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  • The AlloSphere: it's a three-story metal sphere

  • in an echo-free chamber.

  • Think of the AlloSphere as a large,

  • dynamically varying digital microscope

  • that's connected to a supercomputer.

  • 20 researchers can stand on a bridge

  • suspended inside of the sphere, and be

  • completely immersed in their data.

  • Imagine if a team of physicists

  • could stand inside of an atom

  • and watch and hear electrons spin.

  • Imagine if a group of sculptors

  • could be inside of a lattice of atoms

  • and sculpt with their material.

  • Imagine if a team of surgeons could fly

  • into the brain, as though it was a world,

  • and see tissues as landscapes,

  • and hear blood density levels as music.

  • This is some of the research that you're going to see

  • that we're undertaking at the AlloSphere.

  • But first a little bit about this group

  • of artists, scientists, and engineers

  • that are working together.

  • I'm a composer, orchestrally-trained,

  • and the inventor of the AlloSphere.

  • With my visual artist colleagues, we map

  • complex mathematical algorithms that unfold in time and space,

  • visually and sonically.

  • Our scientist colleagues are finding new patterns

  • in the information.

  • And our engineering colleagues are making

  • one of the largest dynamically varying computers in the world

  • for this kind of data exploration.

  • I'm going to fly you into five research projects

  • in the AlloSphere that are going to take you from

  • biological macroscopic data

  • all the way down to electron spin.

  • This first project is called the AlloBrain.

  • And it's our attempt to quantify beauty

  • by finding which regions of the brain

  • are interactive while witnessing something beautiful.

  • You're flying through the cortex of my colleague's brain.

  • Our narrative here is real fMRI data

  • that's mapped visually and sonically.

  • The brain now a world that we can fly through and interact with.

  • You see 12 intelligent computer agents,

  • the little rectangles that are flying in the brain with you.

  • They're mining blood density levels.

  • And they're reporting them back to you sonically.

  • Higher density levels mean

  • more activity in that point of the brain.

  • They're actually singing these densities to you

  • with higher pitches mapped to higher densities.

  • We're now going to move from real biological data

  • to biogenerative algorithms that create artificial nature

  • in our next artistic and scientific installation.

  • In this artistic and scientific installation, biogenerative algorithms

  • are helping us to understand

  • self-generation and growth:

  • very important for simulation in the nanoscaled sciences.

  • For artists, we're making new worlds

  • that we can uncover and explore.

  • These generative algorithms grow over time,

  • and they interact and communicate as a swarm of insects.

  • Our researchers are interacting with this data

  • by injecting bacterial code,

  • which are computer programs,

  • that allow these creatures to grow over time.

  • We're going to move now from the biological

  • and the macroscopic world,

  • down into the atomic world,

  • as we fly into a lattice of atoms.

  • This is real AFM -- Atomic Force Microscope -- data

  • from my colleagues in the Solid State Lighting and Energy Center.

  • They've discovered a new bond,

  • a new material for transparent solar cells.

  • We're flying through 2,000 lattice of atoms --

  • oxygen, hydrogen and zinc.

  • You view the bond in the triangle.

  • It's four blue zinc atoms

  • bonding with one white hydrogen atom.

  • You see the electron flow with the streamlines

  • we as artists have generated for the scientists.

  • This is allowing them to find the bonding nodes in any lattice of atoms.

  • We think it makes a beautiful structural art.

  • The sound that you're hearing are the actual

  • emission spectrums of these atoms.

  • We've mapped them into the audio domain,

  • so they're singing to you.

  • Oxygen, hydrogen and zinc have their own signature.

  • We're going to actually move even further down

  • as we go from this lattice of atoms

  • to one single hydrogen atom.

  • We're working with our physicist colleagues

  • that have given us the mathematical calculations

  • of the n-dimensional Schrödinger equation in time.

  • What you're seeing here right now is a superposition of an electron

  • in the lower three orbitals of a hydrogen atom.

  • You're actually hearing and seeing the electron flow with the lines.

  • The white dots are the probability wave

  • that will show you where the electron is

  • in any given point of time and space

  • in this particular three-orbital configuration.

  • In a minute we're going to move to a two-orbital configuration,

  • and you're going to notice a pulsing.

  • And you're going to hear an undulation between the sound.

  • This is actually a light emitter.

  • As the sound starts to pulse and contract,

  • our physicists can tell when a photon is going to be emitted.

  • They're starting to find new mathematical structures

  • in these calculations.

  • And they're understanding more about quantum mathematics.

  • We're going to move even further down,

  • and go to one single electron spin.

  • This will be the final project that I show you.

  • Our colleagues in the Center for Quantum Computation

  • and Spintronics are actually measuring with their lasers

  • decoherence in a single electron spin.

  • We've taken this information and we've

  • made a mathematical model out of it.

  • You're actually seeing and hearing

  • quantum information flow.

  • This is very important for the next step in simulating

  • quantum computers and information technology.

  • So these brief examples that I've shown you

  • give you an idea of the kind of work that we're doing

  • at the University of California, Santa Barbara,

  • to bring together, arts, science

  • and engineering

  • into a new age of math, science and art.

  • We hope that all of you will come to see the AlloSphere.

  • Inspire us to think of new ways that we can use

  • this unique instrument that we've created at Santa Barbara.

  • Thank you very much.

  • (Applause)

The AlloSphere: it's a three-story metal sphere

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B2 US TED electron lattice hydrogen data mathematical

【TED】JoAnn Kuchera-Morin: Stunning data visualization in the AlloSphere (Demo: Stunning data visualization in the AlloSphere)

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    Zenn posted on 2018/01/23
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