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  • Hey ha ha ha laughter is the best medicine.

  • Okay.

  • Hi James Ming vid.

  • Today we're going to work on medical words and phrases that people use in business and casual conversation.

  • What we're going to do is have a special lesson or I have a special lesson for you.

  • We're going to work on your listening.

  • Okay.

  • And that's this.

  • You're listening.

  • Your vocabulary and your comprehension.

  • And how am I going to do that?

  • We're gonna start this video off with me not being here.

  • I'll just be telling you a story and you'll work on your listening.

  • Listen for the words you don't know when we come back.

  • I will teach you the vocabulary that you probably don't know because especially picked it for you and then I'll disappear again and we'll work on comprehension by reading the story again for you to see what you understand and how much you comprehend.

  • Pretty cool.

  • Huh?

  • Okay so for this we're going to require two things.

  • One please get a pen and paper.

  • If you can if you can't don't worry about it just pay attention to see what you don't know because of course I will be teaching the vocabulary And number two I need you to be I need you to be prepared because we're about to start.

  • Are you ready?

  • Let's go.

  • Okay guys.

  • Yeah.

  • Bit weird.

  • I'm not here but you're listening to my voice.

  • I asked you to do this specifically because when our eyes are closed or we can't see we get to use our listening facilities and they work much better.

  • So I'm gonna start the story.

  • Listen carefully.

  • Mr re get in here.

  • Yes boss who's running the Washington operation Donny T.

  • Sir it's hemorrhaging more money than we can afford.

  • You're right boss.

  • We can't use a band aid solution to solve this problem.

  • What's your solution?

  • Mystery?

  • Sugar?

  • Donny?

  • T needs to use a dog.

  • A dose of strong medicine for the company or it'll be a D.

  • O.

  • A.

  • When november comes around.

  • Okay talk to Donny T.

  • And I want you to check up on him by the end of the week.

  • Okay boss.

  • Alrighty and we're back So we did the listening portion of our L.

  • V.

  • L.

  • V.

  • C.

  • Class and now we're going to do the vocabulary and phrases, verbs and idioms.

  • Okay so I'm going to explain them now and then afterwards we're going to well you'll be listening to the story again and see how much you can get for comprehension.

  • You ready?

  • Let's go to the board.

  • So the first one we're going to do and the first one we talked about was operation.

  • Now this is going to be a bit complicated so I'm gonna take my time on it.

  • The condition of functioning or being active.

  • It just means doing something.

  • So when there's a business operation it means they are active doing business.

  • A military operation.

  • They are active with the military.

  • Okay now when we talk about medicine because I did say this is or these are phrases idioms and vocabulary that are used in medicine.

  • But people in business have adopted them or taken them, I'm gonna also tell you what it is in the medical sense because who knows?

  • Maybe you're watching the medical tv.

  • Right?

  • So that's surgery on a patient.

  • And that's when the doctor is cutting the patient and I'm not eating steak, they cut the patient open maybe hard.

  • So that's it.

  • And you can see how these go together because they're being active in surgery on the patient.

  • Next one, hemorrhage.

  • Now, hemoglobin, chemo is right there.

  • Blood.

  • So when you have a hemorrhage, it means the blood is being lost.

  • It's usually from a blood vessel.

  • And that might be complicated.

  • So we'll just say something cuts you and a lot of blood is coming out.

  • You're hemorrhaging.

  • But you can also hemorrhage inside the body, which means something breaks inside you.

  • And lots of blood is coming out but not outside your body is inside of you.

  • So, you might see something coming out like that and it's hemorrhaging.

  • Ok.

  • So what does that mean?

  • Well, the blood isn't supposed to do that.

  • It's supposed to say where it is.

  • So my blood comes here to my heart.

  • It shouldn't all come over here.

  • That's a loss of blood.

  • Especially when it's a lot of a lot of loss of blood then we call it a hemorrhage.

  • Now, when a company is losing money, they say they're hemorrhaging money.

  • Why you might say well blood is one of the most important liquids in our body.

  • If you lose a lot of blood, you will die.

  • If a company hemorrhages money it will die.

  • So you can understand why they took this word from the medical profession because it makes sense.

  • It's the lifeblood of a company, right?

  • Life blood money.

  • Next Band Aid, Band Aid is a brand, it's like tissue or Kleenex in Canada and America.

  • Kleenex is the name of something you blow your nose in but it's a company, it's not the product.

  • The product is a tissue.

  • So Band Aid is this thing that you know when you get a cut on your finger, you put it on your finger to stop the blood.

  • Now it's not for big cuts.

  • So if you have your arm is cut off, you can't use a Band aid.

  • It's a temporary solution for a small cut.

  • So Band aid is a brand of bandage used to cover cuts for business.

  • A Band Aid is a temporary solution.

  • What that means is they have a problem.

  • They don't know how to fix the problem yet, but they will do something small for now.

  • So it won't be so bad.

  • So they call them Band Aid solutions.

  • And if you have a problem still with the word solution.

  • Look it's our next word.

  • Alright, so in the hospital a solution is a mixture, it's a liquid mixture where they put two things together to create something new.

  • Okay so you got this and this and I'm gonna use the word saline.

  • So if somebody is a bit sick in the hospital and they their blood their blood salt is low well you don't want to give them too much salt that might kill them and you don't want to give them too much water that might kill them.

  • So they make a solution to solve the problem, they mix salt and water so the person can get what they need and this solves the problem or a difficult situation for the body.

  • Now when we have a solution in business it's a way of dealing with a difficult situation if you have a problem that's okay like I've got is it is a small problem, not a problem.

  • I don't need a solution for this but when you need money because your business is hemorrhaging money you need a solution.

  • It's a difficult situation and you need something to fix it.

  • Okay dose well the doses a quantity of drug or medicine that is given at a specific time mm Well when you go to your doctor and he gives you medicine he might say to you or she might say to you take this medicine three times a day, take two pills three times a day.

  • So that's a quantity of medicine and they will tell you how much you need to take at what specific time.

  • Okay so if you need a dose of medicine in the business you need to have some kind of medicine or solution that you have to use at a given time.

  • Next D.

  • O.

  • A.

  • What's that?

  • D.

  • O.

  • A.

  • As an acronym for dead on admittance or dead on arrival.

  • Well not much more to explain to it.

  • Then when you go to the hospital, if you're dead they will say well because at hospitals you get admitted right you go to a hospital in north America.

  • They admit you you don't just go in and go to a doctor.

  • You have to be admitted let in.

  • So if they say dead on admittance it means you came in.

  • They got the paperwork and went he's dead.

  • He was dead when he got here meaning this is important for the hospital.

  • You they didn't do anything wrong.

  • You were dead when you came.

  • So they didn't kill you.

  • Oh.

  • Oh but in business if something is dead on arrival it means you never had a chance to get it done.

  • Let's say you want to do a business deal with somebody but they don't like it as soon as you mentioned.

  • No sorry.

  • We're not doing this is dead on arrival.

  • They might not even let you speak.

  • Maybe it's dead on arrival because I don't have the money to do the business with you.

  • Or maybe they don't like the company you work for.

  • So they say as long as that company is working on the contract, this contract will be dead on arrival.

  • Will never say yes to it.

  • Okay.

  • D.

  • O.

  • A.

  • Now I have two words and they're similar checkup checkup pronunciations the same little different meanings.

  • So I'll explain check up.

  • This is a when it's one word together it's a proper examination.

  • Usually medical, you go for a medical checkup and the A.

  • Or the tells you.

  • It's a noun.

  • So the word is together to make it a checkup.

  • I need a dental checkup next week.

  • Right?

  • But when you have a separation between the two it's a phrase a verb and it means to check on someone.

  • I need to check up on the situation to check up on someone or something.

  • Right?

  • So if you take your car to a garage and it's broken, you might call the mechanic three hours later to check up on what's happening with the car to check to see and investigate what is happening.

  • Cool.