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  • The stone-humped hag,

  • the angels,

  • Silver Knight Ledo.

  • Alva and Zullie,

  • and the Murkmen.

  • At the end of the world, much is explained,

  • for characters are ripped here from all ages, all cycles,

  • without too much regard for context.

  • And some, like the Dragonslayer Armor,

  • even came from our age,

  • an age that ended long ago.

  • This armor has seen it all:

  • Once, it was worn by a legendary dragonslayer,

  • and it lost its master,

  • but it retained the memory of the fights it had against the Arch-dragons.

  • Memories that were so potent, the armor itself --

  • imbued with a soul, admittedly -- still remembered

  • their sporting hunts.

  • And left behind in Lothric,

  • it came to be manipulated by the Pilgrim Butterflies,

  • dark beings that may well be counterpoint

  • to the angels that we'll get into later,

  • who settled there as Lothric's age drew to a close.

  • And now,

  • deep in the Abyssal swamp, the armor,

  • it reads, was defeated by the Champion of Ash

  • in Lothric, and was left ages to rust.

  • Until it was possessed, once again,

  • by the memory of the hunt.

  • And why I start the video with this armor

  • is because I really want to talk about how ages HAVE passed.

  • Remember when you placed the cinders, and

  • you were teleported to a ruined shrine?

  • Everything and everyone here in the Dreg Heap --

  • including Gael, including Lapp --

  • they might not have done these things,

  • but they still made it to the very end of an era.

  • And, of course, a couple more minor

  • characters made it here. Though

  • their stories have always been just below the surface.

  • "One was a wayfaring knight,

  • on an endless, forbidden search.

  • Only the Abyss granted closure,

  • if not reunion with his beloved."

  • Honestly, most of us probably only know Alva

  • as that one red phantom who invades in Irithyll.

  • But he's featured in TWO games now,

  • and he has a story worth telling, although admittedly,

  • this is a story that the game explicitly

  • tells us, for once. There's not much

  • guesswork to be done here. So this is a tale

  • of three characters: Alva, Saint Serreta,

  • and Zullie, the witch.

  • Alva was a wayfaring knight who made it his quest

  • to search for a cure

  • for Saint Serreta's sickness.

  • He fully dedicated himself to this cause,

  • to the point where he eventually punished himself

  • for his failures. His search

  • would end up being quite famous, for

  • many bards would eventually sing tales

  • of his travels, and, of course, his involvement

  • with the witch.

  • Zullie is the witch, somone

  • referenced to employ heretical magical crafts,

  • which are said to be widely misunderstood,

  • forcing her to wear a veil when she traveled,

  • rather than the pointed hat she would wear sometimes

  • with a deep, unspoken sense of pride.

  • Zullie heard of Alva's dedication

  • to Saint Serreta, and decided to use

  • all manner of tricks and deceit to ruin him.

  • Perhaps she was trying to demonstrate

  • the fragility of faith, or

  • that dedication of man is ultimately a pointless thing.

  • And so,

  • her wtichcraft assumedly played a part in this,

  • but we also hear

  • that she intended to seduce Alva.

  • Zullie, however, never loved anyone, nor was she

  • loved in return.

  • But, as it turns out,

  • in trying to seduce him and trying to make him

  • fail, it's as if she accidentally

  • found some admiration for the man.

  • In the end, Alva would not find a cure

  • for Saint Serreta's sickness, and,

  • as a result,

  • wracked with guilt and remorse,

  • he relinquished his knighthood.

  • However, he, and Zullie the witch,

  • eventually both found their purpose in life

  • in each other.

  • Zullie, as unloving as she was unloved,

  • became Alva's closest supporter.

  • And Alva,

  • despite failing his saint and his purpose,

  • would accept the aid of the witch

  • who once plotted against him.

  • And that's the story in a nutshell.

  • But one more thing: Alva is named "seeker of the spurned"

  • in Dark Souls 3. Which is an odd

  • title, because to "spurn" something is to

  • reject it with disdain, and the only

  • real candidate for that, in this story,

  • is Zullie, who was spurned as a witch.

  • So, if he's the "seeker of the spurned"

  • than at this point of the story in Dark Souls 3,

  • he must, logically, be seeking Zullie.

  • And the implication, I think, is that

  • they're finally reunited in the Ringed City.

  • "Only the Abyss granted closure,

  • if not reunion with his beloved."

  • The implication in this quote, with Alva's invasion

  • in front of Zullie's set as well,

  • is that Alva was finally reunited with the witch

  • in the city that was losing itself to the Abyss.

  • And, as we'll get into in the video

  • about the locusts and the Ringed Knights --

  • subscribe for that --

  • perhaps the Abyss is not so evil after all.

  • But there's something else I wanna talk about: it's that, in Japanese,

  • the word for "spurned" is pulled from "imi",

  • which is a noun with a significant degree of nuance.

  • We have to thank Loremaster Nojah

  • for helping us out with this.

  • Because the word "imi", which they pulled the word

  • "spurned" from, in Japanese means something

  • more like a taboo, a shunned person,

  • or, strangely,

  • a purification rite. And obviously,

  • searching for purification or absolution

  • is very different to searching for a

  • shunned person. And I thought it was weird he was titled

  • "seeker of the spurned", which is why I brought this up.

  • And I'm glad I learned about the word "imi", because its definitions --

  • both "seeker of the spurned" and

  • "seeker of purification" --

  • both are definitions that fit with the story.

  • Because, at once, Alva is the seeker of Zullie

  • the shunned, and reunites with her in the Ringed City.

  • But also, he is wracked with guilt and remorse

  • over failing to find a cure for Saint Serreta,

  • and, as a result, he could be searching for absolution

  • and purification

  • and release from his sin, which is a word

  • that "imi" implied.

  • Zullie, on the other hand,

  • appears to enter the service of the Judicator Giant --

  • a character we'll talk about later -- who enlists,

  • by force or otherwise, the most

  • powerful beings who come down here

  • seeking the Dark Soul.

  • One of these phantoms is Ledo

  • of the Silver Knights, who invades us properly

  • in a tower far above the Abyssal Swamp,

  • swinging that great, stone-imbued hammer around.

  • But when you finally get your hands on it, you discover

  • that this giant rock would've made Havel proud.

  • And it probably did. It's description says that Ledo

  • was a traveling eccentric. Someone who befriended

  • both Havel -- probably because they both loved rocks --

  • and giants, as well. Which might explain

  • why he's summoned by the Judicator Giant.

  • I came across a great

  • Ledo theory in the comments of this video

  • a few days ago, when it was released early for patrons.

  • Salim B. comments that Ledo

  • could've been the friend that imprisoned

  • Havel the Rock in Dark Souls 1. And it's

  • a great theory, looking back.

  • The Watchtower Basement Key tells us that there are rumors

  • of a hero-turned-Hollow, who was

  • locked away by a dear friend. And, of course,

  • this is a reference to Havel, but back then, we assumed

  • that the friend who locked him away was most likely Gwyn,