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  • Samadhi

  • is an ancient Sanskrit word, for which there is no modern equivalent.

  • There is a fundamental challenge with making a film about Samadhi.

  • Samadhi points to something that can’t be conveyed on the level of mind.

  • This film is simply the outer manifestation of my own inner journey.

  • The intention is not to teach you about Samadhi, or provide information for your mind, but

  • to inspire you to directly discover your true nature.

  • Samadhi is relevant now more than ever.

  • We are at a time in history where we have not only forgotten Samadhi, but we have forgotten

  • what we forgot.

  • This forgetting is Maya, the illusion of the self.

  • As humans most of us live immersed in our daily lives, with little thought of who we

  • are, why we are here, or where were going.

  • Most of us have never realized the true self, the soul or what the Buddha called annata

  • - that which is beyond name and form, beyond thinking.

  • As a result we believe we are these limited bodies.

  • We live in fear, either conscious or unconscious, that the limited self structure that we are

  • identified with, will die.

  • In today's world the vast majority of people who are engaged in religious or spiritual

  • practices such as yoga, prayer, meditation, chanting or any kind of ritual, are practicing

  • techniques which are conditioned.

  • Which means they are just part of the ego construct.

  • The seeking and the activity isn’t the problem- thinking you have found the answer in some

  • external form is the problem.

  • Spirituality in its most common form is no different than the pathological thinking that

  • is going on everywhere.

  • It is a further agitation of the mind.

  • More human doing, as opposed to human being.

  • The ego construct wants more money, more power, more love, more of everything.

  • Those on the so-called spiritual path desire to be more spiritual, more awake, more equanimous,

  • more peaceful, more enlightened.

  • The danger for you watching this film is that your mind will want to acquire Samadhi . Even

  • more dangerous is that your mind might think it has acquired Samadhi.

  • Whenever there is a desire to attain something you can be sure that it is the ego construct

  • at work.

  • Samadhi is not about attaining or adding anything to yourself.

  • To realize Samadhi is to learn to die before you die.

  • Life and death are like yin and yang- an inseparable continuum.

  • Endlessly unfolding, with no beginning and no end.

  • When we push away death, we also push away life.

  • When you experience the truth directly of who you are, there is no longer fear of life

  • or death.

  • We are told who we are by our society and our culture, and at the same - time we are

  • slaves to the deeper unconscious biological craving and aversion that governs our choices.

  • The ego construct is nothing more than the impulse to repeat.

  • It is simply the path that energy once took and the tendency for the energy to take that

  • path again, whether it is positive or negative for the organism.

  • There are endless levels of memory or mind, spirals within spirals.

  • When your consciousness identifies with this mind or ego construct, it ties you to social

  • conditioning, which you could call the matrix.

  • There are aspects of the ego that we can be conscious of, but it is the unconscious, the

  • archaic wiring, the primal existential fears, that are actually driving the whole machine.

  • Endless patterns of grasping towards pleasure and avoidance of pain are sublimated into

  • pathological behaviours .... our work.... our relationships.... our beliefs, our very

  • thoughts, and our whole way of living.

  • Like cattle, most humans live and die in passive subjugation, feeding their lives to the matrix.

  • We live lives locked into narrow patterns.

  • Lives often filled with great suffering, and it never occurs to us that we can actually

  • become free.

  • It is possible to let go of the life that has been inherited from the past, to live

  • the one that is waiting to come forth through the inner world.

  • We were all born into this world with biological conditioned structures, but without self awareness.

  • Often when you look into a young child's eyes there is no trace of self, only luminous emptiness.

  • The person one grows into is a mask worn over consciousness.

  • Shakespeare said, "All the world's a stage, and all the men and women merely players".

  • In an awakened individual, consciousness shines through the personality, through the mask.

  • When you are awake, you don't become identified with your character.

  • You don't believe that you are the masks that you are wearing.

  • But nor do you give up playing a role.

  • Twenty-four hundred years after Plato wrote the Republic, humanity is still making its

  • way out of Plato's cave.

  • In fact we may be more transfixed by illusions than ever.

  • Plato had Socrates describe a group of people who lived chained in a cave all of their lives,

  • facing a blank wall.

  • All they could see were shadows projected on the wall by the things passing in front

  • of a fire which was behind them.

  • This puppet show becomes their world.

  • According to Socrates, the shadows were as close as the prisoners would ever get to seeing

  • reality.

  • Even after being told about the outside world they continued to believe that the shadows

  • were all that is.

  • Even if they suspected there was something more they were unwilling to leave what was

  • familiar.

  • Humanity today is like the people who have only seen the shadows on the cave wall.

  • The shadows are analogous to our thoughts.

  • The world of thinking is the only world that we know.

  • But there is another world that is beyond thinking.

  • Beyond the dualistic mind.

  • Are you willing to leave the cave, to leave all that you have known to find out the truth

  • of who you are?

  • In order to experience Samadhi it is necessary to turn attention away from the shadows, away

  • from the thoughts towards the light.

  • When a person is only used to darkness then they must gradually become accustomed to the

  • light.

  • Like acclimatizing to any new paradigm it takes time and effort, and a willingness to

  • explore the new, as well as shed the old.

  • The mind can be likened to a trap for consciousness, a labyrinth or a prison.

  • It is not that you are in prison, you are the prison.

  • The prison is an illusion.

  • If you are identified with an illusory self, then you are asleep.

  • Once you are aware of the prison, if you fight to get out of the illusion, then you are treating

  • the illusion as if it is real and you still remain asleep, except now the dream becomes

  • a nightmare.

  • You will be chasing and running from shadows forever.

  • Samadhi is awakening from the dream of the separate self or the egoic construct.

  • Samadhi is awakening from identification with the prison that I call me.

  • You can never actually be free, because wherever you go your prison is there.

  • Awakening is not about get rid of the mind or the matrix, on the contrary; when you are

  • not identified with it, then you can experience the play of life more fully, enjoying the

  • show as it is, without craving or fear.

  • In the ancient teachings this was called the divine game of Leila: the game of playing

  • in duality.

  • Human consciousness is a continuum.

  • On one extreme, humans are identified with the material self.

  • On the other extreme is Samadhi, the cessation of self.

  • Every step we take on the continuum towards Samadhi, brings less suffering.

  • Less suffering does not mean life is free from pain.

  • Samadhi is beyond the duality of pain and pleasure.

  • What it means is that there is less mind, less self creating resistance to whatever

  • unfolds and that resistance is what creates suffering.

  • Realizing Samadhi even once allows you to see what is at the other end of the continuum.

  • To see that there is something other than the material world and self interest.

  • When there is an actual cessation of the self structure in Samadhi there is no egoic thought,

  • no self, no duality yet there is still the I am, annata or no self.

  • In that emptiness is the dawn of prajna or wisdom- the understanding that the immanent

  • self is far beyond the play of duality, beyond the entire continuum.

  • The immanent self is timeless, unchanging, always now.

  • Enlightenment is the merging of the primordial spiral, the ever-changing manifested world

  • or lotus in which time unfolds, with your timeless being.

  • Your inner wiring grows like an ever-unfolding flower as you disidentify with the self, becoming

  • a living bridge between the world of time and the timeless.

  • Merely realizing the immanent self is only the beginning of one’s path.

  • Most people will have to experience and lose Samadhi countless times in meditation before

  • they are able to integrate it into other facets of life.

  • It is not unusual to have profound insights into the nature of your being during meditation

  • or self inquiry, only to find yourself once again falling back into old patterns, forgetting

  • the truth of who you are.

  • To realize that stillness or emptiness in every facet of life, every facet of one’s

  • self, is to become emptiness dancing as all things.

  • Stillness is not something separate from movement.

  • It is not opposite to movement.

  • In Samadhi stillness is recognized to be identical with movement, form is identical to emptiness.

  • This is nonsensical to the mind because mind is the coming into being of duality.

  • Rene Descartes, the father of western philosophy, is famous for the saying “I think therefore

  • I am”.

  • No other phrase more clearly encapsulates the fall of civilisation and the full scale

  • identification with the shadows on the cave wall.

  • Descarteserror, like the error of almost all humans, was the equating of fundamental

  • being with thinking.

  • At the beginning of his most famous treatise, Descartes wrote that almost everything can

  • be called into doubt; he can doubt his senses, and even his thoughts.

  • Likewise in the Kalama Sutra the Buddha said that in order to ascertain the truth, one

  • must doubt all traditions, scriptures, teachings and all of the content of one’s mind and

  • senses.

  • Both of these men started with great scepticism, but the difference was that Descartes stopped

  • inquiring at the level of thinking, while the Buddha went deeper- he penetrated beyond

  • the deepest levels of the mind.

  • Maybe if Descartes had gone beyond his thinking mind, he would have realized his true nature

  • and Western consciousness would be very different today.

  • Instead, Descartes described the possibility of an evil demon that could be keeping us

  • under a veil of illusion.

  • Descartes did not recognize this evil demon for what it was.

  • As in the movie the Matrix, we could all be hooked up to some elaborate program feeding

  • us an illusory dream world.

  • In the movie, humans lived out their lives in the matrix, while on another level they

  • were merely batteries, feeding their life force to the machines which used their energy

  • for their own agenda.

  • People always want to blame something outside of themselves for the state of the world or

  • for their own unhappiness.

  • Whether it is a person, a particular group or country, religion or some kind of controlling

  • Illuminati like Descartesevil demon, or the sentient machines in the Matrix.

  • Ironically, the demon that Descartes envisioned was the very thing that he defined himself

  • by.

  • When you realize Samadhi, it becomes clear that there is a controller, there is a machine,

  • and evil demon leaching your life day after day.

  • The machine is you.

  • Your self structure is made up of many little conditioned sub-programs or little bosses.

  • One little boss that craves food, another craves money, another status, position, power,

  • sex, intimacy.

  • Another wants consciousness or attention from others.

  • The desires are literally endless and can never be satisfied.

  • We spend a lot of our time and energy decorating our prisons, succumbing to pressures to improve

  • our masks, and feeding the little bosses, making them more powerful.

  • Like drug addicts, the more we try to satisfy the little bosses, the more we end up craving.

  • The path to freedom is not self improvement, or somehow satisfying the self’s agenda,

  • but it’s a dropping of the self’s agenda altogether.

  • Some people fear that awakening their true nature will mean that they lose their individuality

  • and enjoyment of life.

  • Actually, the opposite is true; the unique individuation of the soul can only be expressed

  • when the conditioned self is overcome.

  • Because we remain asleep in the matrix most of us never find out what the soul actually

  • wants to express.

  • The path to Samadhi involves meditation, which is both observing the conditioned self; that

  • which changes, and realizing your true nature; that which does not change.

  • When you come to your still point, the source of your being, then you await further instructions

  • without any insistence on how your outer world has to change.

  • Not my will, but higher will be done.

  • If the mind only tries to change the outer world to conform with some idea of what you

  • think the path should be, it is like trying to change the image in a mirror by manipulating

  • the reflection.

  • To make the image in a mirror smile you obviously can’t manipulate the reflection, you have

  • to realize the you that is the authentic source of the reflection.

  • Once you realize the authentic self, it doesn’t mean that anything on the outside necessarily

  • needs to change.

  • What changes is the conscious, intelligent, inner energy or prana which is freed from

  • conditioned patterns and becomes available to be directed by the soul.

  • You can only become aware of the soul’s purpose when you are able to watch the conditioned

  • self and its endless pursuits, and let them go.

  • In Greek mythology, it was said that the gods condemned Sisyphus to repeat a meaningless

  • task for all eternity.

  • His task was to endlessly push a boulder up a mountain, only to have it roll down again.

  • The

  • French existentialist and Nobel Prize winning author, Albert Camus, saw the situation of

  • Sisyphus as a metaphor for humanity.

  • He asked the question, ‘How can we find meaning in this absurd existence?’.

  • As humans we are toiling endlessly, building for a tomorrow that never arrives, and then

  • we die.

  • If we truly realize this truth then we will either go mad if we are identified with our

  • egoic personas, or we will awaken and become free.

  • We can never succeed in the outer struggle, because it is just a reflection of our inner

  • world.

  • The cosmic joke, the absurdity of the situation becomes clear when there is a complete and

  • utter failure of the egoic self to awaken through its futile pursuits.

  • In Zen there is a saying, “Before enlightenment chop wood, carry water.

  • After enlightenment chop wood, carry water”.

  • Before enlightenment one must roll the ball up the hill, after enlightenment one must

  • also roll the ball up the hill.

  • What has changed?

  • The inner resistance to what is.

  • The struggle has been dropped, or rather the one who struggles has been realized to be

  • illusory.

  • The individual will or individual mind and divine will, or higher mind, are aligned.

  • Samadhi is ultimately a dropping of all inner resistance - to all changing phenomena, without

  • exception.

  • The one who is able to realize inner peace, irrespective of circumstance has attained

  • true Samadhi.