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  • Welcome back to another edition of Speak English fluently.

  • I am your host Steve Hatherly and I thank you, uh, very much for joining us once again.

  • I’m very excited today because my guest is the owner and operator of her very own

  • YouTube channel.

  • It's called Arnel’s Everyday English.

  • Which offers English lessons for ESL and EFL students.

  • She is from the United States originally.

  • But she has been living in the U.K… living and working for the last 11 years.

  • Her channel is extremely popular 497,000 subscribers.

  • And that's just the last time I checked.

  • So I’m sure the number is even higher now.

  • The channel keeps her very busy, as does her regular teaching job, as does her family life

  • at home.

  • And, therefore, I thank her very much for joining me today.

  • Arnel, welcome.

  • And it's so nice to meet you and have you here.

  • Thank you, Steve.

  • I love that introduction.

  • And I’m really excited to be here as well.

  • Well I think we're finished then.

  • We got a good introduction.

  • We can just we can just end there.

  • Yeah, goodbye.

  • Goodbye.

  • Well, let's talk about you before we talk about your channel and the details of your

  • work and all of those things.

  • So you're from the United States originally.

  • Which part?

  • I was born in Arizona.

  • Very nice.

  • Arizona.

  • But I left when I was six months old because of my dad's job.

  • I traveled everywhere.

  • So I left the U.S. when I was seven.

  • I left when I was seven and I haven't lived there since, oh wow, um, yes, I’ve been,

  • where did I live?

  • I lived in Korea.

  • I lived in, um, South Korea for one year.

  • And then Germany for 10 years.

  • And then the Netherlands for four years.

  • And I’ve been in the U.K. for 12 years.

  • Goodness me.

  • Oh, I apologize.

  • It's been 12 years now, not 11 in the U.K.

  • You truly areyou truly are a citizen of the world then.

  • I am...

  • I am but I still have my family in the States.

  • And I like to go back and visit them, um, from time to time when I can.

  • But, yeah, I’ve been in the U.K.

  • Do you travel to China or Korea much at all?

  • Because I was reading in your bio, and you told me before we got started today, you get

  • this question a lot about your ethnicity.

  • You're American but you're also a mix of Chinese and Korean.

  • So you visit the States.

  • Do you also visit China and Korea too?

  • Yes, lots of people ask me where I’m from.

  • So my dad - he's American.

  • My dad's American - my mom is Chinese-Korean, um, so I… the last time I was in Korea was

  • 2014.

  • Okay, so, no, I don't visit Korea often but I do have relatives in Korea.

  • I don't have relatives in China.

  • But my Chinese relatives are living in Taiwan.

  • Oh, I see.

  • And also, it will be a much further trip for you to come visit this part of the world than

  • it would be to get to the United States.

  • I suppose yesyes and, um, I have three little kids, Steve, so I think any parent

  • knows traveling with kids is no fun.

  • So how

  • how old are your children?

  • My son is eight.

  • I have one son he's eight.

  • And then I have twin daughters.

  • Twin daughters!

  • They are five.

  • Oh, my goodness!

  • Where do you find the time to do all of this YouTube work plus your regular job?

  • That's a good question yeah, um, I eat coffeecoffee is my answer.

  • I think a lot of my followers know I love coffee.

  • I need several strong coffees a day to keep me going.

  • But not after 3 p.m.

  • I learned that from watching one of your videos.

  • Yes, exactly.

  • Otherwise, I can't sleep that

  • I’m jittery the whole day.

  • Um, and I didn't have coffee before this interview Steve just to calm my nerves.

  • So you know before this interview, if you pass out halfway through, then we will understand.

  • So let's talk about your career then.

  • Um, when did you get into teaching?

  • Is it something that you transitioned into or has this been your thing since the beginning

  • of your career?

  • No, um, so I told you I lived in the Netherlands for four years and that's where I did university.

  • And I, um, was originally a dancer.

  • Oh, wow.

  • Yeah, I don't think anyone knows that, so this is the first time

  • I’m…

  • I’m kind of announcing that.

  • Um, I trained as a dancer professionally since I was 13.

  • And then, um, I went to university for dance.

  • So my bachelor is in contemporary dance.

  • So what kind of dance were you doing in your university studies?

  • Um, well we had ballet training every day but it I specialized in modern dance.

  • And it's kind of hard to explain modern dance.

  • Um, I wish I had a clip to show you on my phone.

  • I could show you a modern dance but you can Google it.

  • Everyone can google modern dance.

  • So the plan was then, in your younger years, to pursue dance professionally obviously,

  • so when did that decision come to, kind of give up on that part of your life?

  • Ifif in fact you did, and transitionand transition into this part?

  • Well I graduated, um, from uni in 2010.

  • And to be honest, I had been dancing for such a long time that I was burnt out.

  • So I didn't want to dance anymore.

  • I was burnt out by I guess thethe dance world.

  • I could describe it like that.

  • I was really burnt out.

  • I didn't want to keep going so I thought I’m going to travel.

  • And I think, as you know, a lot of people who travel, they also teach English.

  • Sure.

  • And I thought I can't just be a native speaker and teach English.

  • I have to, um, get some training, I have to learn how to be a teacher so, um, at this

  • point, I was in the U.K. and I decided to do my, um, TESOL training.

  • And from there, I never traveled because what happened.

  • The school that you got your TESOL training from is the school that you started to work

  • at correct?

  • Correct, yes.

  • Thank you.

  • Thank you for reminding me.

  • I remember my own I read.

  • I read that bio very carefully.

  • Yeah, I…

  • I completely forgot, so keep reminding me.

  • Um, because I couldn't forget, um, yes at first it wasn't a, um, how did I start?

  • I think I first started out by doing the summer school.

  • It's… a lot of junior students from Europe would come to England.

  • And I was a summer school teacher.

  • And from there, I…

  • my contract kept getting extended, um, you know six more weeks another six weeks.

  • Um, yeah so that's kind of how my teaching career started.

  • And it was, um, a wonderful learning experience.

  • I think all, um, teachers and newly qualified teachers know when you're first starting out,

  • it's stressful.

  • It's stressful walking to a classroom with, you know, 15 students.

  • But that was good for me.

  • It really helped me, um, help me progress.

  • A lot of new teachers perhaps don't realize, and maybe even a lot of students don't realize,

  • that teaching there's… there's a large performance element to teaching and that's difficult to

  • get used to in the beginning.

  • Right, yes, um, I remember the very first lesson I taught.

  • So when you do your TESOL training, on day one, you have to teach.

  • I had no teaching experience and I remember very clearly how to teach the weather.

  • And I was so flustered.

  • I was speaking really quickly and I was writing on the board and I was just talking.

  • And I think I kept getting

  • well the students were just staring at me.

  • They all had blank expression because I was speaking too quickly and, um, I was so nervous

  • and that made me even more nervous.

  • So I would say my very first day in the classroom is not something I want to remember.

  • I can remember my first day on the radio and I, uh, I don't look fondly upon that experience

  • either.

  • So I completely understand what you're saying.

  • Yeahyeah and I remember afterwards, I got some feedback from one of the professional

  • teachers and he said I really liked how he used two colors on the board.

  • So I used one red pen and one green pen.

  • And I said, “Oh, thank you,” but I actually didn't know I was doing that.

  • It was

  • I was like, yes I planned

  • I plan to use two colors, but in fact I was just so nervous I was using random pens in

  • my first class.

  • That's funny.

  • Yeah, so how long were you a teacher than before you decided to go the YouTube route?

  • Um, seven eight years.

  • Oh, wow, okay.

  • So it had been a while?

  • Yeahyeah, and I originally, um, did not want to start a YouTube channel because I’m,

  • um, a pretty private person.