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  • Hello and welcome to News Review from BBC Learning English.

  • I'm Tom. Joining me today is Catherine. Hi Catherine.

  • Hi Tom. Hello everybody. Today we're looking at the Grammys

  • and in particular we'll be talking about the singer Beyoncé.

  • Don't forgetif you want to test yourself on the vocabulary you learn today,

  • we have a quiz at bbclearningenglish.com.

  • Now, let's hear more about this story from this BBC radio report:

  • So, the Grammys took place in Los Angeles on Sunday.

  • It was the 63rd Grammy Awards

  • and the singer Beyoncé has setnew record: she won her 28th award,

  • which means she's won more Grammys than any other female artist ever.

  • Ever! Well done Beyoncé! Catherineyou've been looking at the world's media

  • for three words and expressions we can use today. What are they?

  • We have: 'decorated', 'took centre stage' and 'opted'.

  • 'Decorated', 'took centre stage' and 'opted'.

  • Catherine, can we have your first headline please?

  • We can. We are starting here in the UK with The Timesthe headline:

  • 'Decorated' – awarded.

  • Now, Catherine, the verb 'to decorate' –

  • this is something that you'd normally do in a house, right?

  • Yes, that's right, Tom. I'm sure you make your house

  • look absolutely amazing at Christmas, don't you?

  • Yeah, I 'decorate' my Christmas tree...

  • I could 'decorate' my walls when I paint them as well.

  • Yeah, all wonderful, blingy things – it looks all beautiful and colourful.

  • You add all these thingsit looks amazing.

  • So, the verb 'to decorate': D-E-C-O-R-A-T-E.

  • If you add the 'D' to the end of thatyou get the adjective 'decorated'.

  • Your house is beautifully 'decorated'.

  • Now Tom, one day you will receive an award

  • for your fabulous work, I'm sureprobably from the Queen.

  • You will go to Buckingham Palace and the Queen will pin a medal to you.

  • So, the Queen will 'decorate' me, right?

  • And I will become 'decoratedwhen she gives me this medal.

  • She will literally 'decorate' you by putting a piece of beautiful metal onto you

  • and that idea of giving somebody an award is...

  • we use the word 'decorate' to describe giving an award to somebody.

  • So, Beyoncé has been 'decoratedmany times at the Grammys,

  • actually 28 times she's been decorated.

  • So, 'decorate' – 'decorated' is the adjective.

  • What's this 'most decorated' about?

  • Well, she's been 'decoratedmore times than anybody else,

  • so we call her the 'most decorated':

  • the person who wins the most awards is the 'most decorated' person.

  • So, it's just a superlative form, right?

  • Exactly.

  • Excellent. OK. Thank you, CatherineLet's take a look at our summary:

  • OK. Today we're talking about the Grammys

  • but we did look at another award ceremony in a recent episode, didn't we?

  • We did. We looked at the Golden Globes

  • and that's where they 'decorate' actors,

  • so to watch that programme, just click the link.

  • Click the link. Excellent.

  • OKCatherine, can we have a look at headline number two please?

  • We can. We're going to Sky News now and the headline:

  • 'Took centre stage' – received the most attention.

  • Catherine, what can you tell us about this piece of vocabulary?

  • Well, it's a three-word expressionThe first word: 'took' – T-O-O-K.

  • Second word: 'centre' – C-E-N-T-R-E.

  • And this third word is 'stage' – S-T-A-G-E.

  • It's a verb phrase. Now Tom, you like going to the theatre, don't you?

  • And I know that you're quite fond of live music performances.

  • I mean, before lockdown yeah, I used to love that kind of stuff.

  • And you'd go to... yes, and one day you'll be doing it again, I'm sure!

  • And when you go to the theatre to watch these performances,

  • there's a lot going on onstage, isn't it, where you see all the performers?

  • Which part of the stage do you look at the most?

  • So, the part of the stage where my attention goes

  • is the middle of the stage or 'centre stage'.

  • Exactly. 'Center stage' is where most of the action happens in the theatre

  • and in particular in music concertsthe lead performer often stands

  • in the middle of the stagethe 'centre stage'.

  • When they walk onto the stagethey 'take centre stage'.

  • So, when you're receiving the most attention, you 'take centre stage'

  • but we've got the past form, 'took', here.

  • So, 'take' is the verb that, kind of, collocates with 'centre stage':

  • like 'take centre stage' – receives the most attention.

  • What's the headline saying here?

  • Well, it's saying that inthat Black Lives Matter was... took...

  • received a lot of attention, a lot of focus, at the Grammys.

  • The artists actually used Black Lives... used the Grammys as a platform

  • to make sure that Black Lives Matter got a lot of attention.

  • Excellent. OK. Let's takelook at our summary slide:

  • So, we're talking about the Grammys.

  • We're talking about Black Lives Matter.

  • Last year, we also had a News Review episode on Black Lives Matter, right Catherine?

  • We did. We looked at London protests

  • and if you want to see more about this story, just click the link.

  • Just click the link.

  • OKCatherine, can we have your next headline please?

  • We can. We're in the UK againwith NMEthe headline:

  • 'Opted' – chose.

  • Catherine, what can you tell us about 'opted'?

  • 'Opted' is the past tense of the verb 'to opt'.

  • We spell 'opted': O-P-T-E-D.

  • And 'opted' is related to the word 'option' and an 'option' is a choice.

  • 'To opt' – to choose. 'Option' is a choice.

  • Why are we saying 'opt', not 'choose'?

  • Well, the words are fairly synonymousan option is the same as a choice.

  • But the word 'opt' as a verb islittle bitslightly more formal.

  • It's a bit more formal. It's got, like, a... we could say a higher register. Now...

  • You can put it like that, yeah.

  • I know thesewell, this verb 'opt' – mostly from the phrasal verbs.

  • Can you tell us about the phrasal verbs that use 'opt'?

  • Phrasal verbs with 'opt', yes. You can 'opt in' or you can 'opt out'

  • and that meansif you 'opt in', you choose to participate in something.

  • You make a 'yes' choice and if you 'opt out' you choose not to do something.

  • OK. So, Neil asked me to do News Review today and I said yes,

  • so can I say 'I opted in' to do News Review?

  • If he gave you the choiceif there was another producer available,

  • then yes. Yes, you 'opted in'.

  • It was... it was a choice. Can you give us an example of 'opt out'?

  • Well, 'opt out' is a big...

  • I mean 'opting' in and out are quite in the news at the moment,

  • because here in the UK the coronavirus vaccination is optional:

  • you can 'opt in' to the vaccine programmeyou'll have the vaccine

  • or you can 'opt out', which means you choose not to have the vaccine.

  • Excellent example. I love how you use the word 'optional' as well.

  • OK. Great. Thanks Catherine. Let's take a look at our summary slide:

  • Great. So Catherine, can you please recap the vocabulary

  • for today's episode?

  • Of course. We had 'decorated', which means awarded.

  • 'Took centre stage' – received the most attention.

  • And 'opted', which means chose.

  • And don't forgetyou can test yourself on today's vocabulary

  • with our quiz on bbclearningenglish.com

  • and of course we are all over social media as well.

  • That's it from us today. Thanks for joining us and see you next time.

  • Goodbye. Bye!

Hello and welcome to News Review from BBC Learning English.

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Beyonce sets new world record - News Review

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/03/16
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