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  • So it's been a while

  • since we've done one of these

  • QnA videos,

  • so we asked you guys on Twitter

  • to send us your most burning questions

  • And I know that the number one question right now

  • is: Martina what the [email protected]#k is up with your look today?

  • I don't-- Listen, guys---

  • You are a hot mess! What is going on, girl?

  • RuPaul, I'm sorry

  • I wanted to have purple lips,

  • but then I put it on and I changed my mind

  • because then I started to wear this really bright cute shirt,

  • and I was like, "It doesn't match my lips,"

  • but you can't take lipstain off because

  • it leaves, like, a mucky, dirty--it looks like you ate, like, a chocolate cupcake

  • SILENCE!

  • Wait, let me finish--my hair!

  • I've made up my mind Martina: But my hair!

  • It's time for you to lip-sync

  • **FOR YOUR LIFE**

  • The actual real number one question

  • that we wound up getting is

  • basically, choose between Korea and Japan!

  • Thanks a lot, guys!

  • Thanks for the super easy one that I'm sure is not going to piss off anybody with this answer,

  • Yeah.

  • But we've thought long and hard about this

  • we've spent almost a full year here in Japan

  • looked over all of the data that we've compiled

  • and I could easily say very quickly,

  • I'd pick Japan over Korea.

  • Now wait!

  • Wait!

  • Angry commenters! Stop! Give me a chance to explain!

  • We're gonna talk about our reasonings here and then

  • we're gonna give you our disclaimers afterwards,

  • but please hear us out before you get angry

  • and if at the end of the video you're still upset with our

  • answer, then please feel free to let us know in the comment section below.

  • Yes. Now despite this year and last year being

  • some of the worst years for my health,

  • slowly, slowly goin' downhill,

  • I can say this has been the happiest year of my life.

  • Happiest year of my life as well.

  • I've thought about this year,

  • all of the years that I've had in Korea,

  • and all of the years that I can remember in Canada,

  • This, by far, has been the greatest year of my entire life.

  • Mhm. You know what I find funny?

  • We often find ourselves coming home on our bicycles being like,

  • Lala-Lala-lala

  • I'm happy for no reason!

  • Martina: I'm just...happy Simon: I'm happy here!

  • Martina: I'm just happy.

  • 56 00:01:45,580 --> 00:01:47,580 Martina: I just like smiling; smiling is the thing to do! Simon: Smiling is the best!

  • Allow us to explain what has made us happy. I'd like to begin with

  • the first category, which I call: Neighbors and Sounds

  • We were worried before we came to Japan.

  • A lot of people told us that it is going to be very difficult for us here,

  • that Japanese people are very cold and reserved

  • and they won't be very welcoming to us

  • and we're gonna have a tough time here.

  • But when we came here to our neighborhood,

  • I am amazed at how warm and loving our neighbors are.

  • And it wasn't just one neighbor.

  • Like, our neighbor across the street,

  • whenever we bike home and I see her there, I'm happy to speak with her.

  • Our neighbors to the left and to the right, we chat with..

  • Actually, one of our other neighbors like, rang on our doorbell

  • and invited us out for dinner

  • and we went out for dinner with him

  • and it was so amazing and touching because

  • in all of the years that we've been in Korea

  • and all of the different places that we lived in Korea

  • Did we ever have any contact with the neighbors?

  • All of them were very cold and distant

  • They weren't warm as they are here

  • I did not expect our neighborhood to be so warm and caring

  • and I love it here and it makes me so happy.

  • Now I will say that it could definitely be because we're in an actual neighborhood

  • and maybe if we moved to like an apartment in Japan

  • we would experience the same thing.

  • Simon: Possibly. Martina: Maybe it would be like, people don't wanna talk to you and stuff.

  • It makes me feel immensely happy to come home,

  • I feel proud of my little house,

  • I'm excited to decorate the outside with Christmas lights!

  • My neighbors came over,

  • the neighbors right beside us that speak like, no English at all

  • and they're like, "Oh, Chrisamus!"

  • and I was like, super excited

  • so I'm having just, warm, wonderful feelings.

  • I feel warm here. I feel welcome here,

  • and I did not feel welcome in Korea.

  • And also, our neighborhood is very quiet.

  • and I can't emphasize enough how important this is for us

  • because what's great about having a quiet neighborhood like this

  • is that I can sleep an entire night without waking up. Martina: Yeah.

  • Pretty much every morning in Korea

  • no matter where we lived

  • we would wake up from honking of horns

  • we would wake up from people like talking or yelling outside

  • It was like a never-ending barrage of sound.

  • This sounds like an old person thing to say,

  • but I cannot emphasize enough

  • how important it is to get a good night's sleep.

  • And I sleep so well here.

  • I think the best way to describe living in Seoul

  • is basically living in New York City.

  • Martina: I used to visit-- Simon: Right, I think that's a fair comparison.

  • I used to visit New York all the time

  • and then we stayed with our brother in law, he used to live in New York as well

  • Simon: Yeah.

  • And it was like, you heard fighting and screaming and honking,

  • and like, people yelling, and--Seoul is like New York City.

  • Simon: Right. Martina: It is the city that doesn't sleep,

  • I would say that Seoul "does-not-sleep" even more than New York Simon: Yeah!

  • You sleep even less!

  • Martina: Yeah, when Jackie came to visit

  • (my best friend visited me, she lives in New York)

  • Simon: Right. Martina: She said said like, "I thought New York was the place that didn't sleep, but I was wrong, it is totally Seoul."

  • Simon: Right. Martina: I agree with that.

  • Simon: Yeah. Martina: So that is something that has grated on our 'old people' nerves

  • I like to sleep!

  • Martina: We're-- Simon: I wanna live in a city that sleeps!

  • *Old woman voice*: When we were younger-- Simon: *Laughing* When--yes!

  • *Old woman voice*: When we were younger, it was okay!

  • Simon: Right! Now I'm old and $h!t,

  • Simon: I don't wanna have--

  • Martina *singing*: I wanna sleep inside Simon: I wanna snuggle up

  • Martina *singing*: a city that goes to bed!

  • Simon: That's it. Martina (spoken): At reasonable-hours-like-maybe-nine-or-ten-PM.

  • Martina *singing*: And have a noise pollution rule!

  • *crickets chirping* Martina *singing*: You're goin' to sleep..

  • *crickets chirping* Martina: cute fake snoring sound Simon: I don't know what song that is.

  • Martina: 'New York New York'? Simon: Okay.

  • Martina: Frank Sinatra? Simon: Alright.

  • Martina: Oh my god! Simon: What is this?

  • Martina *singing*: I wanna wake up in the city that doesn't sleep--

  • Martina (normal voice): And I twisted it around *sigh*

  • I don't know old white people music. Martina: You don't-- *shattering glass*

  • Sorry.

  • I really thought you were just making up a really $!t#y song.

  • Martina: *disbelieving laugh and exclamation* Simon: And it was really--

  • That's like, what the hell are you singing?

  • Martina *singing*: And be the king of the--

  • *Chimes*

  • It's not just our neighbors that are welcoming.

  • One of the things that really bothered me in my experiences in Korea is that

  • there were many times that I would go into like,

  • coffee shops or stores or whatnot in Korea

  • and whenever the people would see me,

  • they would be afraid like, "Oh! Oh no!"

  • Or they would like, grab another person and

  • push them towards me.

  • Or, if I would try to order something in Korean, they'd be like,

  • "Ah, I don't understand!"

  • And my Korean is significantly better than my Japanese,

  • and I have never felt that here in Japan.

  • I have never felt unwelcome,

  • I have, like--Nobody was ever afraid of me,

  • they understand my terrible pronunciation of Japanese.

  • Martina: Which, by the way, I've found that really shocking. Simon: Mhm.

  • Simon: Yes! Martina: Because in eight years Simon: Yeah

  • Martina: We learned to read Korean, Simon: Right!

  • Martina: we could speak Korean, Simon: Right!

  • Martina: So we could go to a restaurant that had only Korean menus,

  • we could look it over, we could call them over Simon: Yeah.

  • and then we would start ordering

  • and the people would literally--and were, they thought it was funny--

  • But they're with each other, they'd be like, "Haha-haha" Simon: Yeah.

  • And I, I was like, "Okay, but we're not even speaking English." Simon: Uh-huh.

  • But in Japan, we butcher the language