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  • Hi, Bob the Canadian here.

  • Welcome to this English lesson

  • where we're going to talk about

  • 10 very common English questions that English speakers

  • either use or hear as they go through their day.

  • The other week, I thought to myself

  • I should keep track of all the questions that I hear

  • and all the questions that I ask as I go through my day.

  • And I should turn it into an English lesson.

  • And this is it.

  • (upbeat music)

  • Question number one that I hear almost every day

  • is the question how did you sleep?

  • This is a question that you would hear at home.

  • It's a question that family members would ask of each other.

  • So a lot of times in the morning when I get up,

  • Jen will say to me, "Hey, how did you sleep?"

  • And I'll reply by saying, "Oh, I slept great."

  • Or, "I'm a little grouchy right now

  • because I didn't sleep very good at all."

  • And I will also ask Jen the same question.

  • I will ask my kids the same question as well.

  • How did you sleep?

  • It's just a nice way to start a conversation in the morning.

  • It kind of helps you get a sense

  • of what kind of mood the other person is in

  • before you start to talk to them about other things.

  • So question number one that I hear almost every day,

  • how did you sleep?

  • The second question is also a question

  • that you use in the home.

  • And it's a question that starts with have you seen my...

  • And then it might end with car keys or phone.

  • I'm guilty of asking this question quite a bit.

  • I'll say to Jen in the morning, "Have you seen my car keys?

  • Have you seen my phone?"

  • Notice I don't use this question.

  • I don't say where are my car keys or where is my phone?

  • Because when you use that question,

  • it almost implies that the other person

  • should know where they are.

  • So a polite way to ask about where something is

  • that you lost yourself is to use that phrasing.

  • Have you seen my car keys?

  • Have you seen my phone?

  • I ask one of those two questions almost every morning.

  • The third really common question that I hear in the morning,

  • because Jen asks me this question a lot,

  • is the question are you running late?

  • Sometimes in the morning I get up

  • and I have a shower and I have breakfast

  • and I'm trying to find my keys or find my phone

  • and time is ticking.

  • That means that I'm starting to become late for work.

  • When I'm in that mood, when I'm moving fast

  • and looking for stuff to try and get out the door

  • sometimes Jen will say, "Hey, are you running late?"

  • Basically what she's saying is

  • are you starting to become late for work?

  • Have you spent too much time getting ready to go

  • and are you now going to be late for work?

  • So another question you will hear quite often

  • in the home would be the question are you running late.

  • There's another question that Jen usually asks me

  • before I leave the house, and it's the question

  • when do you think you'll be home,

  • or what time do you think you'll be home?

  • My work day ends at around 4:00, 4:30,

  • but it's not always over at the same time every day.

  • Sometimes I have errands to run after work as well.

  • So Jen sometimes is curious about when I'll be getting home.

  • So she'll ask one of two questions.

  • What time do you think you'll be home?

  • Or when do you think you'll be home?

  • The fifth most common question I hear every day

  • is a question that I hear at work.

  • And I hear this question when I walk in the door,

  • and I hear it multiple times.

  • And it's the question how's it going?

  • It usually starts with the word hey.

  • We like to say, "Hey, how's it going?"

  • And I know there are a lot of videos

  • that English teachers have made saying

  • that you should use other phrases when greeting people,

  • that hey, how's it going is really common

  • and you should have some variety when you say hi.

  • But the reality is, this is the phrase

  • that English speakers that I know use all the time.

  • When I walk in the door at work, when I see my boss,

  • he says, "Hey, how's it going?"

  • And I say, "Pretty good, how are you?"

  • When I see someone at work, when I see a colleague,

  • I say, "Hey, how's it going?"

  • And they usually respond by saying, "Oh, pretty good.

  • How are you?"

  • So even though it's a super common phrase

  • and maybe you would like some variety

  • in your English speaking, it's still very, very common

  • for English speakers to say hey, how's it going?

  • The sixth super common question that I hear at work

  • is the question can you give me a hand with something?

  • At my job, sometimes it takes more than one person

  • to do certain parts of the job.

  • And sometimes people need help.

  • In English, when you give someone a hand,

  • when you give someone a hand with something,

  • it means you're helping them.

  • So if someone says can you give me a hand

  • with something later today?

  • It means they need some help.

  • You can also use this question

  • if you want to be really nice.

  • If you see someone doing something

  • and you think they need help, you can say,

  • can I give you a hand with that?

  • Or can I give you a hand?

  • So the sixth most common question that I hear at work

  • is can you give me a hand with something.

  • The seventh most common question that I hear,

  • and this is another question that I hear often at work

  • is the question do you have a minute.

  • When someone says to you do you have a minute?

  • It usually means that they want to talk to you.

  • Sometimes it means that they need help with something

  • but usually it means they want to talk to you.

  • If my boss walks up to me and says,

  • "Hey, Bob do you have a minute?"

  • It means he wants to talk to me about something.

  • If I see a student who has late work

  • and hasn't handed it in, I might say to them,

  • "Hey, do you have a minute?"

  • It means that I want to talk to them.

  • So the seventh most common question that you'll hear

  • is do you have a minute?

  • The eighth most common question is another question

  • that I hear a lot at work.

  • And I usually hear it at lunchtime

  • or I ask this question at lunchtime.

  • And it's the question, how's your day going?

  • Or how's your day going so far?

  • This is just a really polite way to begin conversation

  • with colleagues at lunch.

  • I work with really awesome, nice people.

  • So we really enjoy talking about each other's day

  • as we eat lunch together.

  • So the eighth most common question that I hear

  • in my day as an English speaker, how's your day going?

  • Or how's your day going so far?

  • How's your day going so far?

  • I hope pretty good.

  • The ninth most common question that I either hear or ask

  • is the question how was your day?

  • This is a question that I ask at home.

  • This is a question that I ask Jen almost every day.

  • And Jen asks me the same question.

  • When I get home from work, as soon as I see Jen,

  • I usually say, "Hey, how's it going?

  • How was your day?"

  • So I greet her with how's it going, again.

  • And I say, how was your day?

  • And Jen will explain a little bit about how her day went.

  • And then she'll say to me, "How was your day?"

  • And I will tell her a little bit

  • about what happened at school and what happened at work.

  • So the ninth most common question that I hear

  • and that I ask and that happens almost every day in my life,

  • and I think it's a really important one,

  • is the question how was your day?

  • So I said I was going to help you learn

  • 10 common English questions that I hear or use every day,

  • but it's actually going to be 11.

  • There's going to be a bonus question.

  • The two last questions are the two questions

  • I hear at the end of the day.

  • The first question is, what time are you going to bed?

  • Jen and I usually go to bed somewhere between 10 and 11,

  • but it's not the same time every night.

  • So sometimes when I'm done watching TV

  • or done reading a book or we're done

  • playing a game or something,

  • I'll say to Jen, "What time are you going to bed?"

  • And Jen sometimes asks me that question as well.

  • Sometimes I'm playing a game on my computer at 10 o'clock

  • and she'll say, "Hey, Bob, what time are you going to bed?"

  • And then the other question is the last question

  • that Jen usually asks me.

  • And it's the question did you set the alarm?

  • So at the end of the day

  • it's important to set your alarm clock.

  • Sometimes I forget to do that.

  • So it's really nice to have Jen there

  • to ask me that question.

  • Hey Bob, did you set the alarm?

  • Well, hey, thank you so much for watching

  • this English lesson about common English questions

  • that English speakers either hear or use

  • as they go through their day.

  • I hope you enjoyed this lesson.

  • If you did, please consider clicking that subscribe button

  • if you're not already a subscriber,

  • and giving me a thumbs up is just a good idea

  • if this lesson helped you learn a little bit more English.

  • And of course, if you have the time,

  • why don't you stick around and watch another English lesson?

  • (upbeat music)

Hi, Bob the Canadian here.

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Common English Questions We Use Every Day!

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    羅仁咨 posted on 2022/05/04
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