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  • Tennis star Novak Djokovic has won his appeal to stay in Australia

  • so he can defend his Australian Open title.

  • Hello, I'm Rob and welcome to News Review from BBC Learning English.

  • Joining me today is Roy. Hello Roy.

  • Hello Rob and hello everybody.

  • If you would like to test yourself on the vocabulary around this story,

  • all you need to do is head to our website

  • bbclearningenglish.com to take a quiz.

  • But now, let's hear more about this story from this BBC News report:

  • So, Novak Djokovic has won an appeal against the cancellation of his visa

  • and can now stay in Australia and compete in the Australian Open.

  • Djokovic, who arrived in Australia recently,

  • believed that he was permitted to enter the country

  • after recently recovering from the Covid virus

  • and as a result was exempt from the Covid virus rules.

  • The Australian government has said it could still cancel the visa.

  • And we've got three words and expressions we can learn about

  • to help us talk about this story, haven't we? What are they, Roy?

  • Yeah. Yes, we have. We have: 'quashes',

  • 'handed reprieve' and 'clearing path'.

  • That's 'quashes', 'handed reprieve' and 'clearing path'.

  • OK. Let's take that first word, which appears in which headline please?

  • Well, the first headline is from the Guardian and it reads:

  • So, that's 'quashes' – rejects something officially.

  • Yes, so 'quashes' is a verb

  • and it's spelt Q-U-A-S-H-E-S

  • and it means to reject something officially.

  • It's often used in a court of law and we can't...

  • we quite commonly hear it when it says that a...

  • when a decision that was previously made

  • somebody has said that that decision is no longer accepted,

  • so they 'quash' a previous decision.

  • OK. So, it's no longer accepted. So, this is interesting:

  • in the case of this headline, we're saying that the judge says that

  • the decision to cancel his visa was no longer accepted, yeah?

  • That's right, yeah. So... and we have other... other things.

  • For example, if a person receives a conviction or they go to prison,

  • and then later on somebody decides that — a judge decides that that's...

  • that punishment, that conviction, is no longer valid, it's not accepted,

  • they would 'quash' that person's sentence.

  • OK. And it's a strange word — 'quashes'.

  • I mean, it reminds me of the word 'squashes':

  • when you squeeze something, you suppress something,

  • when you 'squash' something. Is there any kind of connection here?

  • Well, it's interesting that you say that

  • because 'quash' has a secondary meaning

  • and the secondary meaning of 'quash' is basically to suppress something

  • or stop something from happening.

  • So, for example, if there's a rumour that you think is incorrect,

  • you could 'quash' that rumour.

  • It means to suppress or prevent it from... from happening.

  • And another example, I guess, where there are protests in some countries,

  • the authorities want to 'quash' the protests, don't they?

  • They want to suppress or stop that protest.

  • Correct. Yeah.

  • OK. OK. Let's have a summary of that word please:

  • We've talked about Novak Djokovic before here on News Review,

  • when he hit a ball at someone, didn't he, Roy?

  • Yes, and all you need to do to learn more about that story

  • is click the link in the description below.

  • Yeah, just down below there. Thanks Roy.

  • OK. Let's look at your next news headline please.

  • So, our next news headline comes from the website Tennis365 and it reads:

  • So, that's 'handed reprieve' — given cancellation of a punishment.

  • Right. So, this is a two-word expression.

  • First word: 'handed' — H-A-N-D-E-D.

  • Second word: 'reprieve' — R-E-P-R-I-E-V-E.

  • Now, 'handed' means to be given something,

  • so it's quite often used officially: you're 'handed' something.

  • And 'reprieve' is the cancellation or the postponement of a punishment.

  • Now, this headline relates to the fact that during the hearing

  • Novak Djokovic was allowed to leave the hotel where he was staying.

  • OK. You've used the word 'handed' there.

  • I mean, I know what a 'hand' is. Look: there's a 'hand'.

  • Very usefulThey come in 'handy'.

  • What's that got to do with this headline?

  • Well, quite literally, 'handed' means to pass something

  • from one 'hand' to another.

  • It's a verb. So, for example,

  • if we're in the office together and I say:

  • 'Oh, I need a pen. Oh, Rob, could you hand me that pen please?'

  • I mean can you 'give' me that pen.

  • Sometimes it's used more figuratively,

  • for example, in a court of law where they are 'given' something.

  • So, you could be, for example, 'handed a reprieve' in this sense:

  • 'given a reprieve'.

  • Yeah. So, he was given a 'reprieve'. So, that means to end...

  • end his punishment, yeah? Is that right?

  • That's absolutely right. That's what 'reprieve' means:

  • to cancel or postpone some kind of punishment.

  • So, in this case he was staying in a detention centre and he received a...

  • he was given a 'reprieve'.

  • OK. And there's a, kind of, another meaning really

  • to this expression as well, isn't there?

  • There is. It can mean, sort of, a welcome

  • or a good, kind of, delay to something — a 'reprieve'.

  • So, for example, maybe a company is having financial problems

  • and they risk going... going bustgoing bankrupt.

  • But at the last minute, they are given an emergency loan.

  • We could say maybe: 'They are given a reprieve.'

  • A 'reprieve' from going bust.

  • Great. Interesting stuff. Let's have a summary of that expression:

  • Well, we were just talking about hands and how important they are

  • when you 'hand' something to someone.

  • So, it's important, therefore, to wash your hands

  • and we made a programme all about

  • the importance of hand washing, didn't we, Roy?

  • Yes, we did and all you need to do to watch that programme

  • is click the link in the description below.

  • Yeah, down below. Great.

  • OK. Let's have a look at our next headline please.

  • OK. So, our next headline comes from the Washington Post and it reads:

  • So, that's 'clearing path' — allowing something to happen or proceed.

  • Yes. So, another two-word expression.

  • The first word is 'clearing' — C-L-E-A-R-I-N-G.

  • Second word: 'path' — P-A-T-H.

  • Now, 'clearing' here is being used as a verb

  • and it means to remove things or obstacles.

  • And 'path' is talking about the way forward.

  • So, what it's actually saying is you are removing obstacles from the way ahead.

  • OK. I know all about clearing paths:

  • where I live, I have a path in my front garden

  • that leads from the road to the house

  • and I have to clear that sometimes because... particularly, like,

  • for example, when it snows, I clear the path from all the snow,

  • so that I have a clear passageway into my house, yeah?

  • Yes, and that's a very literal usage of the word 'path'.

  • It is something that we walk on,

  • but we also use it more figuratively

  • to mean the way forwardthe way ahead, you know.

  • But, for example, in the headline when we're talking about 'clearing the path',

  • you're talking about opening up the opportunity: opening an opportunity.

  • And 'clear' can mean obvious

  • and it's easy to see. Is that right?

  • Yeah. So, as I said, 'clear' in the headline is a verb,

  • but we can also use it as an adjective.

  • So, you can say something is obvious.

  • So, if we talk about a 'clear path' using that word 'path' again

  • maybe you have a 'clear career path': you have an obvious career path,

  • so you know exactly what you want to do in life

  • and where you want to go throughout your career.

  • A 'clear career path' means obvious.

  • Well, thank you, Roy. You made that very clear.

  • So, let's have a summary of that expression:

  • Well, now it's time to recap the vocabulary

  • that we've been talking about today.

  • Yes, we had: 'quashes' — rejects something officially.

  • We had: 'handed reprieve' — given cancellation of a punishment.

  • And we had: 'clearing path' — allowing something to happen or proceed.

  • Thank you, Roy. Now, if you want to test your understanding

  • of these words and expressions, we have a quiz on our website

  • at bbclearningenglish.com.

  • That's the place to go for all our Learning English resources

  • and don't forgetwe're all over social media as well.

  • That's all for today's News Review.

  • Thank you for watching and see you next time. Bye bye!

  • Bye.

Tennis star Novak Djokovic has won his appeal to stay in Australia

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Djokovic vs Australia: Novak to stay - BBC News Review

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/11/15
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