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  • "Working out tones your muscles."

  • [laughs]

  • I can't even say that with a straight face.

  • "The best way to burn fat is on an empty stomach."

  • Yeah, go ahead and crinkle that up

  • and throw that one away as well.

  • "Running will destroy your knees."

  • Even though I hate running personally,

  • it will not destroy your knees.

  • My name is Dr. Stacie Morris.

  • I am the owner of The Physio Fix,

  • which is in Phoenix, Arizona.

  • I have been practicing physical therapy for six years now,

  • and my specialty is working in sports, but specifically

  • working with strength athletes and gymnasts.

  • Hi, my name is Dr. Wesley Wang.

  • I am a physical therapist, and I have been practicing

  • for about five and a half years now.

  • I personally specialize in ACLs

  • and working with high-school- and college-level athletes,

  • and I work at Healthy Baller.

  • Today, we're debunking fitness myths.

  • "Your knees should never pass your toes when squatting."

  • This is something that I maybe pushed a little bit

  • early in my career, when I didn't understand everything.

  • Morris: You should allow your body to move naturally,

  • and if you limit that, you actually add more stress,

  • as we've known through literature,

  • to your hips and your low back.

  • So to limit that movement is just absurd to me,

  • and I feel like that myth needs to die now.

  • Wang: You think about the daily things that we do.

  • Let's take away strength training.

  • Beyond that, you go down the stairs,

  • your knees go past your toes.

  • When you play your sport, do you ever

  • think about your knees being past your toes?

  • And the answer is 100% no.

  • And, Stacie, for you, you were a gymnast.

  • When you did your jumps and flips and landings,

  • I can guarantee you were never like,

  • "Oh, no, my knees cannot go past my toes."

  • You're absolutely correct.

  • So now we see so many ankle limitations

  • because of this movement pattern

  • that people have been spreading a myth

  • or trying to teach for the wrong reasons,

  • without letting them just move like athletes.

  • Let your body move natural,

  • and usually it does what it needs to do

  • to be most efficient at whatever movement that is.

  • "Soreness is a sign of a good workout."

  • Soreness is basically when you have an accumulation

  • of lactate in your blood.

  • It turns yourself into more of an acidic state,

  • and that's when you kind of feel that burn effect

  • that people talk about.

  • Is soreness a factor of a workout?

  • Yes, potentially.

  • Our patients, our athletes, have had plenty

  • of great workouts and not felt sore the next day. Right?

  • It's just the way the body is, and sometimes

  • you just have a harder workout, a shorter workout.

  • So those 15-, 20-minute workouts,

  • those are the ones that typically

  • I don't personally feel too sore in,

  • but if I get, like, a nice hour-and-15 workout

  • where I'm just going hard at it,

  • then I'm going to feel a little bit more sore the next day.

  • But, again, that doesn't mean that my 20-minute workout

  • was ineffective or bad.

  • A lot of people, they're like, "I can barely walk,

  • I'm so sore."

  • And their trainer is like, "Good."

  • And I'm like, that's not so good!

  • You should be able to walk.

  • You should have been progressed in a way

  • that was so gradual that you are feeling stronger,

  • and maybe you are still getting a little bit sore,

  • but you don't feel like you can't walk the next day.

  • I think rest and recovery, nutrition,

  • sleep is super important.

  • "Bigger muscles are stronger."

  • From a physiology standpoint,

  • bigger muscles may have the ability to be stronger.

  • They could have bigger or more motor units

  • to be able to get stronger.

  • But that doesn't necessarily mean that they are stronger.

  • There are people that have genetic differences,

  • they have longer muscles,

  • and they're not going to be as short or as prominent.

  • So they maybe don't look as big,

  • but they may be really, really strong

  • because there's more of them

  • and there's a shorter tendon where they're attaching.

  • Or, there's people that have different limb lengths.

  • Your levers are going to play into how strong you are.

  • I do talk about size,

  • because obviously dealing with the rehab side of things

  • they have a post-op knee that looks like

  • half the size of the other side, but I'm never like,

  • "Oh, you're weak because you look like this."

  • It's just, "Hey, let's get in the weight room,

  • let's get a little bit stronger,

  • let's make sure you can

  • perform your sport safely, confidently,"

  • and all that kind of stuff.

  • And for me, that's all I really care about,

  • is more the performance side of things,

  • and getting stronger is going to help you

  • in your performance level, for the most part.

  • "You need to eat meat to build muscle."

  • [laughs] Your eyes got big there.

  • Definitely not.

  • Morris: You do need to eat protein to build muscle,

  • but you do not need to get your protein

  • from meat sources only.

  • They have vegan protein shakes.

  • You can do lentils.

  • Even quinoa has protein in it.

  • Wang: "Cardio before weights."

  • What are your thoughts?

  • So, it depends on your goals.

  • Are your goals cardiovascular-related,

  • or are your goals strength-related?

  • I think that that thing needs to be first.

  • So if you're a strength athlete,

  • you definitely need to make sure that

  • you're focusing on what's important,

  • which is your strength training.

  • Wang: And this is not a black and white thing,

  • just like a lot of things in the fitness world

  • and rehab world that we work with.

  • Morris: Cardio doesn't have to be what you think it is.

  • It doesn't have to be biking or running or swimming.

  • I do weightlifting as a form of cardio

  • because I get my heart rate up

  • and then I'm able to sustain that,

  • and that alone is cardiovascular work.

  • "Working out tones your muscles."

  • [laughs]

  • I can't even say that with a straight face,

  • because what is toning?

  • I think of toning as something a printer does.

  • I think when people think of tone,

  • they think of seeing their muscles and it being visible,

  • and it always comes down to calories in versus calories out.

  • And being able to see your muscles means that you probably

  • are in a caloric maintenance or deficit state,

  • so you've got to make sure you're really focusing

  • on what you're eating too,

  • not just focusing on what you're doing in the gym.

  • There are plenty of runners out there who dread lifting,

  • but they're still considered on the toner side.

  • And that's where the word tone is very, very subjective.

  • But there are other people who are on the more

  • strength-conditioning side who love to lift

  • and are also toned.

  • So, again, that's where the individuality

  • really needs to come into play here.

  • Absolutely. It's all going back to their goals.

  • What are your goals?

  • And for me, my goals are not as much aesthetic anymore

  • as they are just feeling strong, being strong,

  • and being the best version of myself.

  • "Exercise cancels out unhealthy eating habits."

  • Definitely not. [laughs]

  • 100% not.

  • My sister used to say this all the time.

  • She'd be like, "I'm going to work out today

  • so I can go to McDonald's."

  • And I was like, "What?

  • If you're eating lots of saturated fats

  • and processed food, it's not good for you."