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  • What's the difference between 'adviceand 'advice'? That's what Shahnaz on  

  • YouTube would like to know and that's what  we're doing in this Learners' Question.

  • So, advice with a 'c' is an  uncountable noun - that's a d v i c e  

  • and notice the 's' sound - advice. It means  an opinion, recommendation or suggestion  

  • by someone that you should do something incertain situation. It's commonly followed by  

  • the prepositions 'about' or 'on' For example, you  need my advice about 'advice' - see what I did!  

  • Advice strongly collocates with the verbs 'giveand 'take'. You can give advice or you can take  

  • someone's advice. For example, my friend gave me  some relationship advice but I thought it was bad  

  • so I didn't take it. You can do something  on someone's advice. For example,  

  • on my father's advice, I became a teacher  but I really wanted to be a lion tamer.

  • It can be followed by an infinitive verbFor example, John! Look out for that lion!

  • My advice is to call a doctor  first thing in the morning.  

  • And, of course, as an uncountable noun, we can  make it countable by using 'a piece'. A piece  

  • of advice. I have three pieces of advice for  you: brush floss and use mouthwash every day!

  • Okay, this is a good time for me to remind  you about the Learners' Questions playlist!  

  • All your favorite Learners' Questions in  one easy to access place! Just click on  

  • the link and you'll go straight through to  our YouTube playlist! Who knows - maybe your  

  • question has already been answered! And if  you have a question for Learners' Questions,  

  • you can email us on learning.english@bbc.co.uk  - and don't forget at the end of this video  

  • there is a full summary slide with all  of the information that i've mentioned!

  • 'Advise' is a regular verb - that's a d v  i s e and notice the 'z' sound -advise. It  

  • basically means give advice - in other words, give  someone your opinion, suggestion or recommendation  

  • as to what they should do in a certain situationIts prepositions are 'on' or 'about'. So, now I'll  

  • advise you on 'advise'. Second time! I did it  again! You can advise something. For example,  

  • when working with lions I advise fear - lots of  fear! You can advise someone to do something.

  • For example, my father advised me to choosedifferent career. You can advise someone against  

  • doing something. For example, in the cage,  I advise against making any sudden movement.

  • Finally, you can advise that. For example,  

  • circus masters everywhere advise that people stop  disturbing lions - they recommend trying gorillas  

  • instead! Thank you very much for your questionShahnaz. I hope you found the answer useful! If  

  • anyone else out there has a question for  Learners' Questions, you can email us on  

  • learning.english at bbc.co.uk. I'll see you  next time on Learners Questions. Bye, guys.

  • What's the difference between 'fault', 'flawand 'weakness'? That's what Helen wants to know  

  • and that's what we're doing  on this Learners Questions!

  • 'Fault' is a noun which meansmistake or problem in something.  

  • We commonly refer to technical faults, mechanical  faults and electrical faults when talking about  

  • machinery or computers. For example, the  train was delayed due to a mechanical fault.  

  • Fault can also be used to talk about who is to  blame for a mistake. You will often hear people  

  • say: it's your fault, it's his fault, it's her  fault or it wasn't my fault. For example, it is  

  • completely my fault that this video is so awesome.  I do not apologize. Finally, 'fault' can be used  

  • in reference to what we believe is a negative part  of somebody's personality or character. But don't  

  • judge anybody too harshly because remember we  all have our faults. Except me! Now for the noun  

  • 'flaw'. 'Flaw' is a mark or a blemish which spoils  something's appearance. For example, this copy of  

  • the book has a tiny printing flaw on the cover  which makes it very rare and very valuable.

  • A flaw can also be a minor fault or weakness  in something making it less valuable or less  

  • effective and this is particularly common with  thinking or reasoning words, We can talk about a  

  • flaw in an idea, a flaw in an argument, a flaw in  a concept, a flaw in a design. For example, it's a  

  • nice idea but it has a serious flaw in it. Finally  we can talk about a flaw in someone's character  

  • or a character flaw. For example, my only  character flaw is that I'm very short-tempered.

  • Okay let's stop for a second so i can tell you  about the Learners' Questions playlist - every  

  • episode of learners questions is already there  for you and if you have a question maybe the  

  • answer is there already. So go and have a look. If  you have a question for Learners Questions you can  

  • email us on learning.english@bbc.co.uk and don't  forget at the end of the video there is a full  

  • summary slide. Now let's talk about the noun  'weakness' which is an area of something that  

  • lacks resilience or strength. For examplevampires have several weaknesses: garlic,  

  • sunlight, religious iconography  or a stake through the heart.

  • Like 'fault' and 'flaw', a 'weakness' can  be something that makes something else less  

  • attractive or less effective. For example, in  my opinion, the weakness of texting is that  

  • it doesn't communicate body language which is  so important. Finally like 'fault' and 'flaw',  

  • 'weakness' can also be used to describeproblem in someone's character. For example,  

  • their love of money isworrying weakness in my opinion.  

  • Thank you very much for your question  Helen. I hope I answered it for you.  

  • If you have a question for Learners Questions you  can email us on learning.english.bbc.co.dot.uk  

  • and don't forget as soon as I finish this  there is a full summary slide. Thank you very  

  • much for joining me and I will see you next  time on Learners Questions. Bye everybody!

  • What's the difference between the  verbs 'lie' and 'lay'? That's why  

  • Alejandra emailed us and that's what we're  talking about on this Learners' Question.

  • Okay, our first verb is 'lie'. The past tense  is 'lay' and the past participle is 'lain'.  

  • 'Lie' means to move into a horizontal or flat  position as you would do if you were going to bed.  

  • For example, if you don't feel well lie on  the bed. The verb 'lie' also means be in a  

  • particular place. If something lies somewhereit is somewhere. For example, the clothes lay  

  • all over the floor or my home lies five miles  east of London. In this way, using lie for place  

  • we can talk about where blame or responsibility  lies. Blame or responsibility lies with someone.

  • So, for example, the blame lies with him but asmanager the responsibility lies with you. In the  

  • same way, and formally speaking now, you can use  'lie' to talk about the place where a person is  

  • buried. For example, Charles Darwin and Isaac  Newton lie in Westminster Abbey. Okay, now let's  

  • talk about the verb 'lie'. The past tense of which  is 'lied' and the past participle of which is  

  • 'lied'. When you lie you speak falsely. You lie to  someone about something or about doing something.  

  • For example, he lied to his teacher about doing  his homework so he didn't get in trouble. Naughty!  

  • Unfortunately, lying is a pretty common occurrence  and as a result we have lots of fixed phrases that  

  • you can use to talk about it. So you can lie your  way into something, you can lie your way out of  

  • something, you can tell a bare-faced lie, you can  lie through your teeth or to emphasize that you're  

  • telling the truth you can say no word of a lieOkay, let's stop for a second so I can tell you  

  • all about the Learners Questions playlist! Yesall of your favorite Learners Questions in one  

  • easy to use place! Just click the link  and you'll be taken straight through!  

  • Who knows? Maybe your question is already there  and the answer is waiting for you to pick it up  

  • and if you have a question for  Learners' Questions, you can email us on  

  • learning.english@bbc.co.uk. And don't forgetimmediately after I finish speaking there is a  

  • full summary slide with all the information you  need to know on it! So make sure to check it out!

  • Now let's talk about the verb 'lay'. The past  tense of which is 'laid' and the past participle  

  • is 'laid'. When you lay something, you put  it down in a horizontal or flat position,  

  • often carefully. For example,  I laid the baby in her cot.  

  • There you go. Do not confuse this when you lieyou put yourself in a flat or horizontal position.  

  • When you lay something, you put it in a flat or  horizontal position. For example, I laid the baby  

  • on the bed and then I lay next to the baby to  sleep. Because lay means put something down,  

  • we can talk about laying things like carpet  or railway track or in a metaphorical way  

  • we can lay a dead person to rest. So, for  example, Isaac Newton and Charles Darwin  

  • were laid to rest in Westminster Abbey. The  verb lay can also mean prepare. We talk about  

  • laying the table for dinner or laying a place for  someone. For example, Mom, how many places do I  

  • need to lay at the table for lunch? You can talk  about laying a fire - that's where you make a fire  

  • ready to burn or we can talk about laying a trapFor example, the hunter laid three traps in the  

  • hopes of catching some dinner. And, of course any  animal which can push an egg out of its body lays  

  • that egg. Thank you very much for your emailAlejandra. I hope we answered your question.  

  • If anybody else out there has a question  for Learners' Questions, you can email us on  

  • learning.english@bbc.co.uk And don't forget  - there is a full summary slide coming just  

  • after I finish speaking. I'll see you next  time on Learners' Questions! Bye everybody!

  • What are the differences between 'peek', 'peakand 'pique'. That's what Farshid on YouTube would  

  • like to know and that's what we're going to  be talking about in this Learners' Question!  

  • Okay, let's talk about peek - that's p-e-e-k. When  you peek at something you take a quick look at it,  

  • often sneakily so as not to be seen. For  example, you know when you see someone  

  • that you really really like but you don't  want them to see you looking at them? Well,  

  • she peeked at him over her textbook.  

  • Or, we often talk about peeking at something  or someone peeking over something like a wall.  

  • You can peek through the curtains and you can  peek into somebody's window. The verb peek also  

  • means protrude. If something peeks, it can  be partially seen from behind something.  

  • This paper is peeking from my pocket or how did  you find me? I saw your shoes peeking from under  

  • the curtain. Now the word 'peak' - p-e-a-k has  lots of meanings because it's applicable in a wide  

  • range of contexts. It basically means the higheststrongest or most extreme point of something.  

  • The highest point in a graph, the tip ofmountain or the busiest time. For example,  

  • the peak of this graph shows you shouldn't travel  to the peak of the mountain during peak times.  

  • Peak is also a verb and it means reach the  highest point - so you can peak a mountain,  

  • or "I've peaked", said the actor after collecting  his Oscar. Although that means that the only way  

  • is down! Okay, let's stop for a second so I can  take a breather - because all this explaining is  

  • tiring work! Why not take the opportunity  while I've paused to leave us a like or give  

  • us an example sentence in the comments below! We would love to see the language that you've  

  • learned so far! Remember - if you have a question  for Learners Questions, you can email us on  

  • learning.english@bbc.co.uk. We would love to hear  from you - and don't forget also that at the end  

  • of the video there is a summary slide with all the  information printed on it for you to read in your  

  • own time! Finally, we have pique - p-i-q-u-e. Nowit's a verb and a noun and it's not very common  

  • but it's still used in two very nice expressionsFirst of all, you can be in a fit of pique.

  • This means become irritated because someone  has been rude to you or insulted your pride.  

  • For example, she left the room in a fit  of pique because they insulted her work.  

  • Secondly, you can pique someone's interest or  curiosity - that means make them interested or  

  • curious. For example, these new inventions have  really piqued my interest. OK, Farshid on YouTube,  

  • thank you very much for writing to us.  I hope that has answered your question.  

  • If you have a question for us on LearnersQuestions, there's the email - you know what it is  

  • and don't forget there is a summary slide coming  immediately after this. See you next time, guys.

  • This week's Learners' Question comes from  

  • Marita in Spain who asks: could you explain the  difference between pop in, pop out and pop round?  

  • OK, Marita, we'll do our best.

  • Now these three pieces of language you've chosen  are phrasal verbs - that means they are a verb  

  • combined with a preposition. In this context, the  verb 'pop' means go somewhere for a short period  

  • of time. If you pop out, you leave the building  that you are in - possibly your house or your  

  • office and maybe you're going to run an errand, so  you might collect some milk, post a letter or go  

  • and have some lunch. For example, I'm just popping  out to get some milk. I'll be back in a minute.  

  • Pop in has the opposite meaning. This means you go  inside a building for a short period of time, For  

  • example, oh wait a minute, I need to pop in this  shop and buy some toothpaste. And we also use pop  

  • in when we visit someone in a very informal way  - so, oh you're home on Saturday, i'll pop in and  

  • see you. It's in this kind of situation that we  also use pop round - although pop round puts more  

  • focus on the traveling. So, for example, Sarahwhy won't you pop around and have a cup of tea?  

  • I haven't seen you in ages! Remember that being  a phrasal verb, we can change the preposition to  

  • suit the context. Two slightly different examples  would be - I need to pop up on the roof and fix a  

  • satellite dish, or are you looking for JohnHe's just popped downstairs to speak to Tim.