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  • The only areas where Ebola is still really present right now in Liberia is actually where

  • we are in Monrovia. I saw that they shoot people that try to cross

  • the border? Yeah because we have a lot of movement still

  • of refugees and a lot of gangs in the area. We have anti-government groups operating in

  • the area. Obviously the Ebola outbreak has been significantly

  • affecting operations. So let's say someone goes to the bathroom

  • and has Ebola, and you go the bathroom afterwards. Do you have a chance of catching Ebola then?

  • Yeah, small chance, you have a small chance. It is important to get patients with Ebola

  • into proper treatment facilities. This has been a disease that's had a very mayor impact

  • on the people living in these three most affected countries.

  • I remember coming back from Ethiopia where we did a Gaming For Good event and we had

  • finally hit that $20 million milestone. Gaming For Good, what does it do and how did

  • you come up with it? It's basically just a website were developers

  • donate their games and when people donate to charity, they get those games for free.

  • Athene and I always try to focus on whatever we think is the most important and effective

  • ways in which we can make a big difference. You have raised, in concert, with Razer, $9.4

  • million for Save the Children. Yes.

  • That is a lot of money. Ebola was looking really scary, there was

  • a lot of hysteria, it was all over the news and then came a CDC report saying that by

  • 2015 we could have as many as 1.4 million cases.

  • At the time there were around six - seven thousand cases and the world was already in

  • a panic, we immediately thought: Can we fundraise for it? Can we raise awareness with it, because

  • it seemed there were a lot of misconceptions. Can we travel to a place like Guinea, like

  • Sierra Leone, like Liberia. Could an NGO like Save The Children be able to sort of guarantee

  • our safety? Because the reason why we've gone to Mali, why we've gone to Indonesia and Ethiopia

  • is because it allows us to make it personal for our viewers.

  • I've already said I'm proud to be a gamer because of everything you guys have been doing.

  • I will be showing here the video so you guys can see what you have been doing, the changes

  • you have been bringing. Looking back, where we came from. The first

  • video I uploaded, 'best paladin in the world' and seeing where we are now, what we managed

  • to achieve together with you guys really puts a smile on my face.

  • Athene has a massive fan base as one of the most well known gamers in the world

  • and together we try to use this platform for activism and spreading awareness and fundraising.

  • We did it! We hit one million dollars! We hit one million dollars!

  • Turned out there were a lot of obstacles in trying to get such a trip planned and green-lit,

  • lots of briefings, security clearances, visas, tons of paperwork, mandatory life insurance,

  • medical insurance,... Save the Children was remarkably cooperative,

  • we thought they were going to say: "you guys are nuts, we're not doing this".

  • They've done stunt after stunt and sacrifice after sacrifice, spending 12 hours or more,

  • sometimes 16 hours a day for the past year and a half. Livestreaming just to raise awareness

  • and funds for Save the Children. For months and months every day we would have

  • a Skype call with Save the Children, we would talk about planning, we would talk about whether

  • we would be able to get to Guinea or Sierra Leone or Liberia, there would be conversations

  • with Country directors... We would be going over security protocols and all sorts of things

  • we had to go through like medical check-ups. Have you checked with your medical provider

  • to ensure that your trip or medical needs are covered.

  • You know what are the problems and what are the contagious things you have to pay attention

  • to.

  • Have you had a psychosocial briefing? Save is asking all of their staff who are

  • deploying for the Ebola response to meet with a member of the Humanitarian Staff Care.

  • Have you checked in with the local embassy and let them know you're traveling to Liberia?

  • We hope things will be okay before the end of the year.

  • I was wondering, since we were going to an Ebola-hit country, if it's a higher rate?

  • No, you don't have to pay a higher rate. If you're in good health, you can have the insurance.

  • It's a great risk for yourself, I think it's great that you do it.

  • Would you do it? I wouldn't, no.

  • Make sure that you've received and submitted all your paperwork and that's including your

  • medical clearances and things of that nature. And as if we didn't have enough obstacles

  • in our way already, friends and family were not too keen on the idea.

  • I'm guess I'm both excited and scared at the same time.

  • When I heard that my son wants to go to the Ebola environment, I was very afraid, I said:

  • no you don't go. I think that my uncle going to Ebola is kinda

  • stupid, it's actually a dangerous idea in my opinion.

  • You hear crazy stories about Ebola so you know there is always a risk I guess.

  • They have a completely wrong view about it, if I would just bring it up they would go

  • like, man you're crazy, you're going to die. Even my family thinks I'm going to die. Like

  • some people think I'm going to die. But it makes no sense. There are some health workers

  • that catch it but they're in direct contact with patients and they maybe miss protocols.

  • I don't think it's a good idea. I would not do it.

  • We would of course assure them: look we only do this if Save the Children can sort of guarantee

  • our safety. They can never 100% guarantee it. We had to sign a release form that basically

  • said that Save the Children is not responsible if anything were to happen to us. But still,

  • Save the Children was doing all that they could.

  • You do whatever what you want to do so I can't say nothing but it's maybe good to raise money

  • and to make awareness about illness. Athene, when do you both depart?

  • Monday. I don't really know what to expect, but we've

  • gone through a lot of security procedures and stuff so... I know some people are concerned

  • that we might get Ebola but the chances are really very very slim.

  • So we've finally got the green light from Save the Children, we finally had everything

  • sorted out. On our way there we tried to interview some

  • other travelers but almost none of them were allowed to speak, because they were all NGO's

  • or military or government. I live part time in Liberia, I'm from Liberia.

  • I've been helping the Ebola crisis since June. Health issues are a problem, clinics are a

  • problem, proper funding going to those ministries and proper medication and proper supplies

  • are very important. Ebola is just one of the few crises or issues

  • that happen in Liberia. More awareness is necessary.

  • Obviously it affects you. It affects the economy, it affected every segment of our society.

  • The disease is very horrible and very dangerous but it's something that we can contain and

  • something that we can prevent. I am aware that I need to be careful, I'm

  • afraid of not being able to handshake or afraid of not being able to hug my friends.

  • Proper funding and proper allocation of funds to the direct channels are definitely necessarry.

  • The moment we land we sort of immediately felt the gravity of the situation as you're

  • not able to get out of the airplane without washing your hands and having your temperature

  • checked. Excuse me. Did you wash your hands?

  • They had a huge tank of chlorine water set up where everyone had to wash their hands

  • and it said in big red letters 'Ebola is real'. This is something we were about to see everywhere.

  • You would have to wash your hands before entering someone's house and you would see how the

  • entire country's behavior had been changed by the outbreak.

  • At this point in time we hadn't actually announced anything yet, we had deliberately kept it

  • a secret because we knew that people might have tried to convince us or might have been

  • started petitions to persuade us from going to Liberia.

  • So later that night we released a video to announce that we were in Liberia.

  • Hi guys this is Athene, I�m here in Liberia. Driving right now from the airport to the

  • hotel. And I�m here with Save the Children, It�s

  • one of the countries that�s been hit the hardest by Ebola. The reason why we are here

  • is to raise awareness around it. Because the cause is so important, we thought we�d come

  • here and bring it closer to you guys. We also will make a documentary about it,

  • talk to survivors, we will go to Ebola clinics, we will be interviewing health-workers, we

  • will give you guys a window here on the ground.

  • At first we were in Monrovia, which is the capital of Liberia.

  • Everywhere you go, you would see billboards, inscriptions, wall paintings all mentioning

  • things like precautions, ways of spotting Ebola, what to do when youre ill.

  • It was omnipresent.

  • We traveled to Monrovia independently, but Phil Carroll would help us travel around Liberia

  • while making sure that we take all precautions and minimize any risk.

  • So everywhere you go, if it�s like a restaurant or a hotel, they will take your temperature

  • to make sure that you don't have a fever cause one of the first signs of Ebola is a fever.

  • So what happens if I have a fever?

  • If you have a fever, then you have to report it right away. It doesn�t mean you have

  • Ebola, you could just have a bad cold, you could have the flue, you could have malaria.

  • The only areas where Ebola is still really present right now in Liberia is actually where

  • we are in Monrovia.

  • If you then start to vomit or if you have really bad diarrhea then you become more of

  • like a probable or suspected case. So they probably pay closer attention to you.

  • I see, so do you go quarantine immediately?

  • You would probably go to an isolation room.

  • I would go to an isolation room and then to medical center.

  • Yes, we observe you for like 30 minutes and then ask a few questions, then we call an

  • ambulance to take you to the medical center.

  • So you have your own separate bathroom and your... Toilet room.

  • And then the ambulance comes to pick you up.

  • Yes.

  • The same stuff that�s in there is also in the sponge, and so what you do is, before

  • you enter, you just step here and whatever you may have dragged in on the bottom of your

  • shoes is now disinfected.

  • So let's say someone goes to the bathroom and has Ebola, an you go to the bathroom afterwards,

  • do you have a chance of catching Ebola then? Yeah, small chance, you have a small chance.

  • It is important to get patients with Ebola into proper treatment facilities.

  • We do have to be isolate people with Ebola as quickly as possible.

  • Everywhere you go, people would be very very aware and cautious.

  • Even when they are isolated, health-care workers will provide care.

  • It�s a very serious disease and most people die from it.

  • In Monrovia there are several Ebola clinics and there is a range of NGO's operating in

  • the area. So even though the population density was the highest in Monrovia and it's where

  • Ebola is still the most present, most of Liberia is much more remote and less actively monitored.

  • In many of these area's Ebola can take out entire families and disrupt entire communities

  • very easily. It was astounding to see the complexity of

  • the work that government and NGO�s like save the children were doing.

  • Cause aside for setting up Ebola treatment units and clinics, the logistics behind containing

  • and tracking the disease were quite complicated.

  • We got one case where the body would be moved up to a village in a taxi and the body was

  • kept between two individuals and the taxi driver dropped off the body and then went

  • driving up to another town and picked up a few other people.

  • That taxi driver is a contact of the Ebola victim, in this case someone we know died

  • from Ebola. There were over 1,000 people from that one person that died that we had to trace.

  • She died in Monrovia, but she died away from were she was from.

  • So they drove from the capital city all the way to their home community here.

  • When they were in the home community, they had a traditional burial. Now a traditional

  • burial normally means, there'll be washing of the body, there'll be family members all