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  • When I was in the Marine Corps, during my school of infantry training, one of my instructors told me that every action movie was about to be ruined for the rest of my life.

  • And he was correct.

  • It's just not possible for me to watch something involving military tactics or strategy or something along those lines without just picking it apart mentally with all the inaccuracies.

  • I mean, why on earth are they still saying, "I repeat in the radio?"

  • It makes no sense.

  • But that's a different story for another day.

  • The same though can be said for medical knowledge.

  • Not only are the characters in these TV shows and movies, surviving events, they shouldn't survive,

  • they're not getting overly injured or if they are, it's just a flesh wound and I still don't understand what this flesh wound business is.

  • So my hope is that you and I can bond in sharing this pain now.

  • Because in today's video, we're going to use the cadavers to look at three types of injuries that I tend to notice the most in these movies and TV shows that just seriously bug me.

  • So hopefully they can start bugging you in the exact same way.

  • It's gonna be a slightly frustrating one.

  • Let's do this.

  • First up, we have primary blast injuries.

  • Now we've all seen it, right?

  • That epic scene where our hero is walking away with that massive explosion behind them.

  • They're not looking because they're too cool for that.

  • Or maybe they're running, they jump and they narrowly escape this wall of flame coming at them.

  • Either way, it's still going to be the same problem, and the problem is the laws of physics.

  • Because when an explosion happens, not only do you have shrapnel coming at you and fire coming at you, you also have a blast wave coming at you.

  • And depending on how close you are to the explosion and the size of that explosive device, that's gonna have an impact on what it does to your body specifically.

  • Now, if it affects your eye, we call that blast eye.

  • Blood vessels can rupture. Your eyes can start to swell and you can even go blind.

  • If it affects your lungs and respiratory tracts, we call that blast lung.

  • You can have bleeding inside of your respiratory tracts, you're aspirating, you could get a collapsed lung, you're just gonna have overall difficulty in breathing.

  • But there's two that I mainly want to focus on.

  • And the first one is what we call blast brain.

  • Now, you're looking at a left hemisphere of a human cerebrum.

  • So there's gonna be different lobes like the frontal lobe, the parietal lobe, the occipital lobe in the back.

  • But what I want you to understand is just how delicate the brain tissue is.

  • Right?

  • Neurological tissue is extraordinarily delicate.

  • And I'm sure this is something you intuitively understand.

  • But picture this blast wave coming through, going through the skull and starting to propagate into the neurological tissue.

  • It can cause brain bleeds to happen.

  • If you look closely, you can see all these darkened lines, those are blood vessels, those can rupture.

  • You can also get rupturing of the actual neurological tissue itself.

  • You could get the brain slamming into the skull and these are all forms of what we call traumatic brain injuries.

  • And we've seen this in service members through in war for many, many years, right?

  • Explosions cause traumatic brain injuries.

  • Yet, in these action movies, they just seem to survive explosion after explosion and they just go home like it's no big deal.

  • And it drives me nuts because they should have some pretty serious psychological and neurological damage, simply from the blast wave hitting and traveling through their brain.

  • The second primary blast injury is what's called blast belly and that's going to affect the internal organs here in the abdomen.

  • But real quick, because I forgot to mention earlier.

  • I'm curious to know what other medical injuries you find Hollywood movies or TV shows are ignoring because these three are by no means the only ones.

  • So be sure to leave us a comment below and maybe we might address that in a future video.

  • But with blast belly, if you look here at these internal organs, you can picture that blast wave is going to affect them just like it did with the brain.

  • So this massive organ here is the liver.

  • This can actually fracture, it can rupture and break here on the side.

  • Let's see if I can pull this out.

  • This is the spleen, the spleen is a reservoir for blood.

  • So if this ruptures, you will be bleeding at a massive quantities inside of your abdomen.

  • The stomach, which is behind the liver here.

  • This little pink thing, hopefully, you can see that. That can rupture.

  • The small intestine can rupture; the colon or large intestine can rupture.

  • And in fact, this is the most likely organ to rupture from a primary blast injury.

  • All of this can happen just because you were too close to the explosion when you're trying to be all epic and run away.

  • I don't know what's going on. In all these movies, all of this somehow heals.

  • As far as I'm concerned, it must be magic.

  • But you know what really is magic?

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  • All right, let's get back to it.

  • Next up.

  • We have bone and joint injuries and Jeffrey has been nice enough to offer a helping hand in this situation.

  • But these ones really bother me because they're almost always ignored in movies and TV shows.

  • Go ahead and think about punches, one of the most universal things you see in action movies.

  • Not even just action movies and TV shows, you see this all over the place; people punch someone and then they just move on and it's absolutely insane.

  • Like let's just picture a haymaker is delivered right to the side of the face.

  • You can get multiple fractures in the maxilla bone, the Zygomatic bone, the mandible, right?

  • The nasal bones can break and that can cause massive amounts of swelling.

  • It can cause eye injuries.

  • You can cause bleeding, tremendous bleeding, profuse bleeding from the nose.

  • And then that's not even to talk about the injuries to the hand itself, right?

  • There's a reason why professional fighters typically use padded gloves.

  • And that's because even though there are techniques and forms and things to really, you know, limit the damage you could do to yourself.

  • It's still physics, you're still just smashing two hard things together.

  • So and that just doesn't make for a good movie.

  • If you see Rambo Deliver this Haymaker perfectly and then break his hand and then he can't fire the machine gun.

  • It ruins the movie.

  • So I understand why we have to suspend our disbelief and just let him punch someone and move on.

  • But it drives me nuts how casual people can be with punching and receiving the punch.

  • Oftentimes in movies and TV shows someone gets punched, gets punched and then you see them a few hours later in the movie in the, in their timeline.

  • And there's just a little bit of bruising.

  • It's like you just got punched by Sylvester Stallone or Rambo.

  • Your face would be swollen.

  • You would, you, you're hurting really bad right now, drives me up the wall.

  • But another one are going to be joint injuries say like to the shoulder area.

  • Now, this is what we call the pectoral girdle and that's just going to be the clavicle or your collar bone as most people would call it.

  • Then we also have this longer bone here called the humerus and then behind it, what most people would call the shoulder blade.

  • But this is really the scapula bone.

  • You have to understand that these are barely attached to your body.

  • The only bone on bone contact is going to be here where the clavicle is meeting with the sternum.

  • And we call this the sternoclavicular joint.

  • All the other attachments are gonna be muscular attachments a picture like in movies say someone's falling and our hero reaches out and grabs them just in time.

  • Their arms extend.

  • There's a lot of pressure, there's a lot of screaming.

  • The amount of pressure and pulling and just pulling forces on both of their shoulder joints is extraordinary.

  • Muscles are gonna be tearing cartilage like the lam that goes around the shoulder joint itself is going to be tearing, right.

  • Unless you have some kind of connective tissue disorder, your joints aren't meant to just dislocate and then pop back into place and everything is fine.

  • Dislocations come with consequences and you know, all this put uh pulling or even pushing, maybe they land strange on their, you know, on their arms like this, that's gonna cause pressure in the elbows, that's gonna cause pressure in the sternal clavicular joint.

  • All of these come with consequences and potential fractures.

  • It's out of control.

  • Just think about how many times you've seen in action movies people jump, even if it's 10 15 20 ft land.

  • Sure, they do a role.

  • But even if they're avoiding an explosion like we already discussed, that's one problem.

  • Now, their joints are all being smashed into one another.

  • It creates chaos.

  • The fact is your body breaks pretty easily because that's a better alternative than having organs rupture or things of those lines.

  • So what will happen is bones will break to help, to dissipate force.

  • But again, none of this makes for a good action sequence.

  • If our hero jumps epically and breaks six bones and is now laying there in immense pain.

  • The third and final type of injury that just bugs me are going to be penetrating injuries or penetrating traumas such as say like a gunshot or a stabbing or something along those lines.

  • Now, for the head, a lot of those action sequences are pretty accurate in terms of it's just if it happens, it happens and things are pretty much over from there.

  • But other places not so much.

  • I mean, again, if we focus here on the abdomen, if you get shot in the belly, you may live a decent amount of time that can happen for sure.

  • But I don't think they really accurately represent just how problematic this is in terms of.

  • Now you have digestive material going into the abdominal cavity or if it ruptures the colon, like here in the in colon, you could have feces entering into the abdominal cavity and you were gonna go septic.

  • Like we mentioned, the spleen here is a blood reservoir.

  • So if this gets shot, that's a big problem, you're going to be bleeding out into your abdominal cavity, right, pretty much anywhere that that gets shot here is gonna have a severe issue.

  • I mean, if it goes back and hits the vertebral column or your spinal column, the bullet can then ricochet and go into several different places.

  • So, but I think movies do a reasonable job of that.

  • But still a lot of times I'll see, you know, the hero get shot and it, maybe it goes right through like the side, maybe like right around here and they just kind of again, treat it as a flesh wound and walk it off.

  • Not so much because you're gonna have several blood vessels.

  • The muscles have been shot and are now injured and they are gonna start to contract.

  • And that's something you've got to understand.

  • Even say if you get shot, let me grab this over here in an arm.

  • So I'm about to show a hand, there's gonna be some fingers on here.

  • So if this is something you don't want to see, please look away right now.

  • But I have a right upper limb here.

  • Let's say you get shot or stabbed or injured just in the limb.

  • And this is where you typically see in a lot of action sequences.

  • It described as a flesh wound, right?

  • It goes through the arm, they put a bandage around it and they call it a day.