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  • It's one of my most popular series ever  here on Youtube. Today it's a compilation  

  • interviewing for a job in America. If English  isn't your native language, you're going to  

  • learn some English and some important phrases  to know for interviewing and everybody is  

  • going to learn that you can prepare for and  ace your next job interview, let's do this.

  • You're hired! Two words everybody loves  to hear. But before we hear these words  

  • comes (dun dun duuuuhn!) the  

  • interview. Today's video is part one in a series  that's all about preparing for a job interview.

  • This is part one of a five part series on  preparing for an interview. Interviewing  

  • for a new job can be a huge  source of stress and anxiety.  

  • And if you're interviewing for a job innon-native language, the stress can be even  

  • higher. In this video you'll see me interview for  a job. Throughout the interview, we'll discuss  

  • some of the most common interview questions and  how to answer them. You'll also learn some basic  

  • information to get you started on creating your  own answers to these questions. Let's begin.

  • TK: Hello Ms. Smith, I'm Tom KelleyThanks so much for coming in.

  • RS: It's my pleasure, thanks  so much for meeting with me.

  • TK: Of course. Did you have  any trouble finding the office?

  • Small Talk. Most interviews will start out  with a handshake and some small talkthis  

  • may include questions about how you're doingyour travel to the interview, the weather,  

  • how your weekend went, and more. All you  need to do is be polite and friendly.  

  • Keep your answers short. You can  also feel free to turn the question  

  • back to the interviewer. For instance, if the  interviewer asks you how your weekend was,  

  • you might respond, “It was great, we celebrated my  Mom's birthday. How was your weekend?” Small talk  

  • is used to build a more comfortable environment  before the interview begins. It may seem silly,  

  • but you can practice small talk on your own  by asking yourself simple, easy-to-answer,  

  • non-personal questions. You could also practice  with a friend. Here is an example of small talk:

  • >> How are you doing?

  • >> I'm great, thank you, and you?

  • >> How are you doing?

  • >> I'm doing really well. It's  such a nice day out there.

  • >> It is! It was perfect weather all weekend.

  • >> It was.

  • >> Did you do anything  interesting over the weekend?

  • >> Yes, I went to the park  with my family for a picnic.

  • >> That sounds nice.

  • >> It was. And you?

  • >> I worked this weekend, butgot a lot done, so that was good.

  • >> It does feel good to get work done!

  • You can see we haven't said much of importancebut the conversation is friendly and open,  

  • and can make two people feel more  comfortable in each other's presence.

  • TK: Hello Ms. Smith, I'm Tom KelleyThanks so much for coming in.

  • RS: It's my pleasure, thanks  so much for meeting with me.

  • TK: Of course. Did you have  any trouble finding the office?

  • RS: Nope. The directions  on the website were great.

  • TK: Good. Would you like some  coffee or water before we begin?

  • RS: I'm okay, thank you.

  • TK: Alright. So, to get started, why don't  you tell me a little bit about yourself.

  • RS: Sure.

  • Common Question: Tell me a little bit about  yourself. It's very common for interviewers  

  • to simply ask you to tell them about yourselfThat can feel overwhelming! But don't worry;  

  • what they really want you to focus on is  your education and work history. You can  

  • also let them know what areas you have a lot  of experience in, or what your interests are  

  • when answering this question. Here arefew different ways to begin your answer.

  • I studied at Harvard University and  graduated 2012 with a degree in business.

  • I've been working at Smith  Incorporated for 10 years as a manager.

  • I have 12 years of experience in graphic design.

  • Because of my time at Verizon, I have a lot  of experience in providing customer service.

  • If you're preparing for an interview, practice  talking about yourself and your work history.   

  • Record yourself with a video camera if possible.   Make sure it's not too long, maybe around a  

  • minute.  Go back and listen or watch, and write  down phrases that worked well to use again.  If  

  • there was anything you stumbled over or left outwrite down some possible phrases you could have  

  • used.  The next day, do the same exercise.  It's  important that you don't just write a paragraph  

  • and memorize it, but simply practice free-talking  with some key phrases. The more you practice  

  • before the interview, the more comfortable you'll  feel answering the questions during the interview.

  • TK: So, to get started, why don't you  tell me a little bit about yourself.

  • RS: Sure. I studied at the University of Florida  and graduated in 2010 with a Masters Degree in  

  • Toy Design. After graduation, I was hired at  Happy Kid's Creative. I've been there for the  

  • past five years and am currently the Director  of Toy Production. During that time sales have  

  • grown steadily. It's been a great experiencebut I've run out of room to grow with HKC and  

  • I'm looking for new opportunities. I have a lot of  experience leading teams in the creative process  

  • and finding new markets for  the products that we create.

  • TK: That's great. Can you tell me  how you heard about this position?

  • Can you tell me how you heard about this  position? This is a common question that  

  • you'll hear in interviews. It's a chance to share  a little bit about the research that you've done  

  • in order to learn about the position you are  applying for. It's also a chance to share if  

  • someone from inside the company let you know about  the position. Here are some example responses:

  • I heard about the position from one  of your current employees, Bob Greene.

  • I heard about the position from my friend  Liz Miller, who works in Accounting.

  • I saw this position on LinkedIn.

  • I read about the position on your website.

  • Since this is a simple question with a simple  answer, think about your answer and practice  

  • it out loud before your interview. Record  yourself and listen. Are you easy to understand?  

  • Are there any words that are challenging for  you? Practice these words separately, slowly,  

  • thinking about the mouth positionAs it becomes more comfortable,  

  • speed it up. You're going to want to practice  tough words 10, 20, 30 times in a row.  

  • Build your muscle memory, so in the interview  it will naturally be easier to pronounce.

  • TK: That's great. Can you tell me  how you heard about this position?

  • RS: Of course. A friend of mine saw the position  listed on LinkedIn and forwarded it to me,  

  • so I spent some time on your website learning  about the position and the company. I also  

  • read an article in Business Weekly about  your work that really got me interested.

  • TK: What attracted you to our company?

  • Common Question: What  attracted you to our company?  

  • This question gives you the opportunity  to share what you know about the company,  

  • and why you would like to work there. Some ways  to begin your response include the following.  

  • Notice that most responses show that you havestrong feeling about what you learned. This will  

  • give the interviewer more information about who  you are and what you might bring to the position.

  • I was really impressed with your  commitment to renewable energy.

  • I was very excited to learn that you support  your research department so strongly.

  • I read that you encourage employees  to spend time with each other  

  • outside the workplace, and that  is something I really appreciate.

  • Again, think about the answer to this question  before your interview, and practice your  

  • responses using recordings and repetitionEven if this question is not asked, the time  

  • spent practicing the response will be helpful when  you answer other questions during the interview.

  • TK: What attracted you to our company?

  • RS: To be honest, what really caught my eye was  your focus on growth. I was really impressed with  

  • your ambitious goals and the clear plan you  have for achieving those goals. I also like  

  • the support you provide for your employees.  I love your continuing education initiatives,  

  • where you pay for employees to learn new techniques and skill sets.  

  • I think that really helps to build  employee satisfaction and loyalty.

  • TK: You've obviously done your homeworkWhat would you say is your greatest strength?

  • Common Question: What would you say is your  greatest strength? This question gives you the  

  • chance to talk about what you do really well as an  employee, and as a person. You can share what your  

  • greatest strength is, then explain how that helps  you in your current job or life. For example:

  • My greatest strength is _________. I find  that this is very important when I _______.

  • My greatest strength is flexibility.  I find that this is very important  

  • when I'm working with lots of  different people and opinions.

  • To practice answering this questionwrite down: My greatest strength is  

  • (blank). Then, fill in your strength. Write down  how this strength is demonstrated in your life and  

  • work. You may come up with several  different strengths you want to highlight.  

  • That's great, practice them all. But in  the interview, you'll only want to use  

  • one or two answers. Practice answering the  questions out loud, based on what you wrote  

  • down. But don't just memorize written textPractice speaking freely on these ideas.

  • TK: What would you say is your greatest strength?

  • RS: I would say, my greatest strength iscombination of enthusiasm and persistence.  

  • My work ethic won't let me settle for less  than my best. I'm able to persevere through  

  • challenges and setbacks without falling  into frustration or anger. I've noticed  

  • that this tends to keep those around me  in good spirits as well, which is a plus.

  • TK: That's very good.

  • TK: Can you tell me about  a time where you suffered  

  • a setback and had to maintain your enthusiasm?

  • Common Question: Can you tell me about  a time when you suffered a setback and  

  • had to maintain your enthusiasm? The  interviewer may ask questions like  

  • this to get a better sense of how you behave  and perform in certain stressful situations.  

  • The question may be about your actual past  experiences, or a hypothetical situation,  

  • to see how you would respond. Here are examples  of other questions that are similar to this one:

  • Tell me about a time when you had to  deal with a difficult client or coworker.

  • Tell me about a time when you  had to respond to a crisis.

  • Tell me about a time when you  had to give difficult feedback.

  • How would you handle a situation  where you and your supervisor  

  • disagreed about an issue or course of action?

  • You can see, there's a lot of variety  in the kind of way question is asked,  

  • so it's impossible to know exactly  what you might need to say.  

  • In the days leading up to your interview, practice  responding to several different versions of this  

  • question every day. This will help build important  vocabulary you might need in the interview,  

  • and will also help you feel ready  to answer questions like these.

  • TK: Can you tell me about  a time where you suffered  

  • a setback and had to maintain your enthusiasm?

  • RS: Sure. One definitely comes to mind. Last year  a project for a new toy was in its final stages  

  • after two years of work. As we were looking at the  branding and working up a final marketing plan,  

  • a competitor launched a version of the  exact same toy that we were launching.  

  • As the leader of the project, I knew that my  reaction would set the tone for the group.  

  • I acknowledged that it was a setback, but  challenged the group to think of this as a  

  • blessing in disguise. I asked them to go out  and buy the competitor's product and make a  

  • list of anything they wished the toy could do  that it didn't. It turned out that the list was  

  • pretty long. We added these items to our toy, and  launched a far superior product 6 months later.  

  • So, in many ways, the competitor's  product became the key to our success.

  • TK: That sounds like a great victory. NowWhat would you consider your greatest weakness?

  • Common Question: What do you consider to be your  greatest weakness? This question can be a tough  

  • one. You want to be as honest as possible when  answering this question. This is an opportunity  

  • to show a future employer that you know yourselfand are willing to work to improve yourself.  

  • Share a weakness, like public speaking, or  attention to detail, fear of failure. And  

  • then talk about ways you've worked on improvement  in that area. Here is a way to start a response:

  • My greatest weakness is ___.

  • It shows up in my work when __.

  • The ways I've worked to  improve in this area are __.

  • Take a moment to think about something  you've struggled with in your work life.  

  • Think of ways that you've worked to improve, any  books that you've read, classes you've taken,  

  • and so on. These are the things you want to share  with the interviewer when answering this question.  

  • Remember, the important thing is  to show that you are aware of your  

  • weak spotsand that you are already  working at improving in these areas.

  • TK: Now, what do you consider  your greatest weakness?

  • RS: Chocolate. Just kidding! No, my biggest  weakness is public speaking. It's something  

  • that I've spent a lot of time working on  and in which I've improved a great deal.  

  • I'm very comfortable in smaller meetings  with my teams. But when I present an idea  

  • or concept to a larger audience, I still  experience some stage fright. At this point,  

  • I can handle these situations professionallybut I would like to be more comfortable in these  

  • moments so I can really enjoy the experience  of presenting, rather than just survive it.

  • TK: Fear of public speaking is a very common  fear; I'm in the same boat on that one!

  • TK: Where do you see yourself in five years?

  • Common Question: Where do you see yourself in  five years? This is a chance to share your goals  

  • for the future. You want to demonstrate that  you understand what is realistically achievable  

  • over a certain period of time. You'll also be  letting the interviewer know how ambitious you are  

  • with this answer. If you haven't thought about  this question at all, it can be a great idea  

  • to think about this before your interviewAlso, think about answers to two variations:  

  • where do you see yourself in one yearwhere do you see yourself in 10 years.

  • You start this response by saying:

  • In five years I would like to be ___.

  • Practice answering this question out  loud as you prepare for your interview.  

  • If you only practice your answers in your headit will be much more stressful when you're in  

  • the room with the interviewer, speaking out loud  for the first time. Record yourself. Critique your  

  • own speech. What was unclear? How you could you  clarify, or say more concisely, your thoughts?

  • TK: Where do you see yourself in five years?

  • RS: As I mentioned before, I'm interested in  growth. In five years I would like to be a part  

  • of a company growing its business  on a regular and consistent basis.  

  • I'd like to be in a Vice President position  with a focus on development. And while I know  

  • that would require much more public speakingin five years I plan on being ready for it.

  • TK: Okay, well, I have everything I need,  

  • but do you have any questions for meabout the company or the position?

  • Common Question: Do you have any questions for meSo far, the interview has been about whether or  

  • not you would be a good fit for the company. With  the questionDo you have any questions for me?”,  

  • it's your turn to find out if the company isgood fit for you. The questions you ask will also  

  • show how well you know their company  and the requirements of the position.

  • Before the interview, write down any questions  you have about the position, the company,  

  • or the work environment. Then practice those  questions out loud. Chances are, you won't need  

  • to ask all of them. Some might be answered  during the earlier parts of the interview.

  • TK: Okay, well, I have everything I need,  

  • but do you have any questions for meabout the company or the position?

  • RS: Yes. Imagine you're looking back on this  hiring decision in a year. The person you hired  

  • has exceeded your expectations. What did  he or she do that impressed you the most?

  • TK: That's a great question.  

  • I think in one year the person would have come  in and spent some time learning from the team and  

  • people that have been here a while. Then, she or  he will begin making changes in an informed way.  

  • In one year I want this person's team to  be a well-oiled machine. I want them to  

  • be bouncing ideas off each other, coming up with  new designs and making headway into new markets.

  • RS: That's helpful. It's good to  know what the expectations are.  

  • Can you tell me a little bit more about the team  that I would be working with?

  • TK: Sure. I believe all of them have been with the  company for over five years and know the ropes. I  

  • would say there's a little bit of frustration  currently because of our lack of growth.  

  • This will be the third time we've brought  in a new team leader in four years.

  • RS: Do you know what's causing  that kind of rapid turn over?

  • T: To be honest, the last three team leaders  have been hired from within the company.  

  • And sometimes it's hard to think outside the  box when you've been inside the box for awhile.  

  • We're hoping to bring in some new ideas and  energy and get our development team back on track.

  • RS: That makes sense. I really appreciate  that you're considering me for the position.  

  • I'd love to be a part of the  company achieving its goals.