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  • Seventy-seven Benevolent Elephants

  • I can't do this one. Why practice tongue  twisters? My students who have problems  

  • with some of the sounds in American English  need to train their mind to guide their mouth,  

  • to effortlessly go through the positions for these sounds. Tongue twisters can help with  

  • this. they can help build the brain connectionThis is a T-H thhhh so that your body can do it  

  • on its own, without thinking of it, without the  mind having to guide the tongue through the position. And  

  • that's what we want of course. We want the habitWe want to take the sounds that are hardest,  

  • and make them effortless. So today we're going  to go over some tongue twisters to untwist  

  • your tongue and help you master some of the  trickiest consonant sounds of American English.  

  • As always, if you like this video or you learn something new, please give it a thumbs  

  • up and subscribe with notifications, and  come join us Tuesdays for new videos.

  • Today we're training 3 super-tricky tongue  twisters. First, Seventy-seven benevolent  

  • elephants. This is going to help with your V. My  students from India and Germany tend to sometimes  

  • switch V and W, and these can be tricky  sounds for other language groups as well.  

  • Mastering this tongue twister will help  your brain really get that V is vvv.

  • We're also to dowhich wristwatches are Swiss  wristwatches?” Hitting the W hard, also the  

  • R. That's because the W is silent in the word  'wrist'. Look out, this one is really tricky.

  • And I'm not going to forget  that ever important TH.  

  • He threw three free throws” – you'll  get to work on R with that one too.  

  • What other tongue twisters do you knowPut them in the comments below.

  • Let's look at our first one, seventy-seven  benevolent elephants. That's a lot of elephants.  

  • Benevolent means kind, expressing goodwillhelping others. You usually don't think of  

  • an elephant as being benevolent, but it does makegood tongue twister. This one is tricky. Too fast,  

  • and it even native speakers mess it up. This  is my friend Ginny and her daughter Natalie.

  • Seventy-seven Benevolent Elephants

  • And this is my sister-in-law Audrey.

  • Seventy-seven Benevolent Elephants

  • We'll focus on the word 'benevolent'. First,  

  • it helps so much with a longer words to focus  on stress. The second syllable here is stressed,  

  • let's practice just that. Nev. Nev. It's like  a hill. Nev. Nev. It has our tricky V sound. V,  

  • not a W, no lip rounding. Nev, vvv. Nextunstressed. The first syllable is just 'be,be'.  

  • Very simple, very fast. Let's put it  with the stressed syllable. Benev. Benev.  

  • Remember, these two syllables should feel totally  different. One is stressed, one is unstressed.  

  • The first one is very fast, the second one is  longer, it has that hill shape. Benev. Benev.  

  • Our other two syllables, -olent, -olent.  

  • All three of our unstressed syllables here  have the schwa, pronounced like this 'uh'.  

  • Can you believe that? Almost no jaw drop, totally  relaxed face. It almost doesn't even look like  

  • I'm not even talking. -olent, -olent,  -olent. Benev - -olent. Benevolent.  

  • Put them together but don't slow down  those fast syllables. Keep them fast, keep  

  • it simple. Benevolent. Seventy-seven benevolent  elephants, Seventy-seven benevolent elephants.

  • The next word, elephants,that first syllable has  the hill shape, the stress. Practice with me. El-.  

  • El-. The other two syllables, schwas, said more  quickly. Ephant. Ephant. Ephant. Put it together,  

  • elephant. The PH makes an F sound. Did you knowand V have the same mouth position? F is unvoiced,  

  • meaning just air makes the sound, ffff, andIs voiced, meaning your vocal cords are engaged,  

  • making a sound. Vvvv. I'll alternate. See that  nothing in my mouth changes. Ff, vv, ff, vv.  

  • Let's put the two words together. It's going  to be common to make the ending T a stop T.  

  • Stop the air in your throat, but don't  release tt, the T sound. Benevolent,  

  • benevolent. Benevolent elephants. Move your arm on  those stressed syllables. Benevolent, benevolent,  

  • benevolent elephants. Okay, move your arm  on those stressed syllables. Benevolent  

  • elephants, Benevolent elephants. Benevolent  elephants. Do it as slowly as you need to,  

  • to make sure you're doing it correctly. Rememberwe want to train the right positions.

  • Seventy-seven. This is going to help us  train that V sound some more. Both parts  

  • of the word have first syllable stressSeventy-seven. Seventy-seven. Notice I'm  

  • making that T more of a D, or a Flap T soundThis is an exception. Usually after N it's  

  • either dropped or a True T. But here it's  a Flap T. Seventy-seven (flap). Seventy.  

  • Seventy-seven. Seventy-seven. Okay I'm going to  try it now. Seventy-seven benevolent elephants.  

  • Seventy-seven benevolent elephantsIf V is at all tricky sound for you,  

  • do this over and over. Slowly. Get it down  good. This will help. Don't go so fast that  

  • you're doing it incorrectly. You want to practice  doing it right, then you can speed it up.

  • Our second tongue twister today iswhich  wristwatches are swiss wristwatches”.  

  • This one is so hard.

  • which wristwatches are swiss wristwatches”.

  • I cannot do it quickly at all. Look at all these  W and R sounds. W are in red, R in blue.  

  • Beginning R and W actually look a lotlike from the outside. Watch: rrrrrr, wwwww.  

  • Lots of lip rounding. But what's  happening inside is pretty different.

  • For R, the middle part of the tongue lifts towards  the roof of the mouth, the tip is back and up,  

  • not touching anything. For the W, the tongue  tip touches the back of the bottom front teeth,  

  • then the back stretches up, and we have a little  something extra in the throat. Wwww, just a little  

  • bit of a narrowing here. Wwww, Wwww wRrrrrist  wwwwwatch. If R is at all a problem for you, or W,  

  • then nailing the tongue twister, slowing it downgetting it right, is going to help you out.

  • Let's do just the first two words: which wristwhich wrist. Both have the IH as in SIT vowel.  

  • Which wrist, and the both have that hill  shape, they're both stressed. Which wrist,  

  • which wrist, which wrist, which  wrist. Do that with me slowly: which  

  • wrist, which wrist. Let's put in the  second half of our compound word,  

  • 'watches'. IN a compound word, the first word  is stressed. So Watches is unstressed, watches,  

  • watches, watches. It doesn't have that hill  shape, it's flatter. Wrist watches. Wrist watches.  

  • Say that with me. Wrist watches, wrist watchesWhich wrist watches, which wristwatches.

  • By the way, this reminds me  

  • of another terribly hard tongue twister,  “I wish to wash my Irish wristwatch.”  

  • I made my nieces and my niece's fiancée try that  one a couple of years ago, it was not pretty.

  • But this one, I think, is slightly easier. By  the way, I'll put the link to that other tongue  

  • twister video in my video descriptionOur next word is 'are'. This word won't  

  • be stressed. In fact in lots of sentencesnative speaker would just say 'er'. “Where  

  • are the kids?” Where are, er, er, er. For examplelet's try that. Just 'er' on the end of 'watches.  

  • Which wrist watches are. Which wrist watches areWatches are, watches are, watches are. Reducing  

  • are. Next, Swiss, we have another W.  Lip rounding. Swiss, swiss. This is also  

  • stressed with that hill shape. A little bit  longer. Swiss. Which wrist watches are Swiss.  

  • Do it slowly and accurately. Which wristwatches  are Swiss. Notice even when I'm going slowly,  

  • I'm still connecting all the words in that  line. We want that. No breaks, no separation.  

  • All smoothly linked. That's something we just  love in English. Which wristwatches are Swiss.  

  • Now all we need is 'wristwatches' againWhich wristwatches are Swiss wrist watches?  

  • Which wristwatches are Swiss wristwatches? Have  you got that? Take your time, do it daily.

  • Okay, our third and final tongue  twister that we're practicing today  

  • is pretty tough. My sister-in-law  and niece could not get it.

  • He threw three free throws.

  • He threw three free throwsNatalie couldn't get it either.

  • He threw three free throws.

  • Not quite. Julia, nope.

  • He threw three free throws.

  • Let's give Ginny a try.

  • He threw three free throws.

  • (lauging) I'm so sorry.

  • She says no, she can't do it. But you can  do it. We can do it if we slow it down,  

  • get it good, and then speed  up. And if you master this,  

  • your TH is going to be a lot clearer  and THR would be way less intimidating.

  • This one is extra tough because  we're dealing not just with TH and F,  

  • but with clusters with R. THREE, FREE.  A lot of little kids can't even say TH  

  • actually. They say F instead. I  remember when my son Stoney did that.

  • Marf..

  • So you're going Marf. You're using your  lip but we want to use your tongue.

  • No almost. Bring your tongue.

  • He wasn't very interested in learning that dayWas he? To make the unvoiced TH like threw,  

  • three, and throws, your tongue tip  has to come through the teeth. Th, th,  

  • just air. No tension, no holding, no stopping,  

  • th. Easy sound. Let's alternate between three and free.  I'll zoom in.

  • Three, free, three, free,  

  • three, free. You can do it. It takes practicebut you can get it. He threw. Let's just do that.  

  • Threw is stressed. He threw, he threw. Three is  also stressed, another THR cluster. So for the  

  • THR, you go from the tongue tip being out, th to  being pulled back and up a little bit. Thr, thr.  

  • Slow it down, feel that movement  at the tip of your tongue.  

  • Thr

  • He threw three. He threw three. He  threw three. Free is also stressed.  

  • Here you do want to use your bottom lipTh, th, three. And then throws, unstressed.  

  • Free throws, free throws, free throws. Do that  with me slowly. Free throws. You can hold out  

  • the consonant, really make sure you're getting the  right mouth position. He threw three free throws.  

  • Practicing slowly gives your mind time to guide  your tongue into the right position. And once your  

  • brain does that enough, you won't have to think  about it anymore. The habit will be made.

  • Our three tongue twisters today are all  training problem consonant sounds in English  

  • for non-native speakers. Take your time. Get  it right. Form the right pathway in the brain.  

  • You can do it. Seventy-seven benevolent elephantsWhich wrist watches are Swiss wristwatches?  

  • He threw three free throws. And as you get more  comfortable, you can increase your speed. Tongue  

  • twisters are actually kind of fun, aren't theyHuge thanks to my friends and family for helping  

  • me out with this video, they're not afraid of  a few tongue twisters! Audrey, Emily, Molly,  

  • Taylor, Ginny, Natalie, and Julia, thank youKeep your learning going now with this video,  

  • and don't forget to subscribe. I make new  videos every Tuesday and I love being  

  • your English teacher. That's it, and thanks  so much for using Rachel's English.

Seventy-seven Benevolent Elephants

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B1 wrist tongue threw swiss stressed tongue twister

3 Tongue Twisters Native English Speakers Never Get Right! | Rachel's English

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    Summer posted on 2021/06/29
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