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  • Welcome to DIY Tryin.

  • Build something new.

  • I'm Patrick Norton.

  • I'm Michael Hand.

  • We were going to bring you the most amazing confluence

  • of aluminum gas welding and lemons today.

  • But that failed horribly.

  • Yes.

  • Yes, it did.

  • So instead, Arduinos.

  • Yay!

  • What's an Arduino?

  • So Arduino is a microcontroller that you

  • can program to do tons, infinite things.

  • It's a controller or a microcontroller.

  • There's, like, 32,000 variations of these,

  • from BASIC PIC Stamp through Arduino.

  • Some people use Raspberry Pi.

  • I'm thinking the cover of Make Magazine this month has

  • 300,000 different controllers inside of it.

  • I mean, a controller controls things, right?

  • Yeah, exactly.

  • So like I said, it's something that you

  • can program to do a whole range of things.

  • So in this case, we're going to show off

  • how to control high-powered applications,

  • or do high-powered applications, with

  • this little low-powered Arduino.

  • And what's crazy is by combining some kind of controller,

  • like the Arduino, and some software you can probably

  • download off the internet, probably

  • will have to download off the internet,

  • you can make things do things-- like automate

  • a dorm-room entertainment system,

  • or make sure some lights get turned on every time

  • your garage is opened, or that a song plays

  • every time your cat sits down on its bed.

  • It's just-- the limit is your imagination.

  • Exactly.

  • Controller boards, you can pick them up at Radio Shack now.

  • You got yours off of--

  • I got mine off of eBay, I think, for $12.

  • Because it's cheap and they all seem to work, in my experience.

  • This is good.

  • So what's with the Flying Spaghetti Monster

  • homage of wiring?

  • OK, so beyond the microcontroller,

  • we also have this relay board.

  • This is an eight-channel board, so that

  • means that we can power eight different things this way.

  • Well, you can turn eight different things on or off.

  • On or off, so a relay board is super old school,

  • in that it's just like a remote-controlled switch

  • that this is a physical switch that's switching on and off.

  • There's a chance every time you turn the headlights

  • on in your car, a relay is actually doing the switching.

  • I mean, these are basically-- as far

  • as electronics are concerned, this is Stone Age technology.

  • So these are cool, that it's looking for a 5-volt signal.

  • And when it gets that 5-volt signal, it turns on.

  • And by turning on, I mean it closes the connection,

  • and then closes the loop.

  • Yeah, you send voltage in this end.

  • It does magic.

  • It closes the switch at this end.

  • And I love reading the specs-- 10 amps, 250 volts AC, 10 amps,

  • 30 volts DC.

  • That means 120 volts, 220 volts, as long

  • as it's not higher than 10 amps, 30 volts DC, as long

  • as it's not higher than 10 amps-- anything

  • up to that maximum.

  • That's really awesome.

  • That's a lot of juice to work with.

  • Yes.

  • So the way I have this set up is that I

  • have a ground going to the relay switch.

  • And then I have pins 2 to 9 here--

  • that equals eight, right?

  • I think so.

  • Yeah, pins 2 to 9, that those are controllable,

  • so that I can say OK, send a signal.

  • And then when it gets that signal, then it'll turn on.

  • Hence the controller part of the Arduino,

  • but there's more purple wires.

  • Yes, so this-- I have it set up so

  • that it has an external power supply.

  • Because from what I understand, with these big, eight-channel

  • boards, the Arduino doesn't have enough power or enough amperage

  • to turn all of them on or off at a time.

  • So I don't want to burn out my board.

  • So I have this external supplier that

  • will supply the power to actually close the gates.

  • Like, one to four relays you found that you can supply off

  • the board without burning it out.

  • Yeah, exactly.

  • Then things like sketchy.

  • Then I just was scared.

  • What are we controlling, and how are we controlling it?

  • Is that where the software comes in?

  • This is where the software comes in.

  • So right now, we have some LED lamps plugged in here.

  • And that's a 12-volt load.

  • This is 12 volts, which is still way more

  • than the Arduino can do.

  • It can do five volts.

  • And then we also have an AC application here.

  • We have a fan plugged in here.

  • Don't worry.

  • This is safe, not like last week--

  • hopefully, we think-- or the week before last week.

  • So let's jump into the software, and I'll

  • show you how this is actually connected.

  • Cool.

  • How this is powered.

  • First, you need the actual Arduino software,

  • which you can find at Arduino.cc.

  • It's downloads for, I think, Mac, Linux, everything.

  • Intel Galileo.

  • So once you have that downloaded,

  • you'll see you have this cool little software here.

  • And the nice thing about Arduino especially

  • is that smart people have figured out

  • how to do whole lots of things already.

  • Yay.

  • So I found on this Arduino dash info dot Wikispaces dot com,

  • someone already wrote code to control a relay.

  • AKA Arduino power.

  • Yes, so I just straight copied and pasted this code

  • into our Arduino software here.

  • I'm going to say it, because it's my job--

  • is that legal, Michael?

  • Probably, they put it on the internet.

  • It's generally accepted and cool.

  • OK.

  • Just saying.

  • So the way you actually send code to the Arduino

  • is that you make sure you have it connected to your computer.

  • So this just has a USB cable.

  • So first of I'll compile the software, and then I'll upload.

  • So if you're getting errors here,

  • you probably have to select the port that you want to be on.

  • Things are happening.

  • In this case, I have the USB.

  • But it worked.

  • And as you can see, this code cycles through.

  • It turns on all the switches, and then turns them off.

  • It doesn't have to cycle them.

  • It's just what this particular application is doing.

  • Yeah, so this is very basic on how

  • you get an idea of what things in the code you actually need.

  • And then from there, you can start playing with the code.

  • So in this case, it's setting to be, like, a one-second delay.

  • If we want to get crazy, we can set it to be, like,

  • 40 milliseconds.

  • Which, when I--

  • You'll break my fan.

  • So I just sent it.

  • It'll take four seconds.

  • And then, oh, awesome.

  • And the thing I love about the mechanical relay

  • is you can hear them switching over.

  • So I'll just let this go for the rest of the episode.

  • (DRUMMING) OK, maybe not.

  • A little annoying.

  • So instead I have this code that I kind of

  • expanded a little bit.

  • It's definitely not the cleanest code ever,

  • but I'm sorry everyone.

  • It works.

  • So another cool thing you can do with Arduinos,

  • is-- that last application, you could take this.

  • It's all self-contained.

  • It doesn't need to be connected to a computer.

  • So you can just power the Arduino

  • and it will cycle through that forever, if you want.

  • You could have a crazy light display,