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  • >> SiliconANGLE Media presents theCUBE!

  • Covering the Alibaba Cloud annual conference.

  • Brought to you by Intel.

  • Now, here's John Furrier...

  • >> Hello everyone, welcome to exclusive coverage with SiliconANGLE, Wikibon, and theCUBE here

  • in Hangzhou, China for Alibaba Cloud's annual event here in Cloud City, the whole town is

  • a Cloud.

  • This is their event with developers, music festivals, and again, theCUBE coverage.

  • Our next guest is Dhiraj Mallick, who is the Vice President of the Data Center Group, and

  • the General Manager of Innovation, Pathfinding, and Architecture Group.

  • That's a mouthful.

  • Basically the CTO of the Data Center Group, trying to figure out the next big thing.

  • >> That's right, John.

  • >> Thanks for spending the time.

  • >> It's my pleasure.

  • >> We're here in China, it's-- You know in the U.S., we're looking at China, and we say

  • okay, the fourth largest Cloud, Alibaba Cloud?

  • >> Yes.

  • >> Going outside of Mainland China, going global.

  • You guys are strategic partners with them.

  • >> Yes.

  • >> They need a lot of compute, they need a lot of technology.

  • Is this the path that you're finding for Intel?

  • >> Yeah, so we've been collaborators with Alibaba for over 10 years, and we view them

  • as a very strategic partner.

  • They're one of the Super Seven, which is our top seven Cloud providers, and certainly in

  • China, they're a very relevant customer for many years.

  • We engage with them on a variety of fronts.

  • On the technology side, we engage with them on what their key pinpoints are, what is the

  • problems they want to be solving three to five years out, and then we co-develop, or

  • co-architect solutions with them.

  • >> So, I want to get your take on the event here in China, and how it relates to the global

  • landscape, because I, it's my first time here, and I was taken back by the booth.

  • I walked through Alibaba's booth, and obviously Jack Ma is inspirational.

  • Steve Jobs like the culture, and artistry and science coming together, but I walked

  • through the booth, it's almost too good to be true.

  • They've got Quantum Computing, a Patent Wall, they've got Hybrid Cloud, they got security,

  • they have IoT examples with The City Brain, a lot of great tech here at Alibaba Cloud.

  • >> So I think the technologies that they're investing in are very, very impressive.

  • Most cloud companies are probably not as far along as them, and looking at such a broad

  • range of technologies, the Brain Project is really exciting, because it's going to be

  • the Nexus of smart cities, both in China, as well as globally.

  • The second thing that's very interesting is their research and investments in Quantum.

  • While Quantum is not here today, it's certainly on the frontier, and Intel also has significant

  • investments in sort of unpacking where Quantum will go, and what promises it offers to address.

  • >> What I find interesting is that also hearing the positioning of, I kind of squint through

  • the positioning, they're almost talking Cloud-native, DevOps, but they have all this goodness under

  • the hood, and they're kind of talking IT-transitioning to Data Technology.

  • Everything's about data to these guys, not just collecting data, using data with software.

  • Now, that's really critical, because isn't that software-defined, data-driven is a hot

  • trend?

  • >> Yes, software-defined and data-driven is a very hot trend, in fact at Intel our CEO

  • and us all believe that we've entered the data economy, and that the explosion in data

  • is, and the thirst for analyzing that data to be able to drive smart business analytics

  • is really the key to this digital revolution.

  • I was reading an industry report by one of the analysts that said by 2019 there would

  • have been over 100 billion dollars spent on business intelligence.

  • And so, the real key is this data economy.

  • >> The intersection of things, and even industrial internet, IIot, Industrial Iot, with artificial

  • intelligence AI, intelligence Intel inside that word, interesting play on words--

  • >> Yes.

  • >> Is coming together, and we've covered what you guys were doing on Mobile World Congress

  • this year, where 5G was clearly an end-to-end architecture.

  • You got FPGAs, all this goodness here going on.

  • So that's 5G, and that's going to fuel a lot of IoT if you think of it like that way, but

  • now AI.

  • >> Yes.

  • >> It's Software.

  • How does that connect?

  • Because that's the path we see forward on the Wikibon analyst side, we see software

  • eating the world, but data eating software.

  • And now you got 5G creating more data.

  • >> Yeah, so the way we look at it at Intel is, we have data-center technologies that

  • are fueled by the growth at the Edge by IoT devices, because they're creating demand for

  • more processing capability to be able to unpack and analyze that information, and it's a self-fulfilling

  • circle.

  • We call it the virtual cycle of growth, because the data center feeds IoT demand and then

  • IoT feeds the data center.

  • And so it's the combination of those.

  • What 5G does, is 5G forms the connectivity fabric between the data center and the Edge.

  • It allows data to be pre-positioned at the correct places in the network, so that you

  • minimize latencies through the network, and can process or do the analytics on it as quickly

  • as you possibly can.

  • >> So we were talking before we came on camera about Jack Ma, they call him Jackie Ma here,

  • keynote being very inspirational, and talking moving to a new industrial era, a digital

  • economy, all that good stuff, very, very inspirational.

  • Let's translate that into the data center transformation, because we're seeing the data

  • center and the Cloud with Hybrid Cloud become really critical to support what you were just

  • talking about which is, how do you put it all together?

  • It sounds so easy, but it really is difficult.

  • >> It is, and so our vision is that in order to be able to fulfill this data economy, we

  • will need to have five key innovations in the data center.

  • The first innovation, in no particular order, is that the data center will be frictionless.

  • And what I mean by frictionless, is that there will be zero to low latencies in order to

  • provide that real-time experience at the Edge.

  • So latency is extremely critical, and the way we believe that that can be achieved is

  • by moving from copper to light.

  • And Intel has significant investments in leadership products and silicon photonics that will enable

  • switches to be based on photonics.

  • It'll enable CPUs, and server hosts to be based on light.

  • So we believe that light is a critical aspect to this success.

  • The second aspect of frictionless is the need for liquid cooling and that was in the keynotes

  • from Simon Hu this morning, that the liquid cooling is going to be essential to be able

  • to enable a lot more horsepower in these data centers to be able to handle the volume of

  • data that's coming.

  • >> So you guys obviously with the photonics and the liquid cooling, you guys have been

  • working on this in your labs for a long time, it's great R&D, but you need the connective

  • tissue because with 5G you're now talking about a ubiquitous RF cloud, powering autonomous

  • vehicles.

  • We're seeing the Brain Project here, ET Brain, the City Brain--

  • >> Yes.

  • >> Which is essentially IoT and big data being a big application that they're showcasing.

  • What's the connective tissue?

  • How does that work, from the data center, to the Edge?

  • What's Intel's position?

  • How do you see it?

  • And what's going to unfold in front of our eyes?

  • >> Yeah, so two things, so number one, I believe that the data center is boundary-less.

  • It's not based on four physical walls.

  • It's a connected link between the data center, and all the Edge devices that you called IoT.

  • In order to fulfill this, you have to have 5G technology.

  • We're invested in Silicon, in radio technologies, as well as in driving the 5G industry in consortia,

  • to be able to bring 5G solutions to market.

  • We think that 5G, as well as a tiered architecture between the Edge to the center, where you

  • do some processing at the Edge, the radio stations, some in intermediate data centers,

  • and then some in the back end Cloud data center, is what's going to be essential, and Intel

  • has significant investments, both in developing this distributed hierarchical architecture,

  • as well as in 5G.

  • >> That's a great point.

  • I want to just unpack that, and double-click on it a little bit, because you mentioned

  • data at the Edge, and you also said earlier, low latency.

  • Okay, a lot of people have been talking about, it costs you speed and time to move data around.

  • So there's no real one general architecturing, where you have to kind of decide the architecture

  • for the use case.

  • >> Yes.

  • >> So, the beauty is in the eye of the beholder, whoever has the workloads or the equipment.

  • >> Yes.

  • >> How do you look at that, because now you're thinking about, if I don't want to move data

  • around, maybe you shouldn't, maybe you want to move data around.

  • How does that fit with the Cloud of model, because we're seeing Cloud being a great use

  • case for IoT in one instance, and maybe not in another.

  • How do you think about that?

  • How should practitioners think about the data architecture?

  • >> Yeah, so our vision is that the Cloud changes from a centralized Cloud, to a distributed

  • Cloud, and is amorphoused between the Edge where the IoT devices are, and the backend,

  • and the way to think about it perhaps, is to say that storage as people have envisioned

  • it, as being centralized, that paradigm has to change, and storage has to become distributed,

  • such that data is available at different points in the network, and my vision is that you

  • don't want to move data around, you want to minimize data movement for most use cases,

  • and you want to have it pre-positioned on the 5G network, and you want to move the compute

  • to the data, that's more energy-efficient.

  • >> So I got to ask you, as someone who's doing the path-finding, which is the future path

  • for Intel, and innovation and architecture.

  • I was talking with some practitioners recently at another event, and trying to find someone,

  • because I don't speak Chinese very well.

  • But they asked me the same question.

  • It matters what's in my Cloud.

  • And what they mean by their Cloud, either on-premise private Cloud that they're putting

  • together, operating model of their business, now going Cloud-like.

  • But also as they pick their Cloud provider, they want to have multi-Cloud, and so what's

  • in their Cloud, and their Cloud provider's matters.

  • You guys are the inside of the Cloud across many spectrums, Intel.

  • >> Yes.

  • >> How should a customer think about that question?