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  • You wanna give us a little tune?

  • And get your, get your prayer ready?

  • >> Toby Rodriguez, Lache Pas Boucherie. We decided

  • to do a true community boucherie.

  • None of y'all really wanna be in

  • the receiving end of the bullet.

  • It's the butchering of a hog.

  • When we shoot the pig, we're gonna go ahead and,

  • like, right away after it's shot,

  • it gets stunned.

  • We're gonna pull it to the edge of

  • the it's gonna, should be right here already.

  • >> Yeah.

  • >> Cuz I'm gonna put feed for it.

  • >> In a traditional boucherie,

  • we cook things such as backbone stew,

  • we make smoked sausage,

  • hog head cheese to name a few.

  • If it flops around too much, it,

  • like it hurts itself.

  • It gets bruised up and cut up.

  • So, we actually hold it down while I go ahead and

  • bleed it out.

  • It's comfort, yeah, comfort him as,

  • as much as possible.

  • >> Kill them, butcher them, and

  • made a little bit of boudin with it.

  • [MUSIC]

  • Muchies presents.

  • Cajun Boudin.

  • Get some boudin.

  • >> Do it.

  • >> Simple recipe, the pork,

  • the onions, the rice cake and cajun seasoning and

  • stuff it in a natural hull casing.

  • It's not really complicated about

  • the boudin process you know.

  • >> Boudin was something that was

  • just always there when we were growing up.

  • Like people would think of going and

  • getting a box of doughnuts,

  • we'd go get a box of boudin.

  • >> When I was driving truck for

  • the Parish and things,

  • we would stop at a store in the morning and

  • get a neck of boudin with some milk.

  • And we'd eat it for breakfast.

  • >> Perfect thing to do as a family.

  • Get boudin.

  • Anytime I'm hung over.

  • >> Boudin. >> Boudin.

  • [LAUGH].

  • You go to someone's house, and

  • instead of bringing a bottle of wine,

  • you bring a box of boudin.

  • It's just always there, you're always having it.

  • I mean, I still eat it every day.

  • >> It sounds good, it tastes good,

  • it smells good, and it's pretty much everywhere.

  • [MUSIC]

  • Johnson's Boucaniere, Lafayette, LA.

  • >> Two pounds of boudin, Danny.

  • Cut in half.

  • [SOUND] Wallace Johnson, Johnson's Boucaniere.

  • >> My name is Wallace Johnson,

  • I work at the Boucaniere.

  • >> My name is Lori Walls, I'm his daughter.

  • I'm the owner of Johnson's Boucaniere.

  • We do sausage, the smoked meats,

  • the tasso, beef jerky, and then boudin.

  • >> Back in the old days

  • when the farmers would kill a hog.

  • They would make make little bit of boudin to

  • use up everything.

  • Cuz there was no

  • refrigeration at the time.

  • It was a way of not wasting any of the meats.

  • They would cook the liver and then boil some meat

  • and, and they'd get some greens in, and some rice.

  • They would take the entrails from the hog and

  • clean them out and wash them good and

  • then stuff the, the mixture into the casing.

  • It's all fully cooked except for the casing.

  • You can simmer it, you can grill it,

  • you can steam it.

  • >> I wouldn't say

  • it's considered extremely attractive.

  • >> There was no boudin made commercially until

  • my daddy started it in 1948.

  • And my daddy decided he was going to start

  • making boudin to sell in the grocery store.

  • That's what he did, he and my sister.

  • That's lagniappe (extra).

  • >> Ooh, lord.

  • We used to be the only one, but

  • now they've got hundreds.

  • [LAUGH] Every, every gas station you go to in

  • Louisiana sells boudin.

  • [MUSIC]

  • Floyd Poche, Poche's Market and Restaurant.

  • I'm Floyd Poche the owner of Poche's Market and

  • Restaurant.

  • It's been in business since 1976, Diane had it

  • before me since 1962. We do a lot of boudin,

  • cracklin, andouille sausage, tasso and

  • a lot of specialty meats. You

  • know like stuffed pork roast, you know, and all

  • this famous Cajun foods. We make about 5 to 6,000

  • pounds a week of boudin. And we put porked liver

  • in our, our boudin and a lot of the younger people

  • don't like liver quite as much as it used to

  • be in the old days.

  • So we cut off all the liver a little bit more.

  • And replace it with a bit more meat and stuff.

  • >> Whenever I was a kid, boudin was the scraps.

  • Roddie Romero, Cajun musician. It was

  • the things that we weren't going to be

  • eating or like had to be eaten fresh.

  • And we made boudin out of it.

  • And nowadays they're breaking the whole

  • shoulder down.

  • >> Yeah. >> For for boudin.

  • The stuff that people used to

  • associate with boudin.

  • Like all the scraps and

  • the nasty parts of the pig.

  • >> Yeah. >> I think there's a

  • thing going on right now where they're no longer-

  • Tony Davoren, Lache Pas Boucherie.

  • The nasty parts.

  • They're the delicious parts, you know.

  • >> Because of Bizarre Foods, and, and Bourdain,

  • and all these guys that have gone in and

  • shown that hey it's cool.

  • It's cool to eat some strange stuff.

  • It's actually not that strange and

  • it's delicious as a delicacy.

  • >> It's not even that it's cool.

  • It's the best part.

  • >> It's the best part.

  • [MUSIC]

  • Boudin is native I feel to our area.

  • Much like the po' boy's native to New Orleans.

  • I don't know of any boudin in New Orleans.

  • Maybe you might find a link or

  • two here are there.

  • But not in the same capacity as over here.

  • [MUSIC]

  • Cochon, New Orleans, LA. Donald Link,

  • Chef/Owner, Cochon.

  • >> Believe it or

  • not, it's hard to find boudin in New Orleans.

  • I mean, we serve it at Cochon Butcher and

  • it's probably the only place I

  • can think of that you can get hot boudin.

  • Which is strange cause we're so close to it.

  • [MUSIC]

  • The ingredients in boudin has always been pork and

  • some liver.

  • My ratio is about a quarter.

  • What we do is just have enough in it to where you

  • don't really know its in there.

  • But it supplies the, the richness and

  • the depth of flavor that you want.

  • Without tasting like old liver.

  • Here's the juice from the cooking.

  • It's like risotto.

  • You know, you have to stir it to get it creamy.

  • We're not just blending it here.

  • We're actually trying to break the starch out of

  • the rice to give it that certain texture.

  • It's kinda based on, you know, all the things I

  • liked about the different boudins that I've had.

  • One of the interesting thing about boudin,

  • same ingredients and

  • everything is so different.

  • >> Definitely more meat than rice.

  • >> Mm-hm. >> I can

  • barely get the rice at all.

  • >> I know. >> I like the amount of

  • vegetables it had.

  • >> I like the green onions.

  • >> Yeah. >> It's definitely got

  • some liver to it.

  • >> It's very dry.

  • They do not grind their meat.

  • I think they shred their meat.

  • >> It's really, you know,

  • everyone has their favorite spot.

  • >> People are committed and

  • religious about their favorite boudin.

  • They, they've got their favorite boudin and

  • nothing is better than that.

  • That's their boudin,

  • you're not gonna talk them into anything else.

  • Doesn't matter what you say,

  • doesn't matter what you put on the table.

  • I aint sa, I, I, you know,

  • I haven't seen people fight over boudin yet.

  • >> [LAUGH] It's coming close.

  • >> It wasn't the abundance of

  • specialty meat shops that exist now.

  • Now, people go, want boudin and

  • they go to a specialty meat store

  • that specializes mainly in boudin and cracklin.

  • Well as a kid you went to an actual butcher shop or

  • your grocery store which had

  • a meat department in there.

  • And, like,

  • boudin was usually made in those departments.

  • [MUSIC]

  • >> Five links of boudin please.

  • I know, but we got sushi.

  • Go ahead, brother.

  • Is that sushi for lovers?

  • When's the last time you saw

  • boudin served over a sushi counter?

  • [MUSIC]

  • Scott, LA.

  • The Best Stop, Scott, LA.

  • >> What we got?

  • >> Here we go.

  • >> It's, it's the ass end of the boudin.

  • >> [LAUGH]. >> And liver's

  • coming out of it.

  • Is the best part.

  • >> I mean, that always gets me excited.

  • The ass end of anything gets you excited.

  • >> The Best Stop is probably,

  • along with Porsay's, probably one of the first

  • places that built this reputation around boudin.

  • >> I wish blue man was here.

  • He'd tell you how many thousands of

  • pounds they would, they sell everyday.

  • I don't know the number but it's, it's amazing.

  • >> Oh, it's big money.

  • Like, like there are a few

  • different families that are funding.

  • Completely funded,

  • like Jack Christmas is all paid for by Boudin.

  • Purvis Morrison, Mayor of Scott, LA.

  • >> I never thought that I would see boudin become

  • a multi-million dollar industry.

  • Last year when we found that that year prior was

  • 1.5 million pounds of boudin sold in the city

  • of Scott.

  • Employees, about 80 employees that work in

  • the city of Scott because of the boudin industry.

  • So that was one of the biggest,

  • I guess, That we were able to use to influence

  • the legislature, to give us the opportunity to be

  • called the Boudin capital of the world.

  • Broussard was self proclaimed as

  • the Boudin capital of the world.

  • But there were no records of

  • anything that showed through legislation that

  • they went through the process to

  • become the Boudin capital of the world.

  • And we are the Boudin capital of the world.

  • [MUSIC]

  • Jenny's is

  • still the Boudin capital of the universe.

  • >> I mean Poches Bridges is probably the,

  • the king.

  • I don't