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  • Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video we are going to talk about love and romance, and

  • all those wonderful relationship words.

  • Okay?

  • So, this video is very important when we're talking about conversational English and English

  • vocabulary, because a lot of what we talk about is relationships.

  • Maybe if we don't have a relationship, we might talk about our friends' relationships

  • or our family's relationships, so it's good to know these words.

  • So, we're going to talk about some of the more common words you'll hear people talk about.

  • For example, maybe you've wondered before: "What's the difference between: 'spouse',

  • 'husband', and 'partner'?

  • When do I use these different terms?"

  • Well, that's a great question.

  • "What do you call a girlfriend or boyfriend when you're in your 60s?"

  • That's a great question, too.

  • So we have a lot of these questions students often ask, so in this video I'm going to answer them.

  • So let's get started.

  • To start with, let's talk about marriage.

  • Okay?

  • Getting married.

  • What do you call somebody who is married?

  • Well, there are multiple things you can call a person who is married.

  • If we're looking at traditional terms, so terms a lot of people use that are more traditional,

  • you might hear somebody talk about "a husband" if they're talking about a man who is married,

  • you might hear them talk about their "hubby" if they're talking about a husband in an informal

  • way.

  • So, for example, I could talk about my husband or my hubby, they have the same meaning and

  • they're talking about a man.

  • I can also, if I'm talking about a woman, we can use the word "wife": "My wife".

  • If we're talking about more than one husband, we can just add an "s" and say: "husbands".

  • And if we're talking about more than one wife, we actually have to change the spelling from

  • "f" to "v" and add an "s", and so this is pronounced: "wives".

  • "Wife", "wives". Okay?

  • So these are women and these are men.

  • We also have another term which I like: "spouse".

  • So, "spouse" is a word that can mean either a husband or a wife, it's a different word,

  • but the point is that it can be a man or a woman. Okay?

  • So you can talk about: "My spouse", "Your spouse", "How long have you and your spouse

  • been married?"

  • If you're having trouble remembering this word, you can think about a mouse, maybe a

  • mouse who's married, that can help you remember the word "spouse" because it rhymes with "mouse".

  • Okay.

  • So these are more the traditional terms we use when we talk about people who are married.

  • We also have less traditional terms that are very common and many people use.

  • A less traditional term might be the term "partner".

  • When we're talking about partner, you have your business partners, but in a relationship

  • when you're talking about romance and love, you can also have a partner.

  • So, "a partner" is someone you are in a relationship with.

  • So, in this case, "partner" can mean that you're married to the person, so maybe you're

  • married, but it's not necessary.

  • So some people use the term "partner" when they're talking about who they're married

  • to, and other people use the word "partner" and they're not married, so it can mean married

  • or not.

  • We can also use "partner"...

  • It's genderless, meaning we don't know if the partner refers to a man, a woman, or a

  • different gender.

  • We also don't know if the person is in a same-sex relationship, or a gay or lesbian relationship,

  • or if they're in a heterosexual or a straight relationship.

  • So, the word "partner" is...

  • It's different than the more traditional terms because there's a lot of information that

  • people might not want to share, so they might use the word "partner" instead.

  • Or maybe "husband" and "wife", those terms don't apply, so they like the word "partner".

  • You might also hear somebody talk about their "life partner", which is another way to say

  • "partner" or their "domestic partner".

  • Another way to talk about somebody you're in a relationship with, if you're in a very

  • serious relationship, is you can talk about your "significant other".

  • So this is a long word, let's say this together: "sig-nif-i-cant".

  • So, "a significant other" is somebody who's been in a relationship with somebody else for...

  • They're in a serious relationship.

  • Again, "significant other" can mean the person is married, but it can also mean they're not

  • married; they can just...

  • They can be in a long-term relationship.

  • So, key point here is: Listen to what people use, and use that.

  • So, for example, if somebody is talking about their husband, you can talk about their husband;

  • if somebody talks about their partner, maybe you might want to use the word "partner",

  • too, when you're talking about them.

  • So listen carefully to how people talk about this, and it's always a good idea to use what

  • people are using.

  • All right, so now let's look at some other key relationship words when we're talking

  • about people in relationships.

  • Okay, so a lot of people have different preferences on how to talk about their relationships.

  • So, we've talked about the word "partner" which can mean you're married to the person

  • or you're dating the person.

  • Another way we can talk about somebody that we're dating or that we're in a relationship

  • with is we can call them "our boyfriend" when we're talking about a man or "our girlfriend"

  • when we're talking about a woman.

  • Some people don't like these terms, especially when they're older because they feel like

  • "boyfriend" and "girlfriend" sound a little bit childish, like you're talking about somebody

  • in high school, and so if you're 60 or 70 years old, maybe you might not like these terms.

  • But other people love these terms and there's...

  • They have no problem saying them.

  • So, again, there's a lot of different people who use different terms.

  • Some people who might not like these terms might use the word "partner" instead, whereas

  • other people might use these.

  • So, "boyfriend" is when we're talking about a man, "girlfriend" is when we're talking

  • about a woman.

  • So, some students wonder: "Why don't we say: 'manfriend' and why don't we say: 'womanfriend'?

  • Doesn't that make more sense when you're talking about older people?"

  • I think you're right, but unfortunately, these terms nobody uses and if you use these terms

  • it wouldn't sound correct, so we do not use the word "manfriend" or "womanfriend"; we

  • use "girlfriend" or "boyfriend".

  • A lot of students also want to know: "How do you talk about your friends who are girls

  • or your friends who are boys that you're not in a relationship with but they're just your friends?"

  • Well, one thing you can do is you can use the word "female friend" instead of "girlfriend".

  • So, in this case, a female friend, you're not in a relationship with.

  • Or you could use the word: "My male friends" when you're talking about men, and, again,

  • you're not in a relationship with them.

  • Okay?

  • So these are ways to talk about friends, whereas these are ways to talk about people you're

  • in a relationship with.

  • All right, the next word I have here: "lover" is something that is not really used. Okay?

  • So, it has a bit of a sexual meaning behind it or connotation, so we don't really use

  • the word "lover", so please, if you're in a relationship and you want to talk about

  • your partner, or your husband, or your wife, don't say: "My lover" because it will kind

  • of weird people out.

  • But you do see this in, for example, Romeo and Juliet: "Star-crossed lovers"; or you

  • might see this in books, especially older books; and some movies, but we don't use it

  • in conversation.

  • You might hear somebody say: "My better half".

  • So, when someone talks about their better half, they're making a joke because they're

  • saying that there's two people in the relationship, and the other person is the better one, the

  • better half of the relationship.

  • So you might have somebody say: "Oh, have you seen my better half?

  • I'm looking for my better half", which might mean: "I'm looking for my boyfriend", or:

  • "I'm looking for my husband", "I'm looking for my partner".

  • Okay?

  • So you do hear this from time to time.

  • Another term we use a lot when we talk about relationships is "couple".

  • "A couple" is two, so when we're talking about a couple and we're talking about relationships,

  • we're talking about two people who are in a relationship.

  • So you might say: "Oh, you know, Romeo and Juliet were a cute couple."

  • Or, you know, you might think about a celebrity pairing: "Oh, you know, Nicole Kidman and

  • Tom Cruise were not a good couple."

  • I don't know, but you can use the term "couple" when you're talking about two people in a relationship.

  • "My bloke", "bloke" is British; we don't use this in Canada or the US, but a lot of people

  • in England will use the term: "My bloke".

  • I don't know about the other parts of Britain, or Australia, or New Zealand.

  • You know, if somebody knows, you can write me in the comments about that, but I know

  • in England they use the word "my bloke" to mean a man you're going out with.

  • So you might say: "Oh, you know, my bloke...

  • I'm seeing my bloke tonight."

  • Again, this isn't something we use in Canada or the US.

  • Okay, so sometimes relationships end and people are really sad, and you're no longer partners,

  • you're no longer boyfriend or girlfriend, you're no longer husband and wife, so what

  • do you call that person when the relationship is finished?

  • You can say: "My ex". Okay?

  • And you can add: "My ex-boyfriend", "My ex-girlfriend", "My ex-wife", "My ex-husband" or you can just

  • say: "My ex". Okay?

  • So this is when a relationship is broken, it's over, this is what you call the person.

  • So now let's look at a couple more expressions we use when we're talking about relationships.

  • Okay, so we've talked about all these relationship terms.

  • One thing a lot of people notice is that a lot of our relationship terms have the word

  • "law" in it, so I'm going to talk about some of these terms and what they mean.

  • So the first type of "law" term we're going to talk about is "common-law".

  • Some people are in a common-law relationship or a common-law partnership.

  • What "common-law" means is it means that two people love...

  • Or are together in a relationship, they live together, but they're not married. Okay?

  • So this is a common-law relationship.

  • Depending on the country you're in, the amount of time you have to live together might vary,

  • so in some places it might be you've lived together for two years, now you're in a common-law

  • relationship; in other places it might be longer or shorter.

  • So, again: "common-law", you're not married but you live together.

  • So this is very different from the next term I'm going to teach you, which is "in-law".

  • What's "an in-law"?

  • "An in-law" is a person who is family through marriage. Okay?

  • So, family through marriage is an in-law, and we have different types of in-laws.