Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • after weeks of tension between the U.

  • K and the European Union over the distribution of vaccines, a joint statement has been issued pledging to work together to improve communications in relation to the pandemic.

  • The statement says they want to create a win win situation and expand vaccine supply for all citizens.

  • It was a notably different tone to the one struck by the EU earlier today when the commission proposed tougher controls on the exports of vaccines based on infection and vaccination rates in the destination countries.

  • Those plans will be presented to EU leaders tomorrow.

  • Let's go live to Brussels for the latest with our Europe editor Catchy Adler U Those talks between the EU and the UK on how to cooperate better over vaccines, their ongoing as you say, the joint statement tonight was positive in tone.

  • But some EU leaders at their summit tomorrow joined by the European Commission, will push for those tougher controls on vaccine exports which could affect the UK.

  • Now they say they would never want to use those controls, but they do want to get more vaccines for the EU, right.

  • A brutal third wave, desperate lockdown protests a deadly failure so far to get vaccines into arms.

  • EU covid woes are deepening by the day Angela Merkel, normally the European symbol of calm and control.

  • Suddenly you turn today on a planned Easter lockdown.

  • Under mounting political pressure, this whole business has created even more uncertainty.

  • I deeply regret that and ask for forgiveness.

  • Across the EU, there is growing frustration at a rollout far slower than the UK's.

  • Some blame their government, others the European Commission.

  • It's now on the defensive, accusing pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca of not delivering vaccines promised and demanding extra controls on vaccine exports to richer countries.

  • If AstraZeneca delivered exactly the number of dozers which was planned like they did in the U.

  • K, we will be today exactly at the same rate of vaccination that the U.

  • K.

  • So we have been heavily penalized heavily.

  • On the other hand, you have EU governments like France or Spain, that are sitting on millions of AstraZeneca jabs and not using.

  • I'm not sure it's millions, but that's a very good point.

  • We need to accelerate now as a campaign, we need to make sure that member states will be able to to have the logistic about to do this and it's true that in the UK the British government did pretty pretty well in this first phase.

  • The EU says it's already exported over 40 million jabs in the last two months, a quarter of those to the UK Existing export controls used once so far allow Brussels to keep hold of vaccines made by companies that oh jabs to the EU.

  • Now the commission also wants to be able to block exports according to reciprocity.

  • If the country in question has production facilities but doesn't send jobs to Brussels and proportionality if it's vaccine rollout is ahead of the EU, we're not after an export ban, says the commission.

  • We just want to secure vaccine supply.

  • But the world outside is accusing the EU of vaccine nationalism and not even all EU leaders are convinced about these new controls.

  • Some worry they'll disrupt the global supply chain for vaccines and others that it will further damage already strained post Brexit relations with the U.

  • K ahead of their summit.

  • EU leaders promise vaccine campaigns will take off soon one way or another.

  • But rising death and infection rates mean the short term looks bleak Katia Adler.

  • BBC News to Brussels Well Earlier today, Boris Johnson warned that he hadn't ruled out retaliation measures if the EU went ahead with plans to block the export of vaccines to the UK.

  • Prime minister, answering questions from a parliamentary committee this afternoon, was also asked about the easing of restrictions, and he suggested that pub landlords could demand proof that customers had been vaccinated.

  • Our political editor, Laura Ginsburg, has more details.

  • Not exactly your normal commute.

  • Are we being greedy with our vaccines?

  • Prime minister, the prime minister leaving the house not just for questions from the opposition but the occasional pummeling from parliament senior MPs.

  • There is a promise on both sides of the channel now to work together on the vaccine.

  • But if that goes wrong and exports are blocked, what would he do if British lives were at risk?

  • Do you rule out taking measured and proportionate retaliation to discourage the EU from impeding legally binding contracts for our accidents?

  • I think that the long term damage done by blockades can be can be very considerable.

  • You're not taking anything off the table in terms of a British response to decisions this week our priority is to is to continue the vaccine rollout to vaccinate the British people will do everything necessary that we can to ensure that that that happens.

  • With virus cases rising on the continent, MPs wanted to know why aren't border controls being tightened further and faster now that has that has to be balanced.

  • Technology made the exchanges more tested than normal, but the prime minister hinted tougher rules might come.

  • Why have you not introduced their additional measures or put France on the red list in terms in terms of in terms of putting, putting France on the red list, which is what you're talking about?

  • And uh, with the consequences that would have for UK, uh, supplies and for a cross channel movements.

  • But it is something that we will have to look at.

  • We will have to look at tougher measures.

  • Then what may rile his backbenchers?

  • The prime minister seemed to approve of the idea that vaccines could in some circumstances become a compulsory part of life.

  • It doesn't seem to me to be irresponsible at all for the far from it wholly responsible for care companies to think of requiring vaccination, what about a certificate for going to the pub, maybe up to individual Republicans.

  • Well, it may be up to into the landlord.

  • But grappling with the pandemic is still a huge job for the government, even a year on still big decisions to take.

  • Laura Ginsberg, BBC News Westminster.

after weeks of tension between the U.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 eu commission brussels prime minister tougher minister

EU and UK pledge to work together to expand vaccine supplies for all citizens - BBC News

  • 1 1
    林宜悉 posted on 2021/03/25
Video vocabulary