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  • Well I'm about to find out because I'm going to  the lab to get my blood drawn then I'm going to  

  • eat 100 eggs in seven days. I'm gonna get more  blood drawn, I'm going to compare the results  

  • and I'm gonna share them with you. Hello Health  Champions this is a very detailed cholesterol  

  • analysis of before and after I ate a hundred  eggs in seven days and I know the number one  

  • question on everyone's lips right now is did the  cholesterol go up but if you have that question  

  • that is the absolute wrong question and if you  clicked on this video just to find that out I  

  • absolutely guarantee that you will completely miss  the point of this video so please don't skip ahead  

  • I'm going to talk about eighty percent about how  cholesterol works and how they report it because  

  • if you don't have those Basics then what happened  to me will be completely and totally irrelevant  

  • but if you stick with it you're going to learn  some things that could save your life what we  

  • want to look at is the big picture and the balance  between some key markers so I'm going to designate  

  • with arrows if something stayed the same if it got  better or if it got worse so my total cholesterol  

  • went from 207 to 277. so that is about the same  and now you're just saying hey this guy is totally  

  • crazy 207 is not the same as 277 and yes I can  see that the number changed but what I'm talking  

  • about is the risk factor the total risk factor  and we're going to talk a lot about that my LDL  

  • went from 1 36 to 201 and that is also about the  same because by themselves those markers don't  

  • mean a whole lot my triglycerides stayed about  the same both the number and the risk factor  

  • my HDL went up a good bit so that's a little  bit of an improvement more isn't always better  

  • once you get up to 90 or 100 then it can be high  for the wrong reasons but if you're in the 50 60  

  • 70 range then more is better also my TSH went up  which has to do with thyroid function and a slow  

  • thyroid can reduce your ability to process and  metabolize cholesterol and then we're going to  

  • talk about the size of the LDL particles and  here's something that got a little bit worse  

  • designated by a red arrow but the question is  how much worse did it get so if you stay with  

  • me you're going to grasp this picture and I don't  want anyone ever to get on a damaging medication  

  • for the wrong reasons if you're going to start  something you need to know why and you need to  

  • understand at least most of these markers and  what they mean and how they relate also we need  

  • of course a few disclaimers my results may not  be typical don't compare your results to mine but  

  • rather understand the mechanisms that I'm talking  about this is a study called n of 1 meaning the  

  • sample size is one person so statistically that  means very very little and results are also going  

  • to depend on genetics and your overall metabolic  health and finally this study is only seven days  

  • so in that time period you're not going to seelot of long-term changes and why was it so short  

  • well you try eating 15 eggs a day and seven days  are going to seem like a pretty long time and we  

  • also want to understand that results can be skewed  by events and complications that happen so if on  

  • day four you run into some yellow jackets or  three of them and you're highly sensitive that  

  • can create an inflammatory Cascade that can  also skew the results so I don't know if this  

  • influenced it but we have to keep that things like  that in the back of our mind and we also need to  

  • understand the concept of margin of error that  if something just changes is a couple of points  

  • it really doesn't mean anything so in this case  this is the same test page 1 and Page Three it is  

  • the same blood draw it was six vials taken from  the same vein at the same time on 10 12 and yet  

  • when they send it to two different departments one  it to evaluate the NMR and want to do the regular  

  • lipid profile we get two different results so  for this test on 10 12 there's a four percent  

  • discrepancy in the cholesterol that they measured  and when they checked the triglycerides there was  

  • even a 16 margin of error and this is something  they measure from the same blood sample and then  

  • the marker that most people are the most concerned  with is the LDL cholesterol and if you notice in  

  • parentheses here it says calculated that means  they don't actually measure LDL cholesterol well  

  • most of the time because it's very expensive most  of the time they're going to calculate it based on  

  • total cholesterol HDL and triglycerides and they  have a very complicated formula but if there's an  

  • error or margin of these numbers then you're also  going to have a margin of error on LDL so in this  

  • particular case there was an eight percent error  in the LDL and then eight days later when I did it  

  • again I'm not going to give you all those numbers  but we had four percent on the total we had one  

  • and a half percent error on the triglycerides and  we had a four percent error on the LDL so all of  

  • this is just to say that don't look at too much at  the nitty-gritty if one marker changes it doesn't  

  • really mean a whole lot if eight markers change  then we want to see are they moving in the same  

  • direction do we see a trend do we understand how  these work together and if you came here to find  

  • out what happens if you eat 100 eggs in seven days  then first we have to understand what is supposed  

  • to be a healthy cholesterol and what is reallyhealthy cholesterol so first of all here is what's  

  • supposed to be this is what we've been told that  there's different levels of cholesterol that range  

  • from dangerous to at risk to what's called heart  healthy and in the general model lower cholesterol  

  • is always healthier but we're going to question  that very very strongly so they say a total  

  • cholesterol should be less than 200 you're at risk  between 200 and 239 and over 240 it is dangerous  

  • it is in the red zone it's like you're walkingheart attack you could blow up at any time your  

  • LDL they say should be less than 100 and if you  saw on my test it was 200 and I'm not particularly  

  • concerned and maybe I'm crazy or maybe I know  this a little bit better than some at risk is 100  

  • to 130 and anything over 130 is dangerous and the  third marker often mentioned is triglycerides and  

  • they want that under 150 you're at risk between  150 and 199 and you're in a danger zone over 200  

  • and keep in mind mine are in the 50s and 60s but  with people who are truly at risk these numbers  

  • for triglycerides can get into 500 800 a thousand  and then when they quote these numbers they often  

  • say that don't blame yourself because there's  a lot of people with high cholesterol but don't  

  • worry because we have medications that can get  you from the danger zone into the heart healthy  

  • zone but what if none of that is true what is if  they got it completely wrong and maybe instead of  

  • blaming yourself you should celebrate your higher  cholesterol now please please keep in mind I'm not  

  • saying that higher is always better you could  be healthy with a high or a low cholesterol you  

  • could be sick with a high or a low cholesterol but  let's start understand how this works let's take a  

  • look at what Nature has to say about it it's the  leading science journal in the world and here's a  

  • study where they looked at the total cholesterol  relationship to all cause mortality meaning they  

  • don't care what they died from they just did  a study and they saw how many people died and  

  • what were their cholesterol 10 years earlier so  this is what's called a prospective cohort that  

  • means they measure the results first and then  they look at the results later so they have very  

  • little influence when they measure it they don't  know who is going to end up doing what so they  

  • did 12.8 million people and this was basically  everyone in Korea every adult in Korea that came  

  • through their Health Care system that recorded  everybody for a period of time between 2001 and  

  • 2004 and then 10 years later they followed up  and they basically kept it really simple they  

  • just saw how many people died and what were  their cholesterol 10 years earlier so 600  

  • 000 people died which is kind of normal across  the population five percent of people died in 10  

  • years and then this was published in 2019 so it's  relatively recent now let me break this down and  

  • make it simple for you this graph shows the hazard  ratio the risk of dying with a baseline of one  

  • so if you get up to two that means you doubled  your risk of death and if we look at this from  

  • the highest level of cholesterol where you have  cholesterol of 300 we see that that increased the  

  • risk by 30 percent whereas a very low cholesterol  of 110 120 increased your risk by 230 percent so a  

  • low cholesterol is eight times more dangerous than  a high cholesterol and I've had patients walk into  

  • the clinic with a cholesterol of 115 who were on  a Statin medication for many many years and when I  

  • asked them why are you on a Statin they said well  the doctors think it's the best just in case so  

  • they're taking a toxic medication that interferes  with the liver and get it down to a level where  

  • the risk of death is eight times higher just  from the cholesterol not the medication itself  

  • and now let's superimpose that color scale  from the previous slide where the green zone  

  • is lower in the mainstream in the current model  less cholesterol is always better they say but  

  • when we see how the so-called safe Zone has the  highest risk of all cause death we got to start  

  • questioning that right and what they call the  danger zone over 240 anything over 200 is at risk  

  • or in danger and that is where the curve is the  lowest that's the almost flat portion of the curve  

  • where the lowest risk is what they call the danger  zone and if we blow up that portion of the graph  

  • a little bit you can see that the curve is almost  flat you're going to increase your risk by two to  

  • three percent uh between 200 and 250. so that's  kind of the ideal not counting any other factors  

  • not counting metabolic syndrome or anything else  but 200 to 250 would be the safest range to be in  

  • we can also see that one 85 is about the same  risk as 265 or 170 is about the same risk as  

  • 280. but why is it then that there are all these  other studies you ask that say for years that  

  • it's undoubtable it's unquestionable that lower  cholesterol is healthier we have to understand who  

  • pays for those studies and how are they conducted  so yes they conform to very strict standards  

  • they're called double-blind Placebo control and  all that good stuff but whoever pays for the study  

  • owns the study and if they don't get the results  that they were looking for they're not going to  

  • publish that study why would you pay money and  then get bad results and then tell everybody the  

  • bad results it just doesn't work like that soout of 10 studies never get published and the ones  

  • that do get published they're not like super clear  it's like if you stand back far enough and you  

  • squint a little bit and you look at it sideways  then you could see that it's a little better like  

  • a couple of percent Improvement here and there  there is nothing really clear and then if you do  

  • enough of those studies then you're going to see  a pattern eventually but remember ninety percent  

  • were never published now this single graph here  is both genders and all ages so if we go and we  

  • look at the little bit older people 75 and up  and we look at men and women on the same graph  

  • uh now we see that that curve flattens out even  more so even at a cholesterol of 300 we're seeing  

  • like an eight to ten percent increased risk and  part of this might be that higher cholesterol  

  • is very protective for the brain that when people  get older they have much lower levels of dementia  

  • and neurological diseases if their cholesterol is  a bit higher but now it gets really good so we're  

  • going to come back to this graph we talked  about we're going to add a little bit to it  

  • and look at it a little bit differently so if  we measure insulin which I always do and 99.9  

  • percent of the time it's never done then we find  a reference range of 2.6 to 25 essentially so a  

  • normal range is two to five 25 is called type  2 diabetes it is called metabolic syndrome it  

  • is called severe metabolic disease and mine if  you notice was 2.9 that's typical for me then if  

  • we look at another marker called triglycerides  the normal range is 0 to 149 mine was 57 and if  

  • you look at what's normal is considered under  150 but mild to moderate is up to 500 that is  

  • an absolutely astounding number no one should  ever ever be close to that range and severe is  

  • considered 500 to a thousand so here's the point  that this curve only measures total cholesterol so  

  • it includes a lot of people with metabolic disease  and type 2 diabetes and these diabetics are going  

  • to be mostly on the high end because diabetics  and people with metabolic disease are not going  

  • to have super low triglycerides and super low  cholesterol so a healthy thing is to have high  

  • total cholesterol but low for the other metabolic  markers but this curve like I said is going to  

  • include a lot of people with type 2 diabetes and  those are the people who are sick those are the  

  • people driving this curb up so I would make a very  strong case for the fact that if we control if we  

  • actually didn't just measure total cholesterol  but we also ask who is a diabetic and we took  

  • those people out of that curve I I am convinced  that the curve would be virtually flat and I don't  

  • think a cholesterol of a thousand is necessarily  good and I don't know where it starts getting  

  • dangerous but I know it is much much higher than  300. I bet you've heard a million times that LDL  

  • is the bad cholesterol well that's not how it  works because the body makes LDL cholesterol  

  • and your body wouldn't make something bad trust me  however if this LDL gets damaged by inflammation  

  • then it shrinks if we have a lot of sugar it  causes glycation if we have a lot of oxidative  

  • stress like kind of rusting or inflammation all  those things shrink and damage the LDL particle  

  • and that is the bad thing not the LDL particle in  itself so in this test called an NMR they actually  

  • measure and count the LDL particles and they  measure their size so they want the total number  

  • to be less than a thousand and I went from 1491 to  1970. so by official standards my numbers were Sky  

  • High but I'm not concerned because if these are  large and fluffy and undamaged that represents  

  • no risk so what really matters is how many of the  total particles have been damaged and shrunk and