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  • The world's largest coral reef is in danger.

  • Now, a UN assessment begins.

  • Hello, I'm Rob and this is News Review

  • from BBC Learning English,

  • and to talk about this story with me is Roy. Hello Roy.

  • Hello Rob and hello everybody.

  • If you would like to test yourself on the vocabulary around this story,

  • all you need to do is head to our website

  • bbclearningenglish.com to take a quiz.

  • But now, let's hear more about this story from this BBC News report:

  • So, this story is about the Great Barrier Reef,

  • which is the world's largest barrier reef

  • and is located in Australia.

  • Some scientists say that it is under threat

  • from the effects of climate change.

  • A UN delegation is going to assess the barrier reef's health.

  • It wants to assess whether its World Heritage status

  • should be changed to 'in danger'.

  • And we've got three words and expressions

  • from the news headlines about this story.

  • What are they please?

  • We have 'in danger', 'weighs' and 'dire'.

  • That's 'in danger', 'weighs' and 'dire'.

  • OK. Well, let's pick the first word

  • from your first headline. What is it please?

  • OK. So, the first headline is from RTE and it reads:

  • That's 'in danger' — at risk.

  • Yeah, OK. So, this is two words.

  • First word: 'in' — I-N.

  • Second word: 'danger' — D-A-N-G-E-R.

  • And it basically means the possibility of harm to someone or something,

  • or even death.

  • And I noticed that we add the preposition 'in',

  • not 'at' or 'on danger'.

  • Yeah, we commonly use it with 'in danger',

  • to say that something is at risk or under threat.

  • And we said 'in danger' not 'endangered'.

  • There's a difference there, isn't there?

  • Yes, there is. So, 'in danger': I-N, D-A-N-G-E-R — the two words

  • basically means you're at risk of harm or death potentially.

  • You're in a dangerous situation.

  • So, for example, maybe it's late at night

  • and I'm worried, I'm a little bit scared,

  • so I call my... my wife to come and pick me up from the area

  • because I feel that I am 'in danger'.

  • In other words, I am at risk of harm.

  • 'Endangered', which is E-N-D-A-N-G-E-R-E-D:

  • we usually use it to talk about an animal or a plant

  • that is at risk of going extinctexisting no more.

  • So, there are many 'endangered' species in the world.

  • OK. I've got it. 'Endangered' is about extinction

  • wildlife becoming extinct.

  • 'In danger' is about a risk to your...your safety, I guess.

  • Absolutely.

  • And, I mean, danger is a serious thing: being 'in danger' is very serious.

  • Do we always use this expression in a, kind of, serious context?

  • Well, we can also use it informally to also mean 'at risk'.

  • So, for example, if you're a football fan

  • and you're watching your football team; they're not playing very well.

  • You could say the team is 'in danger' of losing the match.

  • So, 'at risk' there.

  • OK. Well, we're 'in danger' of running out of time

  • so let's get on with a summary:

  • We've talked about the Great Barrier Reef on News Review before.

  • It's always been 'in danger'.

  • How can we watch this video again please, Roy?

  • All you need to do is click the link in the description below.

  • Just down there below. Fantastic.

  • OK. Let's have a look at your next news headline please.

  • OK. So, our next headline comes from Channel NewsAsia and it reads:

  • So, that's 'weighs' — carefully considers facts

  • in order to make a decision.

  • OK. So, 'weighs' is spelt W-E-I-G-H-S and it is a verb.

  • And it basically means to consider something

  • or think about something very deeply and carefully.

  • And I'm familiar with this word 'weighs' and the word 'weight'.

  • It's to do with measuring the heaviness of something.

  • So, you put things on a scale, maybe,

  • or some scales and you measure how heavy something is.

  • That's 'weighing', isn't it?

  • Yeah and it's sort-of connected. OK.

  • So, for example, when you're talking about the physical 'weight', as you say,

  • you're putting an object onto some scales or a machine to 'weigh'...

  • to measure how heavy something is.

  • We commonly talk about things like kilos, kilograms, grams,

  • stonesin British English we talk about stones and pounds

  • some people use those measurements to talk about the physical heaviness.

  • Now, 'weigh' in the... or 'weighs' in the headline

  • is actually talking about taking all of the information and the facts

  • and considering what they meanconsidering what that information means.

  • It's 'weigh' the... 'weigh up' the information.

  • And notice there I said 'weigh up'.

  • We commonly use a phrasal verb — 'weigh something up'

  • or 'weigh up something'.

  • So, to give you an example of that, recently we talked about your phone.

  • You have a... you had a very...

  • a terrible phone. It was broken.

  • I think you said one of the buttons, the... the letters didn't work.

  • And I kept telling you to buy a new phone and in the end I said:

  • 'Look, just think about all the positives and the negatives.

  • Weigh up the pros and the cons.'

  • Yeah. And that's what I did.

  • I 'weighed up' all my options and chose a brand-new, shiny phone.

  • Thank you for that, Roy.

  • You're welcome.

  • And also, when I go into the cake shop, because I love cakes,

  • I like to 'weigh up' my options there.

  • I look at all those delicious pastries, which one to choose.

  • I often choose the one that is going to make me put on more 'weight'.

  • That's the noun: 'weight'. More heavy.

  • Yes, W-E-I-G-H-T — 'weight', the noun.

  • Indeed. Thank you. Let's have a summary:

  • So, we've been talking about the word 'weight'

  • and we did a programme about the expression 'punch above your weight'.

  • The programme is called The English We Speak.

  • And how can we watch it again, Roy?

  • All you need to do is click the link in the description below.

  • OK. Let's have a look at your next headline please.

  • OK. So, our next headline comes from the Climate Council website

  • and it reads:

  • That's 'dire' — extremely serious.

  • Yes. So, this word is 'dire' and it is spelt D-I-R-E.

  • And it basically is an adjective

  • and it's used to describe something that is very bad or very serious.

  • So, we use the word 'dire' to talk about bad situations.

  • Yes. So, we commonly use it to talk about situations or conditions.

  • So, for example, if somebody is living in a house with no heating,

  • no water, no electricity,

  • we could say that they are living in 'dire' conditions

  • very serious or bad conditions.

  • Another way that we use the word 'dire' though,

  • and it's slightly different, is in front of the word 'need'...

  • 'In dire need' — 'in dire need of' something.

  • And it means when we are desperate or really, really need something.

  • So, for example, in the morning, I maybe wake up,

  • I'm really tired and I'm very dramatic.

  • I say: 'Ugh. I'm in dire need of a coffee.'

  • You are desperate for coffee. I know that feeling.

  • And what about the expression 'in dire straits'.

  • I've heard about that as well.

  • OK. So, yeah, 'in dire straits' —

  • we sometimes use this and it talks about very serious or...

  • or a terrible situation. So...

  • and we commonly use this to talk about money — a lack of money.

  • So, for example, at the end of the month,

  • just before you get paid again, maybe you've spent all of your money

  • and you have no money to do anything or to buy food.

  • You could say that you are in 'dire straits'.

  • It's talking about a very serious situation

  • with a lack of money in that case.

  • Yeah, an extreme situation: 'dire straits'.

  • OK. Let's have a summary:

  • OK. Roy, it's time now for you to recap the words and expressions

  • that we've talked about today please.

  • OK. So, we had 'in danger' — at risk.

  • 'Weighs' — carefully considers facts in order to make a decision.

  • And we had 'dire' — extremely serious.

  • Now, if you want to test your understanding

  • of today's words and expressions,

  • we have a quiz on our website

  • at bbclearningenglish.com

  • and that's the place to go to for lots of other

  • Learning English resources, so check it out.

  • Oh, and don't forgetwe're all over social media as well.

  • OK. Well, that's all for today's News Review.

  • Thank you so much for watching and we'll see you next time.

  • Bye for now. Bye bye.

  • Bye!

The world's largest coral reef is in danger.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

A1 dire danger weigh weighs reef headline

BBC News Review: Great Barrier Reef in Danger

  • 31 5
    林宜悉 posted on 2022/03/11
Video vocabulary