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  • - Imagine a future

  • where your workplace is virtual.

  • You don't need a big screen display

  • because you can put virtual monitors anywhere.

  • Instead of a set of Zoom squares,

  • you can meet your colleagues in a virtual beach side resort

  • where your avatars will reflect your real face.

  • It can feel just like coming into the office

  • but from the comfort of your home.

  • - And then I've lost my hands again.

  • Hey, I got my hands back.

  • (Nilay laughs)

  • I'm gonna be honest with you, Adi.

  • I hate this.

  • I hate it more than anything.

  • - I feel so beaten down by the software.

  • The Meta Quest Pro is supposed to be a big leap forward

  • for the company, formerly known as Facebook.

  • Meta has lost 9.4 billion this year

  • on virtual and augmented reality,

  • or the so-called metaverse.

  • And since we started recording this video,

  • Meta's laid off 11,000 employees or 13% of its workforce.

  • But in his address to the company,

  • Zuckerberg said he's still focusing

  • on high priority growth areas like the Metaverse.

  • It's betting everything, right down to its name.

  • This is where Meta's VR goes from fun and games

  • to a serious business tool.

  • Eventually, CEO Mark Zuckerberg

  • wants something like the Quest Pro

  • to be your next laptop.

  • The Quest Pro is like a very fancy version of the Quest Two,

  • the all in one headset that Meta released in 2020.

  • Like the Quest Two, the Quest Pro is a self-contained system

  • with built-in cameras and tracking.

  • It supports Quest Two apps and games

  • and it uses the same app store.

  • You still need a Meta account to start using it

  • unless your workplace sets up its own login system.

  • Most of it's internal specs

  • have gotten a slight bump though.

  • It uses a new Qualcomm XR Two Plus chip set

  • instead of the Quest Two's XR Two

  • and it's got 12 gigabytes of memory

  • instead of six gigabytes.

  • The Quest Two controllers featured LED bands

  • that the headsets built-in cameras could track.

  • Now the controllers have their own tracking camera.

  • I haven't noticed a huge improvement in their accuracy

  • mostly because the Quest Two was already quite good

  • but they're more compact and they finally charge

  • on a little plastic dock with the headset

  • instead of burning through AA batteries.

  • Where the Quest Two blocked out

  • most of the light around your face,

  • the Quest Pro offers more options.

  • By default, it lets in a lot of light

  • so people can't, say sneak up on you and surprise you in VR.

  • You'd be surprised how often that happens.

  • But it comes with rubber wings

  • that you can magnetically snap on

  • to block your peripheral vision

  • and you can buy a separate full face mask

  • that shuts out almost all light.

  • The default option here is okay

  • if you're sitting still at a desk,

  • which is how Meta imagines many people using it.

  • But it made me motion sick for anything else

  • even typically comfortable games like Beat Saber.

  • So I appreciate the flexibility

  • but I spent almost all my time with those wings on.

  • The main difference here though is the headsets cameras.

  • The Quest Two has four tracking cameras, one on each corner

  • and they capture black and white video.

  • The Quest Pro has a total of 10 sensors

  • including outward facing color cameras

  • and internal ones that capture your eyes and face.

  • All these cameras enable the Quest Pro's

  • two big selling points.

  • The first is color passthrough mixed reality,

  • a midpoint between full immersive VR and AR glasses,

  • where virtual items are overlaid on a live video feed.

  • We couldn't directly film past their video.

  • Meta says support to capture it

  • is coming in future software updates.

  • The second is face and eye tracking

  • which lets an avatar mirror facial expressions

  • like smiling and raising an eyebrow.

  • - You look like you're sleeping all the time.

  • - Yeah, no, it doesn't recognize that my eyes are open.

  • - Which is weird.

  • (Nilay laughs)

  • Okay, there is something to be said about this experience.

  • - Eye tracking also allows foveated rendering

  • where software can render the pixels

  • right where you're looking at more sharply

  • saving on computing power.

  • These are interesting new features

  • but so far there isn't a lot to do with them.

  • Foveated rendering could make more demanding games

  • render with more detail

  • but the Quest Pro isn't meant for games right now.

  • So most VR developers will be building for the Quest Two.

  • The color feed is a step up

  • from the Quest Two's black and white,

  • but it's still washed out and flickery,

  • a long way from looking like the real world.

  • There are some mixed reality apps

  • but the mixed reality component often remains pretty basic.

  • Meanwhile, Meta's main use for eye and face tracking

  • is its own social platforms,

  • particularly Horizon Workrooms.

  • Workrooms is at the heart of Meta's new strategy.

  • It's an app that you can sync

  • with a desktop computer to use as an office.

  • For personal work, you can project big screens

  • in front of your face on top of either a full VR environment

  • or a pass through video feed.

  • For collaboration, you can invite other people

  • to a virtual meeting room

  • but Workrooms, it has some problems.

  • - So this is the first time

  • we've been able to make Horizon Workrooms work.

  • We've tried it many times.

  • It has mostly failed out, but here we are together.

  • - I would like to caveat

  • that there's supposed to be a third person here with us

  • so I'm not sure I would say worked.

  • - That's true.

  • Alex Heath was unable to join us.

  • The face tracking is somewhat working.

  • Adi looks very sleepy all the time.

  • I am talking with my hands. - The face tracking

  • is also better than I expected,

  • even though it's not great in a lot of ways.

  • - Yeah, but it's like it's on the curve

  • so it's not good enough

  • that you are not talking with your hands.

  • Like I'm overcompensating with my hands.

  • - Yes.

  • - [Nilay] I cannot tell what your face is actually doing

  • because you keep winking and squinting at me.

  • - Yes.

  • I don't know, maybe this just exaggerates

  • all of our normal expressions

  • so we can see how weird we look all the time.

  • I don't know.

  • These are thoughts that I feel like would be weird

  • for a work meeting, so...

  • - There is zero chance that I would ever

  • make a serious decision in this software.

  • - It is bizarre that I have,

  • bizarre that I have for years

  • been connecting my Meta headset

  • to things related to Facebook

  • so that I can have a seamless social experience

  • so that I can have like, oh, isn't it great

  • that you can take advantage of the social graph?

  • I have to go to a website,

  • log in through an arcane-like authentication system

  • that even I don't understand where my account is.

  • I get on the web, I create a meeting room

  • I invite people to the meeting room through,

  • similarly I have no idea how or where

  • or where these accounts are.

  • And then maybe, maybe they get a link

  • and then they can click on the link

  • and then they launch themselves into the headset

  • and maybe it works.

  • As I said before, the Quest Pro's focus

  • is business collaboration.

  • So we're spending our most of our time

  • in Meta's Workrooms app

  • but the social app, Horizon Worlds

  • is a big part of Meta's metaverse strategy

  • a free VR platform for games, events and social hangouts.