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  • Concentration.

  • It is necessary to be really good at what you're doing.

  • I wonder if we can play a game today.

  • Hi. James from engVid.

  • I was reading a book on concentration, and it dawned on me...

  • And "to dawn on you" means I understood something that a lot of times when we play games, we

  • concentrate, we really concentrate, we enjoy it and we learn a lot.

  • And what I'm thinking today is that I would like to teach you a game that could help you

  • concentrate and learn grammar easily and make it fun.

  • I know that sounds like that doesn't make sense, it's like opposites, but bear with me.

  • Stay with me and let's see where we go.

  • Okay?

  • So, Mr. E's playing a game.

  • Some of you know this as tic-tac-toe, some of you know it as Xs and Os, and I'm going

  • to use this game here to help you learn phrasal verbs.

  • Very difficult subject for a lot of people, and today I hope to make it easy and fun.

  • You will be able to do this by yourself and do it with a friend or family, or other students.

  • You ready?

  • Let's go to the board.

  • Because as E says, he wins and you can, too.

  • So, first I'm going to look at is preposition, and I'm going to pick one.

  • Because when we play this game of Xs and Os, you can see the board is here, we're going

  • to play and I'm going to teach you how to use this preposition with these verbs to create

  • phrasal verbs.

  • Now, one of the things we want to do is figure out what "up" means.

  • You don't have to do this.

  • You can just go in...

  • You're on the internet, and you could look up these verbs, and see, you know, the phrasal

  • verb "pull up", what does it mean?

  • "Pick up", "close up", but today I'm going to help you with "up".

  • We actually have a video with phrasal verbs on it, or many videos, where you can go and

  • research and find out what these ones mean and other ones.

  • And I believe I did one that gives you a method for "up", "down", and other phrasal verbs.

  • Go check it out.

  • www.engvid.com.

  • Right?

  • So: "up".

  • "Up" can mean more.

  • Okay?

  • "Increase", "closer", "improve", "finish", or "end".

  • So, when you know that "up" can mean these things, it means when we use these words here,

  • we add "up", it will change the meaning of each word and give it a new meaning with the

  • two words combined.

  • For instance: "pull up".

  • When we pull up it means to get closer, so when an English-speaking person says to you:

  • "Please pull up a chair", it means get a chair and sit close with us.

  • "Pull up" means closer, move closer.

  • "Pick up".

  • "Pick up" has several meanings but I'm not going to go into all of them.

  • I'm going to give you one that you can use now.

  • If you say: "I will pick you up at 4 o'clock or 5", it means I will come to a place you

  • are at, meet you, and we will go together.

  • A lot of times when someone says "pick you up" it means they will either have a taxi

  • or a car, and they will take you, transport you with them.

  • That's why they're picking you up, or they would say: "I would come to your house".

  • "Close up", when you close up a store it means to shut, finish, and you end the work, so

  • you close the door and go home.

  • "We going to close up at about 6 o'clock."

  • We will finish working about 6 o'clock.

  • "Lift up", well, this pen, lift it up.

  • We could say it more, and I should have added "move", right?

  • Because when you lift something up, you take it from a lower position, you put it to a

  • higher position.

  • "Brighten up".

  • "Brighten up" means to go bright, so we go from...

  • Well, let's look here: Purple, this is brightened up.

  • It's not clean, it's not perfect, but it's brighter.

  • Right?

  • So "brighten up" means to give more light.

  • Or it could mean make happier.

  • "He brightened up at the prospect of going out."

  • He got happier.

  • "Hold up" means to make wait.

  • If you're saying: "What's holding up the train?"

  • It means: "Why is the train staying here?

  • Why is it waiting?"

  • "Shot up", it means to go straight up.

  • "The rock got shot up into the sky".

  • "Clean up" means to clean.

  • "Let's clean up the room."

  • Let's clean it up, make it better.

  • In this case, improve the condition of the room.

  • "Take up" means review.

  • So, when you take something up it means to review or discuss.

  • So: "We're going to take up the homework once we've finished the class."

  • Cool?

  • Or: "We'll take up this conversation at a later time."

  • We will continue it and come back to it later.

  • So now I've given you a quick overview of these nine phrasal verbs, let's play a game,

  • shall we?

  • I will be blue and you will be red.

  • So, an example of this is when you call out the phrasal verb, let's just say: "Okay, I

  • want to go to this square", then you'd have to call it out and say: "Okay, the phrasal

  • verb is 'pull up'", and then in order to get my mark, because I'm going to be blue, I would

  • have to say what "pull up" means.

  • My friend was having dinner out with some other co-workers, and they asked me to pull

  • up a chair.

  • Correct.

  • Woo.

  • I get this square.

  • Now it's your turn.

  • You might want to say: "Hmm, I bought some flower..."

  • So: "brighten up".

  • "Brighten up", okay, good.

  • What's the sentence?

  • I bought some...

  • Oh, you know what?

  • Let's have E play for you because he's here.

  • E could say: "I bought some flowers to brighten up the room."

  • Good for you, E, you get a square.

  • I think you could see how the game would go.

  • Now I could go here, but maybe "shot up" is too difficult.

  • Yeah?

  • And I might go: "Oh, I can't do that one, so I will go here: 'take up'".

  • Okay, past tense.

  • Past tense.

  • We took up the homework in the morning, we took it up.

  • Take up, remember?

  • So, "take up" is the present tense, but because I had to use the past tense, I had to change

  • it a bit.

  • So remember when I said you have to say it?

  • You have to use the sentence correctly.

  • We have to use the right term, right?

  • So it would be past tense: We took up the homework in the morning.

  • I would get my circle.

  • You guys want to try one with E?

  • So what's E saying, he says: "Pick".

  • Want to try "pick"?

  • Okay.

  • "Pick up".

  • I'll pick you up at 8 tonight...

  • At your house.

  • Good, thanks, because that gives more explanation is just words, but: "I will pick you up at

  • your house", I will meet you.

  • You're good at this.

  • It's my turn.

  • Let's try "clean up" to do, you know, I reviewed "clean up", "clean up".

  • There was a cleanup yesterday.

  • What?

  • What do you mean that's not a phrasal verb?

  • What do you mean "a" is an article?

  • Oh, you're right, I clean up, oh, that's not a phrasal verb because it's got to be a verb

  • plus a preposition, and I used a phrase.

  • Damn it.

  • Your turn.

  • "Let's clean up his mess because he doesn't know English."

  • That was mean, but you know what?

  • You're correct.

  • So you would win the game.

  • And in this we have talked about the prepositions, we've used them in sentences, got a deeper

  • understanding, and then a little competition.

  • Cool, huh?

  • Well, I have another way to make it...

  • Because I mean right now this is kind of easy and that's one.

  • So, how about we learn how to do a few of them.

  • You ready?

  • [Snaps].

  • Okay, so the first time we did this I made it easy.

  • I gave you...

  • Well, what did we do?

  • We had many words and we used one preposition: "up", and we went through nine examples.

  • Right?

  • That was easy.

  • That was fun.

  • This is a harder version.

  • You'll notice here that I'm using nine different prepositions, and you're probably going to

  • say: "What are these numbers beside?"

  • Well, once you've learned to master the preposition "up" and its meanings, you can go on: "to",

  • and "on", and so on.

  • It sounds like it's a lot, but trust me, when you look at the preposition...

  • Sorry, the phrasal book, phrasal verb preposition book, it's about that thick.

  • Here you're going to learn maybe 30, 40, or 50, and you'll become a master of them by

  • playing a simple game, especially when you play with your friends, you'll learn even faster.

  • So how do you play this game and what makes it different?

  • Well, this time when you play with your friend, you won't be able to just say: "Okay, 'pull

  • up', make a sentence."

  • If the number says 4 and it says "up", you're going to have to come up with four phrasal

  • verbs, so in this case what we're doing is we're just giving the preposition and you

  • actually have to remember: What are the verbs that go with this?

  • Sometimes the same verb can go, like: "shut", "down", and "shut up" can go together, right?

  • Which is great.

  • Sometimes you cannot put them together.

  • You just can't do that.

  • So, you're going to learn which ones go from the meanings we talked about earlier when

  • we did "up", and I did tell you to go check the website for the other ones where I know

  • I've done phrasal verb videos on "down", "up", "in", and "out", check them out.

  • Anyway.

  • So in this case when you play the game, if you want to get an X here, you would have

  • to say: "Okay, first off, 'up'.

  • There's 'pull up', 'close up', 'shut up', and 'take up'." Okay?

  • And when you're looking at that, you'd say that, but you'd still have to say four sentences.

  • Whoa.

  • Look, I am making this a bit challenging, but I know you can do it.

  • The first game will get you practice for each individual one and you'll get very good at

  • it.

  • And then in order to speak English like a fluent speaker, you're going to have to master

  • the other ones.

  • And if you follow this method, you'll be able to do it.

  • I promise.

  • Okay?

  • So we've come up with four phrasal verbs, we go: "Okay, I know four.

  • We'll go to the ones we learned earlier, so 'pull up'."

  • The car pulled up to the house at night.

  • The car pulls up close to...

  • Pulled up on my driver, closer to.

  • Right?

  • "Close up": We like to close up early on Saturdays because we like to go to the beach and finish work.

  • "Shut up", okay, I didn't do that one but I think it's universal, it means close your

  • mouth, stop speaking, shut up, but it means shut up now or stop speaking now.

  • And "take up": We're going to take up the homework after we have lunch.

  • Now that I've used all four of these, they are correct, first of all.

  • Then I use them in sentences, now I can leave my mark.

  • A lot harder work, but well deserved.

  • Because when you win a game from doing this, you'll go: "Whoa, I really know."

  • Well, look anywhere from 10 phrasal verbs, 20 phrasal verbs, not bad.

  • Huh?

  • All from playing Xs and Os or tic-tac-toe.

  • Now, before I wrap up this particular video, I would like to give you some homework.

  • "Oh. What?" Yeah.

  • Now, where are you going to take up this homework?

  • Saying we did this, or it means review.

  • On the website.

  • We've got a thriving community, a lot of people come down after they do the quiz, they talk

  • to each other. I'm inviting you to join them. Okay?

  • Share your knowledge, share your wisdom.

  • Help other people.

  • Maybe play the game with them online, too, yeah?

  • See how it goes.

  • Anyway, your homework for this particular video is, number one: Remember what we did

  • before with the first one, with "up"?

  • Take one preposition, "up" as an example, I've helped you with that.

  • I've even told you what it means.

  • Take that, okay?

  • Play the game.

  • Play it with a friend, play it by yourself, see what you can remember.

  • Play it with other people, play it engVid.

  • This is the harder version, and this is where we take nine prepositions, so you might want

  • to wait for a bit and work on some other prepositions first.

  • Okay?

  • And then play with the prepositions.

  • Now, to make...

  • To give you a little bit of a hint on what to do, the easy version of this game is if

  • you have the numbers, one, so that would be like across.

  • Okay?

  • You just need one preposition to go this "up", right?

  • "Walk across", that's it, easy enough.

  • And we have "down", you need to do two: "tone down", "go down".