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  • Prof: Good morning everybody.

  • We will be returning the exams on Thursday.

  • They're being graded now and we'll return them to you on

  • Thursday.

  • And I've always found, I've found in the past,

  • that having--once we finish the midterm exam,

  • and all of you have had a chance to go back over the

  • material, mastered it,

  • is the ideal time to begin to talk about a selection of a

  • paper topic, a term paper topic.

  • And I'm going to concentrate on that particular issue in today's

  • class, the choice of a paper topic.

  • Right before Spring Break is also a good time to begin

  • thinking about this, because there are a lucky few

  • of you in here who are actually going to Rome,

  • for Spring Break, and there are others that are

  • heading home to California, possibly near Malibu -- might

  • have a chance to go to the Getty Museum,

  • in Malibu, which is based on an important villa,

  • ancient Roman villa at Herculaneum,

  • as well as other travels that may give you some ideas about

  • potential paper topics.

  • And don't underestimate just the experience of architecture

  • of any period, in terms of inspiring you,

  • as you go to whatever city you're headed toward,

  • or even whatever small town you're headed toward.

  • Looking at what's around you can be a stimulation to making a

  • selection on a paper topic.

  • So I want to go over that with you today.

  • Also I'm going to show you some magnificent parts of the Roman

  • Empire, as a prelude to what we'll be doing when we get back

  • after Spring Break.

  • And that is, although we'll spend--we'll do

  • one lecture on Hadrian and the Pantheon,

  • and Hadrian's Villa at Tivoli, and one on a colony in Italy,

  • namely Ostia, the port of Rome.

  • From that point on we'll make our way around the rest of the

  • Roman Empire.

  • We'll go to North Africa, we'll go to Jordan.

  • We'll go to other parts of the Middle East.

  • We'll go to France and Spain.

  • So we'll be spending spring going around the Roman Empire to

  • some extraordinary spots.

  • And I think by introducing you to some of those today,

  • vis-à-vis the paper topics,

  • will get you in the mood, I hope, for that kind of

  • whirlwind tour that we're going to take in the second half of

  • this semester.

  • Now I'd like to spend the rest of the time again showing you

  • some magnificent places, giving you a sense of the three

  • options for the paper topics, and specific monuments and

  • sites that I hope you'll consider as possibilities for

  • your paper.

  • And again, as I mentioned, it's also a good chance for us

  • to begin to experience the provinces of the Roman Empire.

  • Obviously I've chosen topics that are ones that for the most

  • part-- there's one or two

  • exceptions--but for the most part are not topics that I'm

  • going to be going over in class, to give you an opportunity to

  • look into a part of the world that we may not cover in class,

  • but also to be able to use what you have learned about Roman

  • buildings in general to decipher buildings that you haven't yet

  • seen before.

  • The first of these--well the first option;

  • there are three options, as I mentioned before--

  • and Option 1 is a straightforward research paper

  • that is comparable, obviously, to research papers

  • that you've done, not only in other Art History

  • courses, but in other History courses

  • and other-- whatever courses,

  • even science courses-- a straight research paper in

  • which you have a topic that you do a considerable amount of

  • reading on, focused reading,

  • on that particular topic, and I give you bibliography for

  • all of these.

  • And, by the way, all of these,

  • pretty much all of these bibliographical sources are on

  • reserve, in the Art and Architecture Library,

  • for this course.

  • With a group this size, obviously if a number of you

  • choose the same topic, I don't want a situation and

  • whoever-- the early bird catches the

  • worm--whoever gets the book out of Sterling has it and nobody

  • else can get to it.

  • So I have put the books on reserve for this course.

  • I know that creates other challenges,

  • because you can't take it home with you,

  • but--and it means you do need to share--

  • but it will mean that it will be there for you,

  • in the library.

  • In some instances there are second copies at the University.

  • So again, in that sense, the early bird can catch the

  • worm, if there is a second or third copy that can be checked

  • out.

  • So I do urge you, if you have a pretty good sense

  • of what it is that you may want to work on,

  • and want to pick up a book or two before you leave for Spring

  • Break, the next couple of days would

  • be the time to do that.

  • So the first topic--so under Research Paper,

  • again a straightforward research paper in which you do

  • some reading, you do some looking,

  • you think about this monument; you think about its own special

  • characteristics, as well as where it fits into

  • in the evolution of Roman architecture.

  • And one hopes, of course, that you'll do both

  • synthetic -- once you've done your reading

  • and your research, that you will present this work

  • of architecture synthetically.

  • But at the same time I hope that you will have a thesis,

  • that there will be something that you will come up with on

  • your own, a major point,

  • a major focus, that you'll want to have and

  • that you'll want to make.

  • And that you'll want to use the paper toward arguing some thesis

  • of your own-- even though,

  • for the most part, it will be a synthesis of what

  • you read, what's understood--and a

  • placement of it.

  • Since you now know Rome itself particularly well,

  • if you choose a topic of a building,

  • or a group of buildings that are outside Rome,

  • the relationship of what's going on,

  • on the periphery, to what is going on in the

  • center, and the relationship of center

  • to periphery.

  • So the first topic I give you under Research Paper is the

  • Roman city of Corinth, which is in Greece.

  • This would be a good paper topic for the classicists among

  • you; and I know there are some.

  • Anyone who's into--who's fairly well steeped in Greek culture,

  • as well as Roman culture and civilization,

  • who might want to look back at a Greek city,

  • a city that was already very built up under the Greeks,

  • as early as the Archaic Period.

  • This is a view, for example,

  • of the Greek Archaic Temple at Corinth.

  • So a Greek city, a very well developed Greek

  • city, that is eventually taken over by the Romans,

  • and the Romans remake it in the Roman manner.

  • They add typical Roman buildings to it,

  • create a kind of mini Rome, in Greece.

  • But it's interesting to see the way in which those new buildings

  • blend with those that were built there earlier.

  • I also mention here not only the Archaic Temple at Corinth,

  • but also the so-called Isthmus at Corinth.

  • You might remember, from our conversation about

  • Julius Caesar and the architecture that he built,

  • that Julius Caesar was the one who built a canal at the Isthmus

  • of Corinth.

  • And the canal that is still visible and used at Corinth

  • today-- which you see an excellent view

  • of on the left-hand side of the screen--

  • is essentially the same canal that was built initially,

  • or begun initially, by Julius Caesar.

  • So that gives you some sense of a Roman addition to the scene.

  • And I show you just one other example.

  • There are quite a number of buildings preserved from

  • Corinth, Roman buildings.

  • So one could do--for a paper like this,

  • one could do an overview of the Roman city,

  • all the pieces of the Roman city, how the urban fabric

  • worked, or you could choose one or two

  • buildings at Corinth, at Roman Corinth,

  • to concentrate on.

  • I show you, for example, a view of the remains of the

  • Roman Baths at Corinth.

  • And what's interesting about these--

  • and you can pick this out on your own already,

  • just by looking at this one view--what's interesting about

  • these is although they look back to Roman bath architecture,

  • in Italy, you can see that this bath is made entirely of