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  • Hey, everyone, I'm Carl Azuz; happy to see you this Tuesday.

  • We're starting today's show in Europe.

  • For the first time in 20 years, a French president has won re-election.

  • That president is Emmanuel Macron.

  • On Sunday, he faced off against the same candidate, Marine Le Pen, who'd run against him in the 2017 election.

  • President Macron's victory wasn't by as many votes this time as it was five years ago.

  • On Sunday, Le Pen won 41.5 percent of the votethat's the most ever for a candidate from France's National Rally Party.

  • But President Macron from the onwards Republic Party won 58.5 percent of the vote.

  • In his victory speech, he promised he'd be a president for each and every one of the French.

  • But after the election, he and Le Pen still disagreed on whether Macron could smooth out political divisions in France.

  • The President said he must; Le Pen said he wouldn't.

  • Those divisions were clear among the protesters who opposed President Macron on the left side of your screen and the supporters who celebrated his victory on the right.

  • Many voters didn't turn out for either candidate.

  • The French government says the abstention rate, the percentage of people who didn't vote at all, was 28%⏤that's its highest level in more than 50 years.

  • And regardless of the election's outcome, the challenges facing France remain high.

  • The country has seen several political storms since the 2017 election.

  • And amid rising energy prices that only got worse after Russia invaded Ukraine, France's newly re-elected leader has a lot to deal with in the months ahead.

  • President Macron says he'll address all of France's current problems, and that his second term will not be a continuation of his first.

  • One thing that could affect his governing ability are France's upcoming parliamentary elections.

  • Those are happening in June, and Le Pen says her party is in an excellent position to make gains in them.

  • Young, bold, ambitious.

  • [French] We are at the dawn of an extraordinary renaissance.

  • When Emmanuel Macron became the president of France in 2017, he promised a fresh direction for the country: pro-business and staunchly pro-European.

  • Within months, he was mired in challenges that would dog his presidency.

  • The first was one of his own making.

  • Sparked by attacks on diesel that particularly affected poorer rural drivers, tens of thousands of French protesters took to the streets.

  • [French] French people don't have the means to buy an electric vehicle, and if you want it, it's the straw that broke the camel's back.

  • The yellow vest movement became one of the most significant French protests in decades.

  • Although Macron eventually rode back on the diesel tax.

  • [French] I will not give anything to those who want destruction and disorder because the Republic is both public order and the free expression of opinions.

  • As protests faded, the unexpected struck: COVID-19.

  • "We're at war," declared Macron, shutting down France in one of the strictest lockdowns in Europe.

  • So, [the] first wave, people were really angry 'cause of neglect, and the need for full lockdown, and the number of fatal cases.

  • Despite a slow rollout for European vaccines, Macron doubled down on vaccinations to get France out of lockdowns, mandating health passes to push people to get jabbed.

  • Protests from a vocal minority erupted in response, even as demand for vaccines skyrocketed almost overnight.

  • But it's been internationally where Macron has had some of his most important moments, all marked by his distinctive style.

  • He speaks his mind, he speaks loud, but you cannot use the same old diplomatic words, and he's done it quite often.

  • It's blunt, it's disruptive.

  • But then people listen.

  • 10-second trivia: Which of these Greek scientists would have had the earliest laboratory?

  • Pythagoras, Archimedes, Plato, or Aristotle.

  • Pythagoras was born the longest time ago in 570 BC and might have had the first laboratory ever recorded.

  • Up next: A new way to conduct medical research using virtual reality technology.

  • That in itself is a new concept.

  • The practice of research and laboratories directly interacting with whatever matter you're studying goes back millennia.

  • But with new tools come new ideas.

  • And a company named "Nanome", which is featured in our next report, isn't the only one that offers VR software for scientific research.

  • There are some potential drawbacks to this.

  • For one thing, virtual reality has long been criticized for causing motion sickness in some users.

  • Some of the technology is still experimental; it's not as refined as tried-and-true traditional research.

  • It's not known yet if the insight it offers is worth the investmentyou've got to buy the headsets, the computers, the software.

  • And Nanome itself might not be as user-friendly in some ways as its competitors.

  • But it is one way in which scientists and medical companies can get an immersive view of the molecules they're studying.

  • Oh, okay, well, let's give me some hair.

  • This might look like a game, but I'm exploring a virtual reality platform that helps scientists design real medicines by putting them inside the molecules they study.

  • I mean, this is crazy; I'm, like, in the molecule looking up at it.

  • Joining me is Steve Mccloskey, the 30-year-old, co-founded, San Diego-based startup Nanome in 2016 to develop the technology.

  • But you started off as an academic nano engineer, so, what inspired you to get into the technology space and actually create this platform?

  • Yeah, I've always been into gaming, grew up [a] big gamer.

  • I remember how different it was to go into VR and be in the environment compared to just playing a 2D game.

  • When I was going through nanoengineering, I was, like, "Why don't we have a better immersive graphics way to do this?"

  • Turns out, a lot of scientists were asking the same.

  • Something else in the park.

  • Since the platform launched in 2018, hundreds of organizations have adopted Nanome's VR tools for their research.

  • Mccloskey says at a cost of $5,000 plus per year...

  • Being able to go into VR, you actually immediately gain new insights, so this could send you on a completely new path of molecular development that would've otherwise never been discovered.

  • That's exactly what's needed to fight one growing health crisis: antibiotic resistance.

  • It's what happens when bacteria adapt and no longer respond to today's antibiotics, making common infections difficult to treat, and even fatal.

  • LifeArc, a medical research charity based in the UK, is using Nanome's VR to search for molecules that can fight some of these bugs.

  • These bacteria are inherently difficult to develop new drugs for because they've got very high natural defenses.

  • Tackling the problem in three dimensions helps speed up discovery, LifeArc says, but there are still financial hurdles to overcome.

  • The commercial returns for new antibiotics are really poor.

  • That's because, compared to other medications, antibiotics are cheap to buy but expensive to develop.

  • What kind of time savings does Nanome allow for, and how does that then translate to cost savings?

  • Getting a drug to market six months quicker might be worth tens or even hundreds of millions of dollars of value because you're able to start selling it earlier.

  • This is gonna be patient lives that you're saving, improvements in their lives.

  • Even with a quicker path to discovery, only around 1 in 10 new antibiotics make it past clinical trial, and no antibiotic designed with Nanome's platform is at that stage yet.

  • But Mccloskey says the VR gives more scientists a chance to beat the odds.

  • There's actually a free version.

  • We try to make it as accessible as possible, really democratizing access to scientific tools like this and trying to see a billion scientists in the world.

  • Teachers, parents, homeschoolers, instructors, if you want to know what's in each day's show,

  • if you want a direct link to where you can submit your artwork for our new show open,

  • if you want your inbox to be just a little more awesome,

  • please sign up for our free daily newsletter at cnn10.com, scroll down to where it says "sign up for daily emails".

  • Well, here's a world record attempt you don't hear about every day.

  • This is Whitby Abbey in the United Kingdom; its ruins date back as early as the 600s.

  • But more recently, in 1890, the author Bram Stoker visited the site and he wrote it into his famous novel "Dracula".

  • That book came out 125 years ago, so, to commemorate that, there's gonna be live music, food and drinks, and free entry to people styled like Dracula.

  • The goal? To break the record for the most people dressed as vampires in one placethat record is 1,039, but who's "counting"?

  • I was just gonna end the show there, but then I thought, "I could 'vamp' a bit."

  • This could be an interesting "caper" to tell the "tooths"; some people are really "stoked" about it; they're certainly gonna "bat" an eye.

  • And, so, I decided to "sink my teeth" into a few more puns because I thought of them in the "neck" of time.

  • I'm "Count del Azuz"; we are gonna shout-out Seaford High School today.

  • It is in Seaford, Delaware.

  • Thank you for your request at youtube.com/cnn10.

Hey, everyone, I'm Carl Azuz; happy to see you this Tuesday.

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Virtual Reality Inside A Molecule | April 26, 2022

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    林宜悉 posted on 2022/05/02
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