  • in the same way that Facebook will be like,

  • "Hey, remember your friend Steve from high school?"

  • Except this time it was like, "Hey, remember

  • how you're scared of brown people? Yeah."

  • And I'm gonna be honest with you.

  • The fact that Donald Trump used Cambridge Analytica's tools

  • isn't the worst thing that happened here.

  • Every politician will use the tools

  • at their disposal to get votes.

  • Obama did a similar thing himself.

  • My problem is with Facebook.

  • They need to be held accountable,

  • because not only did they turn a blind eye

  • to Cambridge Analytica using this data,

  • but they also didn't tell their users that this was happening.

  • At the same time, though,

  • it's responsibility to be vigilant.

  • Like, in the year 2018,

  • you just have to assume everything you click online,

  • everything you watch, every website you visit,

  • will be collecting data on you,

  • and that data will be used eventually

  • to try and sell you something.

  • Even the people on the places you trust,

  • they're all just trying to sell you something.

  • Never forget that.

  • And now, a word from our sponsors.

This is a story involving Facebook

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Electronic Brainwashing: Cambridge Analytica's Sinister Facebook Strategy | The Daily Show

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    Samuel posted on 2018/03/23
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