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  • Hello, Iím Michael Alvarez, regional manager for CAL/OSHA consultation; lets talk about

  • scaffold safety. It is estimated that 2.3 million American construction workers work

  • on scaffolds, that is about 65 percent of the construction industry. Did you know that

  • 4500 injuries and 50 deaths involve scaffold accidents each year? Most of these injuries

  • involved falls and struck-bys. Preventing is education, therefore you must learn how

  • to protect yourself through safety training. The training must include best practices and

  • equipment safety, who should inspect scaffolds, and what should you look for. This video is

  • not a comprehensive safety program; for clarification and specific information for your job site,

  • please consult with your supervisor. Thank you.

  • Scaffolding provides work areas large enough to hold workers, necessary supplies and equipment.

  • The purpose of this training is to discuss safe work behaviors on elevated work surfaces.

  • We will review some of the basic knowledge that you should have before working on scaffolds.

  • Inexperienced employees are often most vulnerable to developing risky behaviors using scaffolds

  • and need specific safety training at the beginning of their employment. This training DVD is

  • set up in chapters to allow quick access to specific subjects. You have the option to

  • include or exclude chapters as needed for customizing your training sessionís needs.

  • The chapters are; one, daily onsite inspection of scaffolding, two, fall hazards, three,

  • using designated access areas for egress onto and off scaffolding, four, rolling scaffolds,

  • five, personal protective equipment, six, conclusion.

  • Each individual worker needs to be aware of all safety requirements for their job. Scaffolds

  • should be inspected continuously by those using the scaffold. The industry best practice

  • is that scaffolds be inspected for safe condition before use or shift, and CAL/OSHA construction

  • safety order 1644C1 states that all manufacturersí instruction shall be followed. Scaffolding

  • erected on a construction site is used by many trades and subcontractors, this multi-user

  • process often leads to conditions of defective scaffolding, therefore the responsibility

  • for safety on the work-site is up to you.

  • Hi, Iím Tom Falkenstein, Iím with the CAL/OSHA consultation services office out of Oakland.

  • A lot of my clients are construction contractors, many of whom use scaffolding, so scaffolding

  • is something that I look at quite often on a construction worksite. Some of the first

  • things that I look for when I walk up to a scaffold is I look to see, is it plum and

  • square. The easiest way to check to see if itís plum, buildings are built straight up

  • and down, if the scaffold is not parallel to the building, itís a pretty good idea

  • that itís not plum; have the braces kept the scaffold square and the frame square to

  • each other, is it level, are the base plates and legs set in a manner to keep the scaffold

  • flat and level and the work platform level for the workers to be on. The

  • The next thingll check is to see what kind of condition the scaffold frames are

  • actually in; are they cracked, are they dented, are they twisted, are they bent. If the scaffold

  • has any kind of damage to the frame you canít use it because it affects the integrity of

  • the structure itself and with a weakened structure it could collapse, and if people are on it

  • when it collapses, weíre going to have people hurt. The frames have also got to be assembled

  • properly; the pins need to hold the tubes and the frames in place, there need to be

  • pins between the tubes and the frames, and if thereís a potential for the scaffold to

  • be bumped or upset then those pins need to be actually connected to the legs

  • physically so that the scaffold canít be upset and collapse. The next thing to look

  • at are the cross bracings, are they properly attached, they need to be attached to the

  • pins in the scaffold frame panel and not simply wired to the scaffold frames themselves. Another

  • thing that must be installed on a scaffold are guardrails, the guardrails will be 42

  • to 45 inches above the work platform for the top rail with an intermediate railing, or

  • mid-rail, half way between the two. Planking is another element that you need to look at,

  • that is your work platform; if you have a plank that is broken, cracked, split or otherwise

  • damaged, that can be hazardous to work on. Do not use them for work platforms behind

  • you to do your jobs. The scaffold planking has got to be covering

  • the space between the uprights on the panels, there can be no more than one inch between

  • the scaffold planks themselves, and at the back of the scaffold it can be no more than

  • ten inches of gap between the last scaffold and the guardrail. If thereís room to put

  • a plank you should add another plank to the scaffold, all work platforms have got to be

  • at least 20 inches in width, but all scaffolds must be fully planked between the uprights.

  • Scaffold planking at the corners must also be properly installed; scaffold planking must

  • overlap the work platform that itís perpendicular to completely; the reason for this is, the

  • scaffold planking that itís overlapping will bear the full load of the crossing scaffold

  • planks instead of a single plank trying to bear the full load. This will affect the structure

  • and the safety for the individuals working on the platform. As an example of the

  • scaffold planking at the corners, you can see this is what it should look like. Once

  • the scaffoldís been erected and the planking and guardrail in place, never remove any of

  • the components of the scaffold. Scaffolds are designed and intended to support not only

  • themselves but four times the intended workload; any modifications to the scaffold structure

  • are going to weaken it, and as a result youíre going to end up with a potential collapse

  • and injured or killed employees. To climb onto a scaffold never use the diagonal

  • bracing or any of the support members of the frame panels; climbing on the frames is not

  • advised simply because its bad end holds and bad footholds. A ladder, a stairwell or stairway

  • or some of the trap door systems that they now have for scaffold access are the only

  • proper methods to be used to access your scaffold. Any time a scaffold has people working below

  • it or passing underneath the scaffold, toe boards are required be fitted at the work

  • platform in those areas; toe boards must be at least four inches in height and can be

  • no more than a quarter inch above the plank that theyíre resting on. The purpose of toe

  • boards is to keep debris, material, supplies and whatever from being kicked off of the

  • work platform onto employees working below. If youíre in a work situation where youíre

  • required to drop things from the scaffold planking or structure itself, you need to

  • barricade the area that youíll be dropping the material onto, post a spotter, put up

  • warning signs, otherwise take measures to keep people out of that area. Other measures

  • to prevent employees from being struck by falling objects, which are commonly referred

  • to as struck-bys would be to provide debris nets, mesh screens or covers that will go

  • between the guardrails and the toe board to keep debris from going over the side and materials

  • from falling over the side.

  • When working on scaffolds, preventing falls must always be on your mind. Donít use a

  • scaffold if itís wet or slippery, and never jump or run on a scaffold. Falls are by far

  • the most frequent cause of accidents while working on scaffolds; they also cause the

  • most severe injuries, and in many cases death. A body in freefall covers distance very quickly;

  • a person falls four feet in half a second, in one second 15 feet, in two seconds 64 feet.

  • The impact of even a four foot fall can cause serious injury. If your job site requires

  • the use of a personal fall arrest system, your supervisor will give you specific training

  • for the proper use of this equipment.

  • When we talk about fall protection and scaffolding, we always think of the acronym or the ABC

  • and D of fall protection, and if we can remember that weíre going to be a lot safer. A is

  • for the anchorage point, B is for the body harness, C is for the connectors and D is

  • for the de-accelerating devices, which is going to limit our impact. First thing weíre

  • going to talk about is A the anchorage point, and anchorage point is critical and generally

  • the anchorage point is listed as a five thousand pound anchorage point. If you have a scaffold

  • on a jobsite, sometimes we can anchor to a scaffold, but you need to check on your jobsite,

  • and thatís jobsite specific, to make sure that the anchorage point is approved by a

  • qualified person. For instance, we cannot anchorage to an aluminum rolling scaffold

  • at any place, but a lot of the steel jobsite scaffold that weíre on, weíre able to anchor

  • to. The body harness has to reduce the impact

  • load on the body, and we have to make sure that our body harnesses are appropriate for

  • the job weíre doing and that theyíve been properly inspected. We need to look at all

  • of those things before we ever put a harness on. Right hereís my cross-chest harness.

  • Basically the only place I can attach to this harness is the back D ring here on your back.

  • The item that goes to that would be your de-accelerating device, your lanyard, something like that.

  • Itís important that when you put your harness on itís property adjusted, it needs to fit

  • across ñ the sub-pelvic strap needs to fit across the bottom of the pelvis and the butt

  • here and it has to be on there nice and secure, we donít want this so tight that it cuts

  • off the blood flow, but we donít want it on so loose that itís going to create a hazard

  • to us when and if we fall. When you put your harness on itís absolutely

  • important that you inspect your harness every time, thatís not the safety officerís job,

  • thatís your job, and you put your body harness on, you need to inspect it. This is a pretty

  • good body harness but as I inspected my body harness I saw on the sub pelvic strap a cut

  • in that sub-pelvic strap, that was enough to take this body harness out of service.

  • But never ever put a body harness on again when you have things like this in your pocket;

  • keys, keys, knives, flashlights, those kinds of things in your pocket go exactly underneath

  • the leg strap of your body harness. If you are to fall and this key decides to puncture

  • your femoral artery, youíre going to be in big trouble. Itís very easy to clean your

  • pockets out, put them in the toolbox, put them somewhere, but get them out of your pockets

  • because thatís an accident waiting to happen. Next thing weíre going to go to is the third

  • or the C portion of personal fall arrest; we need a connector. Excuse me, the connector

  • is all often referred to a carabiner or a hook. These are all things that connect you

  • to an anchorage point. When youíre using connectors you have to have a double-locking

  • self-closing connector; why is a double-acting connector so critical, I took this off of

  • a job site, this is a six foot lanyard with a single acting hook on this; this is a problem

  • that we see and itís called rollout, and thatís how easily this can disconnect. We

  • use this or have it hooked up to a carabiner, this carabiner we can actually roll right

  • out of this device and it can come right apart, so itís absolutely critical that we have

  • a double-locking hook. The fourth part, or the D is the de-accelerating

  • device; the de-accelerating device is usually found in a six foot lanyard, something like

  • this, this lanyard could also be a four foot lanyard. Now what a de-accelerating device

  • does is it has a shock pack built in, whether itís enclosed with cloth, whether itís enclosed

  • with a shrink-wrapped pack, this package has 42 inches of material that, in a fall, will

  • slow your acceleration so that we donít have an impact force at the end of the fall, this

  • is why we call this a de-accelerating pack. This is the part that limits our impact load

  • now, according to OSHA, 18 hundred pounds. Anchorage points; body

  • harnesses, connectors and de-accelerating devices, critical things to remember; job

  • site specific on all of your equipment, make sure that theyíre always inspected before

  • you put them on. Make sure that a certified or a qualified individual approves the anchorage

  • point, if youíre not sure, make sure, ask somebody that can give you an affirmative

  • on a proper anchorage point. All of these things are critical and all of these are going

  • to help you get home to the family that you love and care about at the end of each day.

Hello, Iím Michael Alvarez, regional manager for CAL/OSHA consultation; lets talk about

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B2 US scaffold itís anchorage harness scaffolding weíre

Scaffolding Safety English Pt. 1

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    kuoyumei posted on 2015/06/28
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