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  • - Many recruiters when they get objections,

  • they view them as a barrier to success.

  • In fact, hiring authorities have shared

  • with me over and over again

  • that they know the two or three objections

  • to give to recruiters to just get them to hang up.

  • And so you got to understand

  • that when they're giving you an objection,

  • they really want to know how much you believe

  • in what you're doing.

  • An objection is a buying sign.

  • It's a request for more information.

  • And as a recruiter, you have to understand something.

  • You can't just be good at overcoming objections.

  • This is a skillset that you must become great at

  • because overcoming objections is really critical

  • to your success.

  • What I want to do is give you some ideas today

  • that you can easily implement

  • that basically are going to have you welcome objections

  • versus dread them.

  • Now, in order to overcome objections effectively,

  • it makes it much easier when you realize

  • there are only four kinds of objections,

  • and those are service, postponement, price, and personal.

  • And what I want to do now is I want to give you examples

  • of all these objections

  • and I'm going to give you an example

  • for each objection for the hiring authority,

  • as well as the candidate.

  • So let's start out with a service objection example.

  • A hiring authority could easily say,

  • "I don't need your help.

  • I can fill this job on my own.

  • I don't want to take the time

  • of seeing all the candidates you have.

  • I can just do a better job."

  • The way to effectively overcome that is,

  • "But what I can do is save you time and money.

  • And understand something, we'll interview many candidates.

  • We're not going to waste your time interviewing anybody.

  • That's my job.

  • Let me interview all the people

  • that have the skills and stability

  • and experience you're looking for.

  • I'm only going to present the finalist.

  • When I call you and present somebody to you,

  • they can do the job.

  • Now we have to see if the two of you click

  • and if they fit in with the company culture of our company,

  • as well as your department."

  • Now, a candidate objection could be,

  • "I'd rather submit my resume directly to the person

  • who would be my boss.

  • Why do I need you to submit my resume?

  • I want to work with the boss."

  • Now, a response to the candidate could be,

  • "We have many different positions available

  • in our company right now.

  • I need to determine what is most important to you.

  • You may send your resume to the wrong person.

  • They could look at it and say, 'This person is not a fit.'

  • I have the knowledge of every position

  • that our company has posted right now,

  • as well as some jobs that are not posted.

  • And so once I know what is most important to you,

  • then I will only present you with the best positions,

  • and I'll make sure that your resume gets in the hand

  • of the right hiring authority."

  • The second type of objection

  • I want to give you an example of are postponement objections.

  • So what type of postponement objection might you get

  • from a hiring authority?

  • The most common is, "I don't have time to interview.

  • I'm too busy.

  • I just don't have time for this.

  • I don't even know if I'm going to fill the job.

  • I just am too busy."

  • And your response can be,

  • "Well, the initial interviews will be done by HR.

  • We're only going to send you people

  • when it's most convenient for you.

  • And what I have to ask you

  • is what is your target date to fill?"

  • Because see, remember in recruiting, timing is everything.

  • And if they truly are too busy,

  • if they're traveling and don't have time to interview,

  • you have to know that.

  • But in order to get a target date,

  • ask them an additional question.

  • "What problem is this opening causing you

  • or your department?"

  • See, if there is no problem, if there is no challenge,

  • if they've got another employee covering the job,

  • they're going to save that salary for awhile.

  • But if I'm a hiring authority

  • and I have somebody doing two jobs,

  • and now they're threatening to quit."

  • "I'm doing the jobs of two people,

  • I'm not going to do that much longer."

  • Now that target date is going to get much more valid

  • because I know I've got somebody on the verge of quitting.

  • So when they're trying to postpone,

  • you've got to know what is that target day to fill in?

  • What problem exists as a result of the job being open?

  • No problem, no urgency.

  • If there is a problem,

  • this is where you want to put your time

  • and show the hiring authority

  • why they need to use you now.

  • Now let's go to the candidate side

  • of this postponement objection.

  • Often they'll just say, "Send me the specs.

  • Send me the job that you're representing,

  • and I'll decide if it's something I want to look at or not."

  • Your response has to be,

  • "We have numerous positions.

  • I'm not sure what's most important to you.

  • I'm not going to assume for a minute

  • that what your resume shows me is what you've done

  • and what you're currently doing.

  • It doesn't show me what you want to do next.

  • See, I'd like to become your lifetime talent agent.

  • I'd love to help you get

  • to where you want to be in five years,

  • but I don't know what position

  • is going to lead you up to that.

  • So once I find out what's most important to you,

  • then we'll know what job to key in on,

  • rather than just sending you specs."

  • Now let's go to price objection examples,

  • which is a third type of objection.

  • A hiring authority could say, "You know what?

  • I'm not going to use you

  • because every candidate you present to me

  • is at the top of our salary range.

  • And quite frankly, I can do better on my own.

  • I can find people that aren't making as much money."

  • Your response to this hiring authority could be,

  • "You know what I need to determine?

  • I need to determine what you prefer to offer."

  • Often hiring authorities will give a recruiter a range,

  • like, "I want to pay 80 to 110."

  • And so you're going to present candidates

  • in that whole range,

  • but often the best candidates for the job are the ones

  • that are higher paid.

  • So that's the reason that often you're going to present people

  • at the top of the salary level.

  • It's important to research

  • and find out what the past employee in that job was earning,

  • because it's very rare

  • that a hiring authority is going to want to offer a new person

  • more than the person that left the job,

  • unless there's added responsibility,

  • or maybe that person's been in the job for 15 or 20 years

  • so they're not making a competitive salary.

  • When you stay with the company longer than 10 years,

  • 15 years, you're making less money

  • than if you would change your job every 2 or 3 years,

  • because with every change, your money escalates.

  • So if they gave you that range,

  • what you have to say to your hiring authorities,

  • "Just tell me what you prefer to offer.

  • Rather than giving me a range of 80 to 110,

  • where do you really want us to focus?"

  • And they might say 90.

  • See, that's a much different recruit on your part

  • than if you think the salary goes up to 110.

  • And you and I both know

  • that money causes many offers to be denied,

  • and that's why we have to know upfront,

  • what does this hiring authority really want to offer?