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  • - I did not expect the response.

  • - It was so great to see the whole world become obsessed.

  • - No, I've never experienced a show that goes viral.

  • [reels clicking]

  • That's the first time, I think.

  • [gentle uplifting piano music]

  • - The first time I met John Galliano,

  • I saw him across the room.

  • I thought I can't allow this moment to pass.

  • - It was one of those nights I was leaving a club with Kate.

  • All fine, all fine.

  • And then this Gwendoline came out

  • from the bowels of the club.

  • And I remember Alexis was with us and I was like,

  • "Who's that? Who's that?"

  • And jumped in the club just a bit,

  • but never forgot that image.

  • - John's work has been hugely influential to me

  • since I was a teenager,

  • and John was extraordinarily kind

  • and said that he hoped that we would work together one day.

  • - I've been a fan of Gwendoline's for a long, long time.

  • She didn't know.

  • And I think in one of those banters we were having,

  • I said, "You know we've met before."

  • And she went completely red.

  • She went, "Oh, I thought you would never,

  • you'd forgotten that and you..."

  • It was quite sweet.

  • - This is the first time I've walked

  • in one of John Galliano's shows.

  • Even saying that feels so bizarre.

  • - She put the time in.

  • She came in for the fittings three or four times,

  • trips to London,

  • sous-vetements, the undergarments, the corset training,

  • and created the dress on her, really.

  • - It's really influenced me more greatly

  • than perhaps I can even convey.

  • Wild imagination but coupled with real craftsmanship.

  • Those things coming together and creating true artistry.

  • [gentle dreamy music]

  • - Well, my research books,

  • I love the way they're all kenned up

  • like little butterflies.

  • You can help yourself.

  • You can flick through

  • and you see there's research on dolls,

  • van Dongen is some of the makeup ideas that we played with

  • and the colors.

  • Over here, it's like a cabinet of curiosity.

  • So we have the Juliette corset,

  • the Ethel corset, the cincher,

  • and these are for boys and girls.

  • [page rustles] [gentle dreamy music]

  • Happy to discuss some of the newness, if you like,

  • or some of the new techniques.

  • Retrograding,

  • the idea that you could almost treat

  • the subject wearing the dress like a line drawing.

  • So imagine you start with just a crayon at the top

  • and that crayon becomes more intense

  • as you get to the waist.

  • Then through color and fabric,

  • and a retrograde of techniques,

  • you build up the three dimensionality of that dress.

  • It was like degrade?

  • So degrade day of line, degrade of technique,

  • degrade of textures.

  • - When I saw the collection,

  • I saw quite how beautiful it was.

  • The innovation with the fabrics,

  • the narrative, the storytelling, the emotion.

  • When I saw all of those things,

  • it connected back to what his work has brought me.

  • - At that level of dressmaking,

  • which is the highest form of dressmaking,

  • just once a year,

  • because of the time.

  • It involves the structures,

  • the substructures, and the engineering,

  • especially building a dress on a redefined body shape.

  • That's what I wanted to do.

  • It was inspired by many references.

  • - I looked at the Brassai photographs.

  • That's what he talked about.

  • And I knew those photographs very well

  • because I'd been quite obsessed with them

  • when I was around 20.

  • They used to stare at those photographs

  • and think about who the people were,

  • and what the stories were, what had been happening.

  • - Once we had redefined the body shape,

  • it was only then that I could start to build the dress.

  • So it always had to come back to that waist measurement.

  • A corset, otherwise the dress wouldn't fit.

  • [soft reflective music]

  • I'd already started to work

  • with curvier girls on couture private orders.

  • I wanted to do that more so I embraced it.

  • I absolutely embraced it.

  • The casting was all-inclusive.

  • - I thought the casting was spectacular.

  • I thought it was really great

  • because we saw so many different types of people.

  • What was incredibly modern about the show

  • was that it was exploring a totally different silhouette

  • from one we're used to seeing.

  • - The different morphology.

  • It was just so exciting and so challenging.

  • Everything was, you know, you had to find an answer.

  • You had to work it out.

  • - I am extremely tall and I'm certainly not sample size,

  • and I thought it was beautifully radical for John

  • to amplify and intensify my size

  • and my proportions,

  • and change them and really be extreme

  • about what I am and who I am.

  • [soft playful music]

  • Well, Pat McGrath is also a genius.

  • I know that can be an overused phrase,

  • but it's used rightfully so.

  • With Pat, we became friends

  • because she found me in a nightclub years ago,

  • and I was wearing a look of hers and she said,

  • "I love your makeup. I want to take a photograph of you."

  • At that time, I didn't know what Pat McGrath looked like,

  • so just this woman had taken a photograph of me.

  • We talked about makeup and afterwards,

  • someone said, "That was Pat McGrath."

  • And I went, "No!" [laughs]

  • I really missed out on a huge moment.

  • [soft dramatic ambient music]

  • - Well, I remember it was early January and we...

  • You know, I had my briefing

  • and then John just told me this amazing story.

  • You know, we were gonna be under a bridge.

  • He showed me the lighting

  • and then also showed me all of these incredible characters

  • with such incredible detail.

  • And then John showed me this porcelain doll

  • and was like, "I'd love to take it to glass skin."

  • So instantly, I knew we were gonna have

  • to find something completely new and different.

  • I knew we were gonna have to take it there.

  • - We'd been working on something

  • that we call Margiela's skin for a long time now.

  • One of the inspirations was the China doll.

  • So it's something we had gradually been working towards,

  • but here was the opportunity to really go for it.

  • So I said, "Let's go for it."

  • - Once you're told you have to do a new skin

  • that has never existed before,

  • you know you have to develop something

  • that is out of this world.

  • We started with the look, the look was kind of more matte.

  • We kept trying to add more shine,

  • but to me,

  • it looked like something we'd already seen before.

  • It was all about the designs, the weight.

  • How do you make skin look like porcelain?

  • It was really measured and how the makeup is applied

  • and the lightness.

  • And like we said,

  • we couldn't do anything that was clown white.

  • It had to be very subtle.

  • - That took a lot of working up,

  • just from the point of view of timing.

  • So I think to begin though, there was seven layers.

  • Seven layers, and the effect was just like, wow.

  • You know, when the boys and girls walked here,

  • we were just like blown over.

  • - We went into the Margiela offices

  • and then we showed the first look with the new glass skin,

  • and everybody was standing ovation by the whole team.

  • - To come into this Margiela show