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  • Hey, I'm Rachel from Rachel's English and  today we're studying English conversation  

  • with my friend Dave who's going to  make us pizza. Doesn't this look good?  

  • We're going to look at a lot of different  vocabulary words and pronunciations here.

  • First, this word.

  • Look at that bubble.

  • Wow.

  • You probably know bubble as this:

  • And you probably know it as bubble gum or bubble  tea. But do you what it means to live in a bubble?  

  • This is a phrase that I've heard  used more and more in recent years  

  • and it means detached from the world. You  only know what's happening right around you,  

  • your friends, your family. You don't think  about what else is going on in the world.  

  • You don't inform yourself. It's sometimes  applied to people who live a comfortable life  

  • who don't really think about what it might  be like for someone who's less fortunate.  

  • Or it can be used to describe someone who only  interacts with people that have the same views  

  • and opinions like in politics as they  do. Let's use it in a sample sentence.

  • I really want to travel a lot with my children  

  • because I don't want their lives to  only be lived in an American bubble.

  • Okay, that's in a bubbleWhat about on the bubble?

  • If something's on the bubble, that meansdecision is being made and you're not sure  

  • what the outcome would be. It could go this  way or that way. For example, let's say I'm  

  • taking the top ten students in my Physics class to  form a team for competition. I have eight people,  

  • I know I'll use them for sure. Then I have four or  five kind of on the bubble. I'm not sure which of  

  • those students I'll choose. Each one of those students is on the bubble. They may get chosen or they may not.

  • Have you heard this word to describe  something inside you? A feeling can bubble up.

  • I started to feel panic. Bubble  inside me. An idea can bubble up.

  • I'm bubbling with ideas!

  • Or someone can be bubbly. Someone  who's bubbly is really cheerful.

  • The idiomTo burst your bubblemeans to wreck  an idea or reality that someone's put together  

  • that can't actually work out.

  • To say or do something that  

  • show someone his beliefs are false or  what he wants to happen will now happen.

  • For example, let's say I ran into my  friend from English class and I say  

  • What are you up to this weekend?” She  tells me all the great things she's  

  • going to do this weekend, all the fun she's  going to have. On Monday then, she'll start  

  • working on a paper that's due on Wednesday.  I might say, “I hate to burst your bubble,  

  • but that paper is due on Monday. You're going  to have to work on it over the weekend.”

  • So many uses for this word. And this dough  was bubbly with pockets of air in it.

  • Look at that bubble.

  • Wow.

  • Now I ask my friend Dave how  long he's been making pizzas.

  • Little over a year now  since I got this pizza oven.

  • Uh-uh.

  • This thing is definitely been a game  changer from my outdoor uh food and  

  • uhm entertaining capabilities.

  • Yeah, it's nice to be able to be outdoors.

  • It is.

  • Game changer is an idiom  and it doesn't necessarily  

  • have to do with games. It's anything that  significantly changes the outcome of something.

  • For example, let's say my friend  got into the college of her dreams.  

  • You know, I hate to burst your bubble  but that college is too expensive.  

  • But wait, she got a major  scholarship. Oh, this is a game changer!

  • With this scholarship, she will be able  to go to the college of her choice.  

  • Or, I got my grandma her first iPhone.  

  • It's a game-changer. She can keep in touch  with all her grandchildren now. Game changer.

  • Little over a year now  since I got this pizza oven.

  • Uh-uh.

  • This thing is definitely been a game  changer from my outdoor uh food and  

  • uh entertaining capabilities.

  • Yeah, it's nice to be able to be outdoors.

  • It is.

  • So, I'm just going to give myselflittle bit of extra assurance by sliding it.

  • Yeah, because it's so heavy with all that topping.

  • Yeah. But as soon as it hits that plate, it's  already baking. So now, it will be really easy to  

  • shift around. We want to get that lid back on so it draws the flame up and out.

  • What's the temperature in there?

  • You got me. I'd say somewhere between nine  hundred to a thousand degrees.

  • No.

  • Yeah.

  • No.

  • Hmmm.

  • Got me. This phrase means I don't  know. Have you heard it before?  

  • It could also bebeats me.” These both mean the  same thing. I don't know, I have no idea. Got me.

  • What's the temperature in there?

  • You got me. I'd say somewhere between nine  hundred to a thousand degrees.

  • No.

  • Yeah.

  • No.

  • Hmmm.

  • I just couldn't believe it. WellDave made several amazing pizzas.

  • Mushrooms,  

  • I did a little uh, grilled Zucchini over here.

  • Oh I was wondering, did you  had the grill going too?

  • Yeah I grilled some zucchini.

  • This has got some garlic, some turmeric.  I'm a big fan or turmeric right now.

  • It's supposed to be good to your joints, right?

  • Good at inflammation uh, anti-inflammatory.

  • So we're going to make a vegetable, uh, pizza here. Because Rachel, she loves her vegetables.

  • I do.

  • Yeah, it got a little extra burned there.

  • Hmm. Really good though.

  • How was it?

  • Amazing.

  • So the pizza got burned on the bottomLet's go over a few terms to discuss  

  • how things are cooked or baked.

  • With red meat, that is meat fromcow, it can be raw, not cooked at all.  

  • There's also rare, just a little cooked. The  internet is full of helpful infographics.  

  • We passed through medium and go all  the way to well-done. Burned is, well  

  • beyond well-done. Now, this terminologymedium, rare applies to red meat.

  • If you want to say that something  hasn't been cooked long enough,  

  • you could say underdone or undercooked.

  • One time, I got clam chowder  and the potatoes were too hard.  

  • Not cooked all the way, not  cooked through, undercooked.

  • So, one pizza on the bottom was  a little burnt. No big deal.

  • By the way, just last weekend, Dave made us  all pizza again and it was absolutely perfect.  

  • On point. I said, “Dave, you've  really dialed in your pizza.”

  • Dial it in is one of my favorite idioms and I have  a great video going over that idiom and the idiom  

  • Phone it inwhich has an opposite meaningcheck out that video in the video description.

  • I love that zucchini on there.

  • That zucchini is bomb.

  • If something is bomb, that means it's very  good. This is slang that my husband David uses  

  • a lot. Food can be bomb, a house can be bomb,  a trip, a view and so on. You'll also hear  

  • it asthe bomb.” It doesn't matter if  “theInfront or not, this pizza is bomb or  

  • this pizza is the bomb. They mean the same thing.

  • Who's that?

  • Hah. Me!

  • You're right! It's you.

  • Are you keeping a closer eye Dave?

  • I am definitely keeping a closer eye on this  one. See, we just get it nice and brown there.

  • It looks so good.

  • I said, “Are you keeping a closer eye?”

  • To keep an eye on something is an idiom  that means to pay attention to something.  

  • He's keeping a closer eye on the pizza  than last time so this one won't burn.

  • One time, I was at an indoor playground andasked another mom to keep an eye on Stoney while  

  • I went to the bathroom. Sometimes, if David is  simmering a soup but has to leave the house to  

  • get the kids, he might say, “Can you keep an eye  on the soup and stir it every once in a while?”

  • Think of a situation where you might  want to keep an eye on something for you.  

  • To pay attention to it for you. Then make  up a sentence an put it on the comments.

  • Are you keeping a closer eye Dave?

  • I am definitely keeping a closer eye on this  one. See, we just get it nice and brown there.

  • It looks so good.

  • I will say the texture of that crust is so good.

  • It is nice. I agree with you.

  • The texture of a food is important. The  consistency, how it feels in your mouth.  

  • Pizza crust can be chewy. That's what this  was, it can be dry, crispy. There's so many  

  • different ways to describe different textures  for food, hard, crunchy, soft, pillowy,  

  • mushy, gooey, runny, spongey and so on. Can you  think of more? Put them in the comments below.

  • I like a good chewy crust.

  • I will say the texture of that crust is so good.

  • It is nice. I agree with you.

  • This one's blowing up.

  • Oh, that looks about perfect.

  • Almost done. That's pretty good.

  • I'm going to hit this side

  • Yeah. See it's a little lighter?

  • Dave did a reduction over reduction. I love it  when people do this. The phrase was “I am going to  

  • hit this side.” You're probably familiar with the  way Americans reduce "going to" to "gonna." Very common.  

  • Have you ever notice before that I'm gonna  is sometimes reduced further? It can become  

  • I'muna or even just muna. This is what Dave did here. He said “I'muna.” Dropping the g of gonna.

  • I'muna hit this side

  • Now, hit this side. That just  means he's going to make sure  

  • that side is what get closest to the flame. Let's  listen a bit more. He also uses the contraction  

  • should have.” He saysHe let the  dough rest more than he should've.”

  • I'muna hit this side. See it's a little lighter?

  • I totally agree.

  • This stuff is making some deep dish. Today.  

  • I think I'll let it sit the dough rest  a little bit longer than I shoud've  

  • because the dough is a little less  stretchy, it's more bubbly, it's airy.

  • I just love capturing natural  English and finding the idioms  

  • and the reductions and sharing them with you here.

  • Massive thanks to my friend Dave who let me  capture his pizza-making skills on camera.

  • If you like Dave, give himthumbs up and a shout out in the comments.

  • Keep your learning going right  now and check out this video  

  • and be sure to subscribe with notifications on.  

  • I make new videos on the English language every  Tuesday and I'd love to see you back here again.

  • That's it and thanks so much  for using Rachel's English.

Hey, I'm Rachel from Rachel's English and  today we're studying English conversation  

Subtitles and vocabulary

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B1 bubble pizza dave eye game changer changer

English Vocabulary Pizza Party! | Learning Phrases & Idioms with Pizza

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    Summer posted on 2021/06/08
Video vocabulary