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  • Oh, no.

  • >> The best part about being a girl is making

  • sure I don't have to do any of this.

  • [LAUGH] I can't even watch that.

  • >> It's about the community,

  • you can't have them walk by.

  • >> Fat Pasha, Toronto, Canada,.

  • >> My name is Anthony Rose, and

  • I own Rose and Son's Big Grill and

  • Fat Pasha, all on Two Point Street in Toronto.

  • Fat Pasha is like a combination of

  • Middle Eastern, Israeli and Jewish food.

  • It's just happened really well and

  • just came together quickly,

  • which is perfect.

  • It is that kinda Eastern European influence with

  • the old school Israeli, as well, and

  • that's what we've created here but in a very

  • simple kinda back country cottage-y type of feel.

  • >> Hands please.

  • >> Right now I'm gonna put

  • together a salad team platter.

  • >> We have a little it of carraway cabbage slaw.

  • We have a spicy Moroccan style carrot salad.

  • We got some dilled cucumbers,

  • some beet roots and labane,

  • topped with a little bit of dried oregano.

  • We got some heavily charred eggplant mixed up

  • with some tahina.

  • Some garlic burst tomatoes and what not.

  • Some rahini tabouli.

  • So then we finish this because you've got to

  • put olive oil everywhere.

  • See that?

  • It's super healthy.

  • Most of it's raw.

  • Like, if it's cooked at all,

  • it's cooked in vinegar.

  • You know, it's just a beautiful,

  • fresh way to start your meal.

  • [SOUND].

  • >> The first time I met Anthony was at

  • the Drake Hotel, and he kind of opened my eyes to

  • things should just be good, you know?

  • And it was the first chef I'd ever worked for

  • that had really showed me that food can be good.

  • We were working with the best products.

  • The same products we worked with at

  • every restaurant,

  • every good restaurant in the city but we didn't

  • have to make them fussy and fruffy and whatever.

  • It was just good,

  • bold food on a fucking plate, right?

  • [MUSIC]

  • We're gonna do a whole head of

  • roasted cauliflower.

  • We give them a parboil,

  • then we cut them open, just so we can

  • get the heat inside a little bit better.

  • We pre-roast them.

  • So we just give a little extra oil, kind of

  • get that sterilization going a little bit more.

  • >> I kind of thought Anthony was a bit insane,

  • when he came to me and like,

  • we were hashing out the original menu together.

  • It's like oh, we're going to do a whole head of

  • cauliflower and I was like,

  • I'm gonna come in here tomorrow with like 15

  • ideas of how we can serve cauliflower.

  • So I did and it took about five,

  • six, seven, eight, I don't know,

  • 25 tries to actually nail that dish down.

  • So now that we've pulled it out, we've go

  • a good amount of that carmelization on there,

  • which is tasty and also through the magic of

  • television slipped some halloumi cheese in there.

  • >> Start it out with some of our tahina dressing,

  • some of our schkug.

  • Schkug's like an herby hot sauce.

  • A little bit of pomegranate, some of

  • that sweetness, tartness, a little extra crunch and

  • now we finish it off with some pine nuts.

  • The cauliflower is like absolutely our

  • signature dish.

  • Everybody orders it.

  • That's our roasted cauliflower dish.

  • It's a cool dish and it's gorgeous at

  • the table because it comes whole and

  • it's got a knife in it and you can share it.

  • Originally, when we opened up,

  • we were just serving a whole cauliflower but

  • people weren't eating the whole thing, so

  • now we serve a half cauliflower, as well.

  • >> I go through like three cases of

  • cauliflower a day.

  • It's like, 36 eggs.

  • Doesn't even make sense.

  • >> Kev's a smart guy.

  • I know Kev for years.

  • He worked for me as a cook and

  • a sous chef at the Drake Hotel.

  • You know, he's such a great leader and

  • he's created such amazing community there.

  • Yeah, so it's fantastic.

  • [MUSIC]

  • >> So we're gonna do our chopped liver dish.

  • It's loosely, loosely based on a restaurant in

  • New York called Sammy's Romanian.

  • >> Sammy's is old school Romanian steak house,

  • lower east side.

  • We asked him, like, can we do this in Toronto?

  • Absolutely.

  • >> So we have the chopped chicken liver.

  • We have some grated radish.

  • We have some hard boiled egg,

  • some caramelized onion, and

  • a whole shit ton of gribenes, which is like,

  • crispy chicken skins.

  • >> Nice.

  • >> And the dressing,

  • of course, we got the schmaltz.

  • A bunch of chicken fat.

  • Oh. It comes a bit of

  • that grilled challah bread.

  • Eat here every day and you will live forever.

  • I'm pretty sure it's a thing.

  • Yeah, the guy in the Globe Mail had

  • a borderline sexual experience with it

  • the other week, so.

  • Here you go, guys.

  • Put that in the middle for you.

  • Help yourselves.

  • You got a little bit of

  • beetroot horseradish on the side, right?

  • So a little acidity, a little spice is gonna cut

  • right through all that fatty goodness for you.

  • It's fatty, it's rich, it's kinda a little bit

  • opposite of everything else that we

  • do because it is so animal fatty and rich.

  • I mean we have both ends of the spectrum in the

  • restaurant, we have like vegetables and fresh, and

  • this then, we have this chopped liver dish.

  • >> And that's where a lot of the food comes from

  • and some of the feeling that we're trying to get.

  • Not only at Fat Pasha but in all the restaurants.

  • >> This is where we are and

  • hopefully, this is where we keep going.

  • Just forward and better, and more veggie and yeah,

  • just take over the Dupont first, and then the city.

  • [MUSIC]

  • [MUSIC]

  • After we were done making dinner for everybody, we

  • finally got a chance to all go out together which

  • is something we haven't had the chance to do yet.

  • All right, have a good night guys.

  • I'll see you later at the big grill.

  • Whew, we're going to Rose and Sons.

  • We gotta pick up Chris Sandy Sanders,

  • he's like the the funniest guy on

  • the face of the planet and he's my boss.

  • He's the father of Rose and Sons.

  • You know, he's my daddy.

  • All right.

  • >> This is going to be really good.

  • >> We're going to

  • Rodney's Oyster House right now.

  • It's down on King Street.

  • Rodney's is one of my

  • favorite restaurants in town,

  • [MUSIC]

  • They got an amazing selection of oysters,

  • gorgeous lobster, crab.

  • Love oysters but I also love that oyster house

  • feeling, it's good food, it's fantastic people

  • with a very cool kinda East Coast vibe.

  • [MUSIC]

  • Rodney is like a legend in the city, and

  • his kids now run the joint.

  • >> My name is Aemon Clark

  • from Rodney's Oyster House.

  • Thirty years ago, my father came to Toronto.

  • What happened is his father would send him

  • oysters on the back of a potato truck from

  • PEI where he's from and he would then give

  • these oysters out to people around the city.

  • Eventually, he started up Rodney's Oyster House.

  • To see them shuck oysters and to see them kind of,

  • like that old school mentality,

  • of even the food,

  • like they're not trying to reinvent the wheel.

  • They're just making good food.

  • >> It's the oyster first,

  • then it's the customer and

  • then we worry about everything else after,

  • you know?

  • All right, guys, a couple dozen oysters here.

  • So we did a little selection of

  • East Coast oysters.

  • That's Onset Bay, Buzzards Bay,

  • Massachusetts, tray raised oysters, pretty

  • typical kind of oyster that comes out of there.

  • Three and a half inches long.

  • Queen is our middle grade.

  • Prince, queen, and kings, small, medium and large.

  • >> Oh, look at the crab.

  • >> So a nice crab, two and a half pound.

  • Squeeze his belly but

  • don't squeeze it too hard.

  • Don't pull his tail out.

  • [LAUGH] >> Don't wanna hurt him.

  • >> [CROSSTALK].

  • >> Guys, good health, to Rodney's.

  • To Rodney's, to the holy trinity.

  • It has Maine tartar sauce and

  • just a little panko crust.

  • >> Oh.

  • >> So fucking good, man.

  • >> Oh. Oh. >> Isn't that good?

  • >> They're not too salty either.

  • >> The mussels were so good and Sandy showed us

  • that thing with the other mussel shell.

  • >> If it extends with a tongue,

  • you have to eat it.

  • So you go in.

  • You pick up your mussel, and you eat it.

  • You gotta stack the mussel shells like so.

  • Keep it fucking super neat.

  • >> I've never seen that before.

  • >> Growing up, actually, my parents would carry

  • a whole purse of these with them just for

  • me because I would get so dirty all the time.

  • >> [CROSSTALK] [LAUGH] A little bit of

  • this action.

  • [CROSSTALK].

  • >> I've been coming forever and ever and

  • ever, and I fucking love it.

  • [MUSIC]

  • [LAUGH] [COUGH] [LAUGH].

  • >> It went right down my throat.

  • >> That's disgusting.

  • [NOISE] [LAUGH] Did somebody just fart?

  • >> Yeah. >> Jesus christ.

  • >> Actually at one point, I farted.

  • So that was very, very, very awkward.

  • Now let's talk about it.

  • It was very involuntary.

  • I didn't even feel it coming.

  • You can ask my wife.

  • It's a phenomenon.

  • >> You know, I came out here expecting a very,

  • very refined type of eating.

  • Cardigan search.

  • >> [LAUGH]. >> I love Rodney's.

  • We'll always

  • go there.

  • [MUSIC]

  • >> Sounds good.

  • >> Yeah. >> [LAUGH].

  • >> Hello there.

  • >> Oh, yeah.

  • Hello there.

  • All right, where are we going?

  • Did you say Northwood?

  • >> This is my local.

  • It's just like a bar in my hood