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  • Narrator: Every weekend, Samgeori Farms

  • in Damyang County, South Korea,

  • cooks 1,700 pounds of chicken and vegetables

  • inside of their 40 wood-fueled woks.

  • The final result: dakbokkeumtang,

  • a spicy chicken stew full of potatoes, onions, and carrots

  • and a secret chili sauce.

  • Narrator: We visited chef Kim Chun-gu

  • and his crew of 21 cooks to see what it takes

  • to make dakbokkeumtang in such big batches.

  • Cooking this dish begins at 9 a.m. on Saturday.

  • Workers coat the tops of 20-kilogram iron woks

  • with soybean oil and add handfuls of dried oak

  • into the base of the grills.

  • Narrator: When the grills are ready,

  • workers use propane torches to light the wood on fire.

  • After five minutes,

  • the woks reach their optimal temperature

  • and an entire bucket of the dakbokkeumtang mixture

  • is poured inside.

  • Narrator: While maintaining the wood fire is challenging,

  • it's worth the flavorful payoff.

  • Narrator: Oakwood has a smokier flavor

  • than apple and cherrywood,

  • with a lighter taste compared to hickory and mesquite woods.

  • It also burns at a high temperature

  • without emitting too much smoke.

  • Even though this dish is cooked on high heat,

  • it still takes a while to cook.

  • Narrator: Thinly cut onions are added into the wok

  • and cooked for a minute.

  • At 11 a.m., the first batch of dakbokkeumtang

  • is ready to be served.

  • Workers wheel the woks out to the customers' tables

  • and scoop the stew into metal bowls.

  • And a single order costs around $55.

  • Narrator: Samgeori Farms opened three years ago,

  • and since then, business has centered around one dish.

  • Preparing for a weekend of cooking

  • starts early in the morning,

  • cutting vegetables and chicken in the kitchen.

  • Narrator: The restaurant uses around 600 sweet potatoes,

  • potatoes, and carrots every weekend,

  • along with 1,000 green onions and onions.

  • Narrator: But the most important part of the dish

  • is the locally sourced chicken.

  • Narrator: Once the chicken and vegetables

  • have been chopped and added into the buckets,

  • it's time for the most important part of the dish,

  • the secret seasoning.

  • Narrator: The bright-red gochugaru and gochujang paste

  • help create the dish's signature color

  • and spicy red-pepper flavor,

  • while the red wine helps get rid of the meaty smell.

  • Narrator: Dakbokkeumtang has been a staple

  • of Korean cooking since the 20th century,

  • following the mass production of poultry in the country.

  • And while chicken might be a fairly new ingredient,

  • the famous red chili has been grown

  • and eaten in Korea for over 1,000 years.

  • The stew used to be called dakdoritang,

  • containing the Japanese word for chicken, dori.

  • The National Institute of Korean Language decided

  • to change it to dakbokkeumtang,

  • literally translating to "stir-fried chicken soup."

  • Today, it's typically served with white kimchi,

  • cucumber pickles, and chive pancakes.

  • And in some cases, there is a bonus at the end.

  • At Samgeori Farms, when most of the dish has been served,

  • the remaining sauce is pushed back

  • into the center of the wok.

  • Ramen noodles are added in and enjoyed,

  • so nothing goes to waste.

Narrator: Every weekend, Samgeori Farms

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