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  • Hey, It's Linda Raynier of LindaRaynier.com

  • Career Strategist, Speaker and Coach.

  • And in this video, I'm going to teach you 6 tips that'll help you to negotiate a higher salary for yourself.

  • Whether you've just been given a new job offer or you're wanting to ask for a raise,

  • if you know that you deserve more than what you're currently getting,

  • you definitely want to keep the following tips I have for you in mind.

  • All right, so let's dive into Tip #1.

  • And that is, to talk about your value.

  • Personally, I think this is the most important tip and that's why I put it as the first one to discuss.

  • So, in order to justify a bump in salary for yourself,

  • you need to know what your value is,

  • and how you're going to articulate that to your boss or manager.

  • So that means, bringing up any and all evidence that proves why you're worth what you're worth.

  • So you'll bring up instances where you've helped the company to

  • increase profitability for example, or reduce costs.

  • Or you've saved time in certain areas

  • and that you've been recognized as a strong performer.

  • You want to have a list of these types of items ahead of time

  • in your mind, so that when you're in the meeting, you can clearly explain them, one by one.

  • You want to be assertive and tactful, when you explain yourself,

  • but at the same time, calm yet confident.

  • Because when you can do it in a relaxed yet confident way,

  • they have no choice but to really listen to what you're saying.

  • And that is only going to help you in getting closer to getting that bump in salary.

  • Onto Tip #2. Do market research.

  • Now this is pretty much a given for most people,

  • but while you're coming up with your value,

  • you also need to know what the market is paying for someone with your credentials and level of experience.

  • So that means,

  • going out, talking to headhunters,

  • talking to recruiters.

  • They tend to have the most up to date market information.

  • As well as perhaps talking to people who you know

  • who have similar job titles and level of experience as you do.

  • Also, you can rely on Google to find out a range.

  • Although I would be wary with Google because

  • salaries do really differ

  • depending on the region and area that you're looking at.

  • So, whatever information you find through the internet,

  • you want to make sure that it's true to your specific region, your specific local area.

  • Other than that, the most important thing to keep in mind about doing market research

  • is to definitely use more than one resource

  • to determine your expected salary.

  • If you only rely on one person's information

  • and say that's the number that you want,

  • it may turn around and hurt you, because

  • it may not be in line with what the market is paying.

  • So you want to essentially, look at multiple sources,

  • and determine an average number for yourself that you can reasonably expect.

  • Tip #3: Give a number, not a range.

  • So when an employer asks,

  • "What are your salary expectations?"

  • Most candidates tend to tense up and are afraid of offending the employer

  • by giving just one firm number.

  • So instead, they give a range.

  • This is the biggest mistake that I think candidates make.

  • For two reasons.

  • The first reason,

  • it allows the employer to give you lower than what you really wanted.

  • So if you give a range, and the higher number was what you truly wanted,

  • they're probably going to go for the lower number anyway because you said that you were open to that.

  • Despite what you really wanted.

  • So why would you give a range in that case?

  • You just want to give one number.

  • Second reason why it's a big mistake,

  • is that from a hiring manager's perspective,

  • it makes you look a bit wishy washy.

  • It makes it look as though you don't really know what it is that you want in terms of salary,

  • so you're wanting them to make the decision for you.

  • This is not the way to do it.

  • You want to give one number.

  • Now you want to make sure this number is obviously fair,

  • it's deserving,

  • and at the same time, it lines up with what the market is paying.

  • So, there are two numbers that you actually want to keep in mind when it comes to this.

  • There's your, what I call, your "ideal" number

  • and then there's your "willing to settle" number.

  • So your "ideal" number is the number that, if you got this salary,

  • you would be ecstatic, you would be so happy

  • because deep down, you know that that's actually more

  • than what you think, based on someone with your experience and value

  • is truly worth.

  • At least for now.

  • So, the ideal number is generally just slightly higher

  • than what you'd normally expect

  • for someone at your level.

  • Now, the "willing to settle" number

  • is the number that you know is truly justified.

  • It's what you're truly worth and what you deserve.

  • That you shouldn't be getting any less than that, that that's the number that you're worth.

  • So, when you're being asked, "What are your salary expectations?"

  • You actually want to give your ideal number.

  • And the ideal number is not WAY over the mark

  • of your "willing to settle" number,

  • it's maybe about $5K more?

  • So you want to give that number, for the reason that

  • the employer, likely, will look at it

  • and say, cause they'll do their own research.

  • They'll look at it and they'll say,

  • "Okay, this person wants this much."

  • "They feel they're worth this much."

  • "But we feel that the role is worth this much."

  • And they won't really go too far off

  • from your ideal number.

  • Which means that you're going to get your "willing to settle" number.

  • Which is the number that you should truly be expecting anyway.

  • Because that's what the market is paying,

  • and that's what someone with your level and experience is also worth.

  • Tip #4. Go in with leverage.

  • So, whenever you're trying to justify a higher salary for yourself

  • you want to make sure you can leverage everything and anything in your favour.

  • So that means,

  • let's say that you're in a new job offer situation.

  • A company has just handed you a job offer.

  • But at the same time, you know that there may be other offers that may potentially be coming in.

  • You want to let the hiring manager as well as the headhunter or recruiter know that.

  • You want to simply say to them,

  • "Just wanted to let you know, but I'm considering multiple offers at the moment."

  • "So this is one of x number."

  • What that does, is it enhances the 'scarcity' mentality for the hiring manager.

  • Because if they really like you, they'll be willing to pay more if they know you'll be easily snatched up by someone else.

  • Now, in terms of a situation where you may be asking for a raise,

  • and you want to stay at your current company.

  • Then, you don't really want to bring up the fact that you've received multiple job offers

  • or anything like that.

  • I mean, even if you have,

  • all you can really say is, "This is what the market is offering."

  • And that you're fairly confident that this is what the market is offering.

  • So you're going to hint at it but not necessarily outright say it.

  • Because you don't want to mess up the relationship with your employer if you don't plan on leaving the company.

  • On top of that, you want to leverage what we talked about. Which is

  • explain your value. Talk about your achievements.

  • Talk about your accomplishments.

  • Highlight them in a clear and concise way.

  • And you also want to really prove to the employer,

  • your boss, your manager,

  • why you are a top performer.

  • Why you stand out from everyone else.

  • You really want to let them know that you ARE different from the rest of your team.

  • You ARE different from the other people in your department.

  • That you truly do deserve more.

  • So, just simply saying, "You know,

  • ...over the past year, I've done X, Y and Z."

  • "And if you compare me to the rest of the team,"

  • "nobody else has made the same types of accomplishments that I have."

  • "So I know that I do deserve more."

  • I mean it's simply just highlighting

  • the contrast between YOU and the rest of your team.

  • That'll also help you to hopefully, get a bump in your pay.

  • Tip #5. Time it appropriately.

  • If you're in a new job offer situation,

  • the only time when you want to be mentioning what your salary expectation is

  • is when the employer ASKS you.

  • Never bring it up on your own.

  • So this could be right at the beginning,

  • it could be during the interview process

  • or it could be at the very end when you've actually received the job offer.

  • Either way, only bring up your salary expectations when prompted by the employer.

  • Never bring it up on your own,

  • because it makes you look money hungry and this is not the impression you want to be setting.

  • Now if you're in a situation where you want to ask for a raise from your current company,

  • then you want to time it during the performance review time.

  • So most likely, towards the end of the year

  • before the new year begins.

  • 'Cause this is the time when most managers expect for these discussions to happen.

  • So it won't be a surprise coming out of left field.

  • And on top of that, it'll be a good opportunity for you to leverage your performance review results

  • as well as the value discussion that you've prepared ahead of time,

  • and your market research results as well.

  • So you can use all of those to leverage and explain why you deserve a higher salary.

  • And finally, Tip #6. Be humble and polite, yet confident.

  • The whole salary negotiation process is simply one where you're communicating your value and worth to an employer.

  • It's not about being aggressive or greedy.

  • It's just simply about justifying why you're worth what you're worth.

  • And when you can go in with positive intentions,

  • it'll only help to increase your chances of getting a positive result.

  • So now you've learned 6 tips on how to negotiate a higher salary for yourself,

  • whether you're in a new job offer situation or you're simply wanting to ask for a raise.

  • Now if you're also looking to polish up your resume, feel free to download a copy of my resume hacks cheat sheet,

  • located in the link below.

  • It'll give you top resume tips that'll help you to land more interviews and ideally job offers.

  • If you liked this video, then please, give it a thumbs up.

  • Subscribe. Share it with your friends.

  • Thank you so much for watching and I will see you in the next video.

  • Bye!

Hey, It's Linda Raynier of LindaRaynier.com

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Salary Negotiation: 6 Tips on How to Negotiate a Higher Salary

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    Amy.Lin posted on 2018/03/08
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