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  • Hi. This is Rebecca. In today's English In the News lesson, we're going to talk about

  • cyber theft. So what does "cyber theft" mean? The word "cyber" has to do with computers.

  • And the word "theft" has to do with stealing. All right? So let's look at three headlines

  • that were in the news recently regarding this subject of cyber theft. You'll also learn

  • lots of other vocabulary related to the same theme.

  • So the first headline said, "Target data theft affects 70 million". "Target", you should

  • know, is the name of a very large retail store in the United States and Canada and some other

  • places, perhaps. I know they are in Canada and the U.S. "target payment card heist."

  • "Target security breach." Okay? These were three different headlines in three different

  • newspapers about the same situation, the same story. Let's see what words they chose to

  • use. So here, we have "Target data theft." So that means data -- or "data" -- was stolen, and

  • it affected 70 million people. Here, they said "Target payment card heist". So what's

  • a "heist"? "Heist" is another word which means "robbery" or "stealing". Another way is "Target

  • security breach." So what's a "breach of security"? A "breach" is a kind of violation, when somebody

  • does something illegally that they are not allowed to do. They go over some limit that

  • they were not allowed to pass; that's a "breach". And in this case, it was a breach of -- or

  • violation of -- security. All right? So you have three different ways that they refer

  • to it already. "Data theft", "payment card heist", "security breach". See how you can

  • pick up these expressions -- all right? -- to improve your English?

  • Let's look out at a paragraph about that story. I'll just read it for you first. "Retail giant

  • Target confirmed a pre-Christmas cyber attack at over 1700 U.S. stores, resulting in payment

  • card and identity theft of over 70 million customers." Okay. A lot of information. A

  • lot of journalistic writing -- packs in a lot of information, especially in the first

  • paragraph. They're supposed to tell you who, what, when, where, why -- if they can -- or

  • how in that one paragraph because in case you don't have time to read the rest, at least

  • you've got the main information.

  • So let's see if we can figure out what that information was. So who were the victims here?

  • Who was affected by this crime? Well, "Retail giant Target" -- Target store was affected,

  • and as a result, their customers were affected. These were the victims of this attack, this

  • cyber attack.

  • Who were the criminals? Well, those who did the cyber attack. They're sometimes known

  • as cyber thieves; they're known as cyber hackers. But you'll see this term "cyber" because they're

  • not just regular thieves. They steal through the means of the computer. Okay?

  • What was the crime? You've now learned many expressions to describe this crime. But let's

  • see what we've found here. We have also found here "cyber attack", "payment card theft",

  • "identity theft", along with what we had up here, "data theft", "heist", and "breach".

  • Right? "Security breach." So what is "identity theft"? What does it mean to steal somebody's

  • identity? Well, it means to take all of their personal and private information -- their

  • name, perhaps their email address, their credit card information, their address, things like

  • that, phone number. And then, they might try to use your credit card and give your information

  • in an illegal way. So that's called "identity theft", stealing somebody's identity, pretending

  • to be that person, to do a fraudulent or illegal kind of transaction. Okay?

  • And when did this happen? Okay. Did you find the information in this paragraph to tell

  • you when it happened? It said "pre-Christmas cyber attack." Pre-Christmas" means "before

  • Christmas". Okay.

  • And where did it happen? Which places were affected by it? Here. 1700 U.S. stores.

  • All right? We can say the number like that, "seventeen hundred". You can also say "one thousand seven

  • hundred". All right?

  • So here, if you continue to read the story, you would find more vocabulary that you could

  • pick up. So here are three things that Target did after that -- after this happened -- and

  • three things that they asked the customers to do. So let's look at vocabulary they used here.

  • So Target confirmed the unauthorized access. They confirmed; they said, "Yes. It really

  • did happen." Some people accessed or gained illegal -- they managed to reach illegally

  • information that was not supposed to be theirs." "Unauthorized" -- it wasn't allowed. Okay.

  • Then, Target alerted the authorities. They warned the police, let's say. They got in

  • touch with the police. They investigated the incident. They probed further; they tried

  • to find out more information about what happened. "Incident" is any kind of occurrence, anything

  • that happens. Then, they asked their customers to do certain things. They asked them to monitor

  • their account information. "To monitor" something means to pay attention to what's happening

  • to it, to -- it's sort of -- yeah. Watch, watch what's happening. All right? "To remain

  • vigilant for fraud" -- look at all the vocabulary here. Not necessarily beginner vocabulary.

  • Quite advanced in some cases. "To remain vigilant" means to be on the lookout for, to watch out

  • for, to pay attention to what's happening. And what is "fraud"? "Fraud" is any kind of

  • cheating or lying or somebody gains a benefit through that. So somebody lied or cheated

  • in order to get something for themselves. That is "fraud". And here, we see another

  • form of the word "fraud". The customers are also told to report fraudulent activity. "Fraudulent"

  • is the adjective from the word "fraud". Any kind of improper activity. Okay?

  • So look at all the different kinds of vocabulary that you've got just from this one news story.

  • So remember; the news -- whether it's something you watch, whether it's something you read

  • or something you listen to -- is a great way to improve your English vocabulary. You'll

  • have a chance to review this vocabulary and listen to it again and read it again. And

  • you can pick up that vocabulary. Try to use some of this after this lesson. Try to write

  • out some sentences of your own regarding something else. And you could say -- you can use the

  • same vocabulary. You don't always have the use it for the same purpose. For example,

  • here, they confirmed the unauthorized access. But you might want to confirm a reservation,

  • right? You can confirm many things. You can alert the authorities. You can alert the police.

  • You can investigate an incident. You can investigate an accident. You can monitor account information,

  • or you can monitor your children when they're playing outside. Okay? Keep an eye on them.

  • You can remain vigilant for fraud. You can remain vigilant for any kind of suspicious

  • behavior on anybody's part. And you can report fraudulent activity, or you could report a

  • crime or an accident, right? So you can use these verbs for all kinds of purposes.

  • If you'd like to do a quiz on this, please go to our website, www.engvid.com. You could

  • also subscribe to my YouTube channel and get lots more English lessons. Okay?

  • So all the best with your English. Bye, for now.

Hi. This is Rebecca. In today's English In the News lesson, we're going to talk about

Subtitles and vocabulary

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B1 cyber theft breach vocabulary heist fraud

Learn English with the News: Cyber Crime

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    Sam posted on 2015/03/11
Video vocabulary