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  • Alright guys, welcome to my 2022 philosopher tier list ranking.

  • There are 37 thinkers on this list, and before I start, I gotta mention some things.

  • 1.

  • This list is purely subjective.

  • I'm ranking these philosophers based on the impression they made on me, as measured

  • by this point in time.

  • And to be honest with you, on different days, some might move up, some might move down.

  • This is just for fun.

  • 2.

  • Some of these guys are not exactly philosophers.

  • I'm using the term 'philosopher' loosely here.

  • There are some literary figures in here as well.

  • 3.

  • All of these thinkers are great in their own way.

  • They all taught me something important, and I can easily see how someone that I rank in

  • the 'F tier', someone else might put in the 'S tier'.

  • So with all of that out of the way, let's get right into it.

  • Socrates:

  • To me, Socrates lived a life devoted to truthno matter what the cost was.

  • He teaches me the importance of living a life of authenticity and honesty, as opposed to

  • one where you cling to security.

  • He demonstrates that philosophy is not about what you read or write.

  • It's not simply an intellectual pursuit.

  • It's about how you live and relate to the world around you.

  • S-tier.

  • Friedrich Nietzsche:

  • If you just look at the videos on my channel, you already know the impact Nietzsche had

  • on me.

  • From him, I learned the importance of constantly overcoming myself, of challenging myself to

  • constantly grow and expand.

  • He taught me to conceptualize suffering as something that brings greatness, and the lack

  • of suffering as something that causes one to decay and degenerate.

  • His formula for greatness is 'amor fati', which means to love your fate.

  • And by trying to apply this to my life, by trying to accept and love everything that's

  • necessary, I feel like I've grown a lot as a person.

  • He also taught me how people use morality to try and control you, the importance of

  • authenticity, and the value of not being resentful.

  • On top of that, I find his writings to be very beautiful and concise.

  • A-Tier.

  • Fyodor Dostoevsky:

  • So this one will probably be controversial.

  • I think there are a lot of people who would probably put Dostoevsky in A-Tier, but he

  • just hasn't been as influential as Nietzsche to me, so I had to put him down one tier.

  • Out of all his books, the one most impactful to me is The Brothers Karamazov.

  • From it, I learned the importance of never lying to yourself, faith, and love.

  • He taught me that, because we are all connected, we are all responsible for all the evils in

  • the world, and through love, we can lessen suffering in the world.

  • And by becoming someone who plants good seeds in others, we can be a force for good in this

  • world.

  • B-Tier.

  • Seneca:

  • Seneca is probably one of the first stoics I read.

  • His writings are simple, beautiful, and helped me get more into philosophy, but they're

  • not super impactful to me these days.

  • Somethings he taught me are: - anger is never a good thing as it's just

  • not effective - a good life is one in which you are present

  • and making memories you won't regret, not fearing the future

  • - and that a mind that learns to desire only what is necessary can lead a life of peace,

  • but a mind that desires excess will never be satisfied.

  • C-Tier.

  • George Orwell:

  • So Orwell wrote one of my favourite novels: 1984.

  • In it, he shows what a totalitarian state looks and feels like.

  • He taught me a few things: 1.

  • totalitarianism is what happens when people give up responsibility for their own thoughts,

  • abandon truth, and value security and comfort over their own authenticity.

  • 2.

  • The totalitarian's main weapons are violence and indoctrination, but mainly indoctrination.

  • 3.

  • Indoctrination happens when someone positions themselves as the source of truth in your

  • life, isolates you from others, and then feeds you propaganda.

  • D-Tier.

  • Niccolo Machiavelli:

  • So I've only read The Prince by Machiavelli.

  • I think he overvalues rationality and the things he knows, as opposed to living a life

  • in relation to what he doesn't know.

  • To me, he is the archetype of a cold-calculating, overly-rational man.

  • But to be honest, this could be completely wrong as I don't have that much experience

  • with, nor interest in, Machiavelli.

  • E-Tier.

  • Sun-Tzu:

  • Honestly, I've only read The Art of War.

  • I enjoyed it and even made a video on it, but I honestly just don't think about it

  • that much.

  • That's the only reason I'm putting Sun Tzu in F-Tier for me, and I fully acknowledge

  • that someone else might put him in S-Tier.

  • He just didn't leave that big of an impression on me.

  • F-Tier.

  • Diogenes:

  • To me, Diogenes was the living embodiment of minimalism.

  • He demonstrated a life devoted to just the necessities.

  • He showed me that we can achieve greatness through simplicity and that we could survive

  • with so much less than we think we need.

  • He motivates me to cut out all the extra bs from my life and to focus only on what's

  • necessary.

  • S-Tier.

  • Aristotle:

  • Aristotle's ideas of deductive and inductive reasoning, making art and speaking effectively,

  • walking 'the middle path' or in accordance with 'the golden mean', and his ideas

  • on God as theunmoved-moverare all things I think about on a daily basis.

  • A-Tier.

  • Alexander Solzhenitsyn:

  • In 1945, after writing a letter criticizing Joseph Stalin, Solzhenitsyn was arrested and

  • spent eight years in Russian prison and labour camps.

  • And after that, he was forced to spend three more years in exile.

  • Through his work The Gulag Archipelago, he taught my the importance of taking full responsibility

  • for your life and its outcomes, figuring out and correcting your own errors, and the danger

  • of valuing comfort over truth.

  • B-Tier.

  • Thomas Kuhn:

  • So Thomas Kuhn is probably not as well-known as some of the other philosophers on here,

  • but he was a philosopher of science.

  • His book 'The Structure of Scientific Revolutions' is about exactly what is sounds like: the

  • structure of scientific revolutions.

  • But don't let the boring title confuse you.

  • To me, it's more like a description of how our minds learn and evolve, and for that reason,

  • it's been pretty impactful on me.

  • If you want to improve yourself, you have to know how to change your mind, and if you

  • wanna know how to change your mind, I definitely recommend reading that book.

  • C-Tier.

  • Jordan Peterson:

  • So Jordan Peterson was a gateway thinker for me.

  • There are many people on this list who I'm not sure I would have ever read if it weren't

  • for him.

  • So he kind of holds a special place in my heart.

  • Although I know some might rank him higher or loweror maybe not even put him on the

  • list at all.

  • Personally, I do think he's one of the most influential thinkers alive right now, and

  • I've enjoyed his body of working from the 12 rules books, to maps of meaning, to his

  • lectures on genesis.

  • I don't think I would have ever read the bible if it wasn't for him, and I do hope

  • he does his lectures on exodus at some point.

  • Unfortunately, unlike other thinkers on this list, I don't think Dr. Peterson has formulated

  • many original concepts, like Freud, Nietzsche or Jung, but I don't necessarily know if

  • he's even trying to do that either.

  • Overall, I really enjoy his stuff and hope to see him do more in the future.

  • D-Tier.

  • Carl Jung:

  • So this one will probably be controversial.

  • I've read a few of Jung's books now, and none of them have really spoken to me.

  • I just don't think he writes as well as Freud or Nietzsche, and I just haven't found

  • his concepts that compelling personally.

  • I don't think about them that often.

  • I think because I read Nietzsche before Jung, a lot of the things people find compelling

  • in Jung, such as individuation and the shadow, were not as groundbreaking to me as they might

  • have been to others.

  • I feel like I got variations of those ideas through Nietzsche.

  • But it's possible that I just haven't been moved by Jung yet, or maybe the time

  • for me to read him just hasn't arrive yet, so maybe I'll change my mind on him in the

  • future.

  • E-Tier.

  • Voltaire:

  • I don't have much to say about Voltaire.

  • I thought Candide was an OK book, but other than that, I'm not too familiar with his

  • works.

  • Candide was not good enough or compelling enough for me to want to explore him further.

  • But I'm open to any recommendations you guys might have that could change my mind.

  • F-Tier.

  • Marcus Aurelius:

  • So to me, Marcus Aurelius is the living embodiment of a good leader.

  • He achieved the heights of power and remained just, humble, and devoted to truth and the

  • good life.

  • He reminds me that power doesn't have to corrupt you, and that a truly great man keeps

  • his feet firmly on the ground, regardless of how powerful he gets.

  • If anything, he reminds me of the importance of keeping yourself grounded.

  • His Meditations is one of those books I can read anytime I need to ground my mind and

  • nourish my spirit.

  • S-Tier.

  • Jiddu Krishnamurti:

  • Krishnamurti is probably lesser known than other philosophers on this list, but he had

  • a huge effect on me personally.

  • His teachings taught me to