Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Let me start off with a story. Three men: a project manager, a software engineer,

  • and a Marketing manager are helping out on a project. About midweek they decide to walk

  • to downtown during their lunch hour. Halfway up the downtown, they stumbled upon a lamp.

  • As they rub the lamp a genie appears and says "Normally I would grant you three wishes,

  • but since there are three of you, I will grant you each one wish."

  • The marketing manager went first. "I would like to spend the rest of my life living in

  • a huge house in Hawaii with no money worries." The genie granted him his wish and sent him

  • on off to Hawaii. The software engineer went next. "I would

  • like to spend the rest of my life living on a huge yacht cruising the Mediterranean with

  • no money worries." The genie granted him his wish and sent him off to the Mediterranean.

  • Last, but not least, it was the project manager's turn. "And what would your wish be?" asked

  • the genie. "I want them both back for my meeting after lunch" replied the project manager.

  • As a project manager, you will be able to relate to this story

  • Let’s start off with some background on Project Management terminology, history and

  • responsibilities After listing to the lecture you should

  • be able to - Distinguish Project Mgmt from Operations

  • & Product Management - Know the history of Project Management

  • - Understand Role and Responsibilities the project manager, and know

  • - What does it take to be successful as a project manager.

  • * Let's go over project management terminology. * What is a project?

  • * A project temporary group activity designed to produce a unique product, service or goal.

  • * Temporary means that it has a defined beginning and end in time.

  • * Unique means a project is different from repetitive operations.

  • * Projects typically have a defined, narrow scope focusing on developing and implementing

  • new processes or systems * Operations or Business As Usual (BAU) focuses

  • on executing an existing, repetitive processes, e.g. producing client reports.

  • However, many projects are handed over to Operations or Support teams at the end of

  • the project. E.g. As a project manager, you could design

  • and supervise a project to develop a CRM system or Customer Service process

  • Once the product or process is going live the project manager would hand it over to

  • Operations and Support teams. PM and Operations/Support roles sometimes

  • get comingled where IT Project Managers are being asked to perform technical support roles.

  • This often happens when a project manager fails properly close out the project in terms

  • of hand-over the project to support teams.

  • Project management is the process of planning and controlling resources to achieve specific

  • goals. E.g. develop and implement a new web application

  • Improve quality and turn-around time of customer service inquiries

  • As mentioned, Project management is different from Operations Management

  • Projects typically have a defined, narrow scope and are typically short-term while Operations

  • tending to be ongoing endeavours Operations focuses on managing existing

  • processes, e.g. producing client or internal reports or documents.

  • Project management is also different from Product Management

  • You can think of Product managers are being project managers with heavy emphasis on the

  • marketing side. Project management focuses onwhen”.

  • E.g. when does the milestone get completed? Product management focuses: “why”. Why

  • will this feature help to improve user customer satisfaction or user acquisition?

  • In some organizations the roles of Project Mgmt and Product Mgmt are sometimes performed

  • by the one person, frequently in startup environments.

  • Let's take a brief look at evolution of

  • project management. Until 19th century architects or typically

  • engineers managed projects. In the 50s that organizations started to

  • use structured methods for projects. The forefathers of project management are

  • Henry Gantt and Henri Fayol. Gantt is famous for his use of the Gantt

  • chart as a project management tool Fayol for his creation of the five management

  • functions that form the foundation of the project management body of knowledge.

  • The 1950s marked the beginning of the modern project management era.

  • In the 1950s, two mathematical scheduling models were developed.

  • The "Critical Path Method" (CPM) The "Program Evaluation and Review Technique"

  • or PERT These mathematical techniques quickly spread

  • into many organizations.

  • In 1956, the American Association of Cost Engineers (AACE) was founded by practitioners

  • of project management.

  • The AACE continued its pioneering work and in 2006 released the first integrated process

  • model for portfolio, program and project management.

  • In 1967, the International Project Management Association (IPMA) was founded in Europe.

  • IPMA has federal structure and now includes member associations on every continent.

  • In 1969, the Project Management Institute (PMI) was founded.

  • PMI publishes the Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide)

  • PMI also offers serveral certifications such as PMP Certification.

  • So, Project management evolved as a combination of business administration and engineering.

  • Therefore, to be successful as a project manager you need to business- and tech savvy.

  • So that does a Project Manager? Let's talk about the role and responsibilities

  • of a project manager. In a nutshell, a project manager is responsible

  • planning, executing and closing a project. He is responsible for accomplishing the

  • agreed project goals with the agreed time, budget and scope.

  • Key activities of project manager include * defining clear and attainable project objectives,

  • documenting a project charter that include the issues to resolved, project goals, scope,

  • team, timeline, KPIs

  • Project managers have to manage the triple constraint for projects, which is cost, time,

  • and scope. They also the primary point of contact for project issues and risks.

  • People frequently askWhat does it take to be successful as a project manager?”

  • #1: You must be a great communicator It is said that more than 50% of a project

  • manager’s time is spent in some aspect of communication. This includes

  • meetings, status reporting, e­mails, phone calls, coordinating, talking to people, and

  • completing documentation. Some studies have shown that verbal and

  • written communication takes up 80% of the job.

  • If you are not an effective communicator (and you don’t care to be), don’t go down

  • this path.

  • #2: You must be a team player and work well with people

  • If you prefer to stay in your office and focus on your own work, you probably don’t

  • have the collaborative ability to be a good project manager.

  • Project managers need to spend a lot of time with clients, stakeholders, and team

  • members.

  • #3: You have to balance being detail-oriented and never lose sight of strategic goals of

  • the business and the big picture that may include corporate politics.

  • You have to be detailed oriented when reviewing scheduled , requirements or issues and think

  • big picture in terms of strategic business objectives, customer requirements and office

  • politics.

  • #4: You like to manage people You don’t have much of a project if youre

  • the only resource. If you want to be a good project manager,

  • you need to be able to manage people. You will not have 100% responsibility for

  • people, but you will need to show leadership, hold them accountable, manage conflict, etc..

  • #5: You like to follow processes No one wants to be a slave of processes.

  • But you need good processes to be effective as your projects.

  • #6: You like to document things Many aspects of project management require

  • some documentation, including status reporting, communication plans, scope changes, and Project

  • Charters.

  • #7: You like to plan When a client gives you a project, what

  • is your first inclination? If your first thought is to get a team together

  • to start executing the work, you probably don’t have a project management mindset.

  • #8: You don't like to be an order taker If you think your job is to take orders

  • from the customer and execute them, you may not be a good project manager.

  • Project managers need to provide value on a project, including pushing back when the

  • client is asking for things that are not right. If the client raises a request that is out

  • of scope, you also need to invoke the scope change management process.

  • #9: You are organized People who have poor personal organization

  • skills and techniques usually do not make good project managers.

  • If youre going to manage multiple people over a period of time, you need to be well

  • organized to make sure that everyone is doing what he or she needs to do as efficiently

  • as possible.

  • #10: You feel that project management is value-adding and not administrativeoverhead

  • No one can feel good about their job if they think the work they perform is not value­

  • added. Good project managers understand the value of their work, and they understand their

  • work will result in a project coming in on time and on budget with a good experience

  • for the client and the project team. If you think the work associated with project management

  • is overhead and non value ­added, youre probably not the right person to be a project

  • manager yourself.

  • Conclusion Let’s review what we covered.

  • A project temporary group activity designed to produce a unique product, service or goal.

  • Project management is different from Operations Management and from Product Management

  • Project management evolved in the 1950s as a combination of business administration

  • and engineering Project managers have to manage the triple

  • constraint for projects, which is cost, time, and scope. They also the primary point of

  • contact for project issues and risks. To be successful as a project manager you

  • need to business- and tech savvy. To be successful project manager you also

  • have to be a great communicator, a team player and balance attention to technical details

  • as well big picture thinking which includes knowledge of business strategy and organizational

  • politics.

Let me start off with a story. Three men: a project manager, a software engineer,

Subtitles and vocabulary

Click the word to look it up Click the word to find further inforamtion about it

B1 project project management project manager management manager scope

Project Management Tutorial: Introduction to Project Management

  • 198 34
    BearBear San posted on 2016/08/03
Video vocabulary